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I just ordered some and was wondering if anyone else was using them. If so, how do you get them out without squeezing them and making a mess?
 

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I only pinch it just low enough that I can pull it out w/out it tearing, but that I'm not actually squeezing the whole thing. Does that make any sense? I found that it helps to prevent it from getting too messy.
 

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I was so happy to see a thread on this, since I'm planning to order some. Have you had problems with them leaking? I need some alternative menstrual product since I don't care for pads. I just started my second pp cycle and it's only my fifth cycle in the last seven years. I can't wear tampons anymore, they leak and they hurt when I remove them. Any info on the Sea Pearls would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Meiri
Are the sponges growing back quickly enough to not go extinct in the wild?

According to the info on the website they are...

Sea Pearls™ are natural, reusable Atlantic sea sponge tampons. They are a safe, efficient, dioxin- and rayon-free alternative to the ordinary single-use tampons. The average woman uses over 17,000 tampons during her menstruating years. Why be an average woman?

Sea Pearls™ are natural sea sponges. Sponges are plant-like creatures growing in colonies on the ocean floor. There are over forty-five hundred varieties, the softest of which are the Atlantic and Mediterranean Silks. As sponges are harvested, millions of egg and sperm cells are released into the surrounding water, making the sponge a renewable resource that provides an ecologically sound product for menstrual use. You can buy Sea Pearls™ Natural Sea Sponge Tampons at most natural food stores. If your local store doesn't carry them, please request that they do so!
 

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Quote:
As sponges are harvested, millions of egg and sperm cells are released into the surrounding water, making the sponge a renewable resource that provides an ecologically sound product for menstrual use.
Sorry to seem obstinant, can't help but ask the questions that come to mind, but the release of eggs and sperm does not quarantee the growth of new sponges. How long does it take a sponge to grow to usable size? Are they being harvested slowly enough to allow for the natural populations to not be depleted?

What about the pollution levels in the Atlantic? The Mediterranean isn't exactly pristine anymore either....
 

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Good questions, I have no idea but would love to know also.

I do know that you can use the same sponge for 4-6 cycles I think, so for people that are trying to decide between tampons and sponges, at least there is less waste, etc with the sponges and you definately get quite a bit of use out of them.

I had to stop using them for a while because I had horrible cramps (not from the sponges), but now that my cramps are better, I was able to use it last cycle. I didn't have any problem with leaks. I do want to get a Diva Cup to try though.
 

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Hi From Sponging central!

Quote:
Sorry to seem obstinant, can't help but ask the questions that come to mind, but the release of eggs and sperm does not quarantee the growth of new sponges
correct, shooting sperm into the water does not guarantee conception
I love that company's hooie...anyway, a hostess sponge of adequate size has to catch it!
No , they can't regrow completely with the way they are harvested. Cutting a portion does allow for continud growth, but cutting is no longer allowed because it damages the reefs.
Sponges are not "plant-like creatures" they are animals - you are putting a dead animal in your yoni. They are left on boats in the hot hot heat and slowly rot and it smells like death ( I live down wind from a sponger)
Also, small sponges are baby turtle food, and when taken, it disturbes the reef system, and forces turtles further out for food where they are taken by larger predators.
Sponges protect the shores by basically acting as filters.

From one of our Florida Fisheries commissions:
Your request for information on sponges has been forwarded to me.

Florida Sea Grant in cooperation with the Fish and Wildlife Commission has
been evaluating the recovery of sponge populations following a widespread
mortality. The cause of the mortality was a harmful algal bloom that
occurred in 1992-94. Our recent data is documenting that sponge populations
are recovering, but it has taken 10 years to see significant recovery.

It was our work that documented that sponge tissue left attached to the
substrate can regrow.

Sponge harvesters in the Keys cannot cut the sponges as diving for sponges
is prohibited. We found that even when sponges are torn from the bottom
with a hook and pole that only about one-third are able to regenerate.

PS, how about dioxin free natural cotton tampons with no applicator? and PPS, I had this info on file because I write for a local paper and recently did research on our sponging problem down here...
 

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As a vegetarian, I thought a lot about using a sponge, and decided it was the right thing to do for me. I've been using the same sponge for TEN YEARS. When I think about all the shipping fuel, packaging, cotton (do you know how many animals get killed by harvesters?), and shelf space I've saved in comparison to tampons (even organic ones, which I could never afford), it was definitely worth it for me.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by srain
(do you know how many animals get killed by harvesters?),
that is no reason to kill an animal and use the animal itself as a product. But to answer your question,prolly as many as die from being hit by sponging hooks
but
Not everyone is into animal rights or avoiding animal products. I just advocate knowing the facts so you can make an informed decision. Personally, I use mama cloth, and have for about 7 years.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by BrandyMama
So, is this a Sea Pearls sponge you've been using for ten years?
No, it was a plain ol' untreated artist's sponge. I only rinse or wash in soap and water; I think most people boil them, and I have no idea what that does for their longevity.
 
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