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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those of you who did the whole Santa Claus thing, when did your dc stop believing in Santa Claus? Did you eventually tell them, or did they ask, or figure it out on their own, or what? My daughter just turned 7. She wants a laptop for Christmas (<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/yes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="exclaim">). She knows this is a rather pricey gift. Today she said that dh and I should not get her a laptop. She will just hope Santa Claus brings one because it is cheaper for him since he makes everything himself. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/biglaugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="laugh">:<br><br>
Just wondering... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/biggrinbounce.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="bgbounce">
 

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Last year when he was 7, about a month before Christmas we were talking about Santa and my son abruptly asked "Mom, is the tooth fairy real?" I asked him what he thought and he said "No, I think you put the money under the pillow" and I told him he was correct (I draw the line at out and out lies). A few weeks later we were talking about Santa and he asked "Mom, is the Easter Bunny real?" and we talked some more.<br><br>
He waited until a few days after Christmas to ask me about Santa, it was like he wanted to believe for one more year, which was fine with me. They grow up so fast as it is!
 

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Ds figured it out when he was 3..the whole thing just never seemed very logical to him.<br><br>
For what it's worth I stopped believing around 5 or 6 but kept up the "I still believe" act for a few extra years because I knew that if I asked "Santa", I was most likely going to get the gift whereas my parents could say no easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the responses. When I was a child I remember being "sure" my parents were Santa Claus and, with my brother, coming up with lots of elaborate plans to "prove it". <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> Then my mother finally admitted that we were right and I felt a little let down. However, "Santa Claus" continued to give us presents until we went off to college! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/Sheepish.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Sheepish">: I intend to follow this precedent and I didn't want my daughter thinking she had to pretend to believe in Santa Claus to keep him coming. I don't know if that is what she is doing or if she really believes still...
 

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Since we don't celebrate Christmas as a religious holiday (we are Christians but we don't do the religious portion of it b/c we feel Christmas is a pagan holiday and we don't want to mix religion with secular things) I simply taught my kids that Santa is someone that a man made up, and that is a symbol of the Christmas spirit (goodwill towards men, giving, ext.). I told them that someone people like to pretend that he's real, but that he isn't, he's just a fun character like Mrs. Claus, the Elves, ext. I was pretty straightforward and honest with them and they caught on to it right away. They know that their presents come from mommy and daddy, or their grandma, auntie and extended family. I like that approach because I feel it makes Christmas more family oriented, and it's much nice to feel thankful if you open a present knowing that someone who cares about you got it for you. Just my two cents. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 
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