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I don't know if you all "do" the Santa/Easter Bunny, etc. thing. I almost wish that we hadn't at this point. My older dd started questioning whether Santa was real when she was about 5.5 -- at least that's when she started asking me. Since her little sister was only 3 at the time and I thought that she was too young, I kind of deferred the question with a, "well, what do you think?" approach.<br><br>
She was okay -- sort of -- with that for a while, but has started bringing it up again. She turned 7 almost 2 months ago. The other night when I tried to turn the question back to her again, she said, "well, you and dad do stay up kind of late..." I suspect that she has be suspicious for some time now and just wants my confirmation. I told her that we can discuss it more when her sister isn't around. (My little one just turned 5.)<br><br>
I don't want to flat-out lie to her, but 7 still seems young to me. At what age did your kids find out the truth about Santa? I remember it being a big trauma for me b/c my older brother found out at school when his teacher made a statement to the whole class that "by now you all know that there is no such thing as Santa" and he humiliated himself by standing up and saying, "what do you mean there is no Santa!?" He was so upset that he, of course, told me too.
 

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There was a great thread on this not long ago. I personally have told dd from the beginning that "Santa is a beautiful make believe story that kids and grown-ups play together." She is 4 and seems to fully believe in the EB TF and Santa Claus but if she asks again that's what I will tell her again<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
If she is starting to question it might be time for an answer like this - that way you are not lying but you are preserving the magic for your little one <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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<div style="font-style:italic;">I don't want to flat-out lie to her, but 7 still seems young to me. At what age did your kids find out the truth about Santa? I remember it being a big trauma for me b/c my older brother found out at school when his teacher made a statement to the whole class that "by now you all know that there is no such thing as Santa" and he humiliated himself by standing up and saying, "what do you mean there is no Santa!?" He was so upset that he, of course, told me too.</div>
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That is how I found out too. I was horrified. I was 8 years old and that irritating music teacher was playing the song "I saw Mommy kissing Santa Clause" and she said that since Santa was really Dad that mommy was just kissing her husband. I didn't say anything in class but one of my friends leaned over and said "see, I told you!".<br><br>
This sounds stupid but since it was third grade, I kinda planned on talking to dd about it during the summer before third grade. I mean everyone still seemed to believe during second grade and after music class I felt like the only one who was dumb enough to believe. Anna has already been asking questions though--specifics to how it all works. I have just said that no one knows for sure, that is why there are so many creative Christmas movies, people use their imagination to fill in the gaps.<br><br>
I have this great poem about it and I hope to use it. It talks about the spirit of giving and of Christmas and how people gave that feeling a name, Santa. And how on Christmas eve parents help the spirit live on but taking on the role of Santa. And how as long as we allow the spirit to enter our hearts then Santa will continue to live.<br><br>
I am paraphrasing here, but I loved the poem version. I don't want her to think of it all as a big scam but I do eventually want her to know that it is her parents who actually do the job.<br><br>
Amy
 

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My family is a bit mixed up I dont have a problem letting my daughter celebrate "Santa" but we have some family members who dont like it. So my daughter hears mixed things about it. I tell her uncle so and so doesnt believe in Santa. She tells me that she does" So I just say okay thats fine.
 

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I think this is great you have encouraged her to continue to believe as long as she was ready and willing. But it sounds like she is really asking for the truth now and so I would "let her in on the secret" . It isnt a lie so to speak it is a family ritual that is different for the younger/older members of the family. Give her a new role to acknowledge that she is part of it (and not excluded now that she is too old to belive the magic)<br>
My dd was 8 when she "knew" but she never told me. (she mentioned it to DH) IT was only this year at 13 where she has actually been ok with us talking about our role as Santa. Before even she knew and I knew she knew, it was important to her to keep up the game and pretend to still belive.<br>
This doesnt have to be a bit thing. Take your dd and sit her down and ask her if she really wants to know the big secret or if she wants to continue as things are. (this will kinda tell her her suspicions are true but gives her permission to keep up the game for her own enjoyment) I would then tell her that the secret is that Santa is really the spirit of giving. He is shown as a man with a beard in pictures and stories, but anybody who wants to give gifts in secret to make others happy is Santa and that is what has been going on in your home. Would she like to play santa too? Perhaps she can help fill a stocking for a pet or buy a secret gift for her sister. Or give small presents secretly to her friends.<br>
When I was a teenager it became my job to play Santa for my mom. My dad woudl giv eme $20 for my mom's stocking and I would go out (and add as much of my own money as I could) and fill her stocking and it was just one of my favorite memories about Christmas from that age. My sister did it before me.<br>
Growing up doesnt have to end the tradition and magic of santa for your DD, it can just enter another phase.<br>
Joline
 
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