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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ds woke up with a fever this morning. Normally I wouldn't worry unless it doesn't go away within a day to two. We avoid fever reducers, he's at 101.5 right now so it isn't to bad. He was recently diagnosed with a seizer disorder, he has never had a seizer from fevers though. Are fevers treated differently with someone who has seizers? Is there anything I should worry about.<br>
We just moved and we a far from settled, in fact we are still waiting for his medical to be transfered so we don't even have a doctor yet. Last time he got a fever he got really sick and could hardly walk. He laid around for a week and ended up with antibiotic injections. All that caused him to regress quite a bit and it was almost two months before he was back to himself. I'm so not ready for that again. Send healing thoughts please.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"> I hope he gets well soon!<br><br>
Children with epilepsy tend to be more prone to seizures while sick or during a fever, but it's not a rule. My twin sons both have difficult-to-control epilepsy: one of them has HORRIBLE febrile seizures (the last time he had to be put on life support), and one of them just has increased seizures when he's sick. It's a person-by-person thing.<br><br>
The kind of fever you need to watch out for is one that comes on suddenly, or goes up in temperature suddenly. Those tend to cause serious seizures more often than a slow, steady fever.<br><br>
Ds1, the one with febrile seizures, is a kid that gets tylenol or motrin as soon as he shows a temp. He's had two febrile seizures that resulted in long-term hospitalization (and possible brain damage), so we never risk a fever. Ever. His first hospitalization was just after 12 months, and his last one was at 5 years. Not every fever causes a febrile seizure...it's pretty random, actually. The neurologists have said that it's usually a combination of the fever, the suddenness of the fever, and the specific challenges that each virus gives the body.<br><br>
Ds2 seems to be more sensitive to being sick, not necessarily the fevers. We still give him pain meds and fever reducers, but we're not as religious about it as we are with Ds1.<br><br>
If you're against using fever reducers, I'd say that's fine as long as your child hasn't shown a tendancy toward febrile seizures. BUT, if you see a sudden increase in temp, or if the temp gets higher than 102.5 (for example), I'd start using motrin or something. The risks of fever reducers, especially when used only occassionally or in extreme circumstances, are much less than the risks of a uncontrolled seizure. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>faerierose</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8976321"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Last time he got a fever he got really sick and could hardly walk. He laid around for a week and ended up with antibiotic injections. All that caused him to regress quite a bit and it was almost two months before he was back to himself. I'm so not ready for that again. Send healing thoughts please.</div>
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Ok, I was reading and my heart just stopped a little at this. First, I want to say that I've been thrown into a world right now of metabolic issues. But things you wrote send up red flags for metabolic disorders.<br>
Kids with metabolic issues can be prone to seizures. Even more concerning is that many metabolic kids regress or go into metabolic crisis with illness and you seem to be describing a very serious regression.<br>
So I hope I'm over-reacting but I'm concerned. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/hug2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Hug2"> I'm sorry. I know it is alarmist and maybe you're already well aware.<br>
I also never treated fevers. But I was told that the rules are different for metabolic affected children as the stress of fever can make things worse. I'm not sure how I feel. I still don't plan to treat Caleb's fevers and I need to do research to decide on Andrew who has a probable mitchondrial disorder.<br>
Anyway, has anyone mentioned metabolic issues? This is information on mitochondrial <a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=734501" target="_blank">http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=734501</a> and this is a site with informaton on fatty acid disorders <a href="http://www.fodsupport.org/fods_defined.htm" target="_blank">http://www.fodsupport.org/fods_defined.htm</a> I don't have anything listed in the link I wrote about regression during illness--I just mention regression in general--but that is a hallmark of metabolic disorders.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/hug2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Hug2"><br>
In the meanwhile, make sure he stays hydrated and fed--at least with something with carbohydrates even if it is just a drink. My kiddos don't eat when sick but now I know the drops in blood sugar can be devastating to a child affected by metabolic issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for the advise. Given how he reacted to the fever last time I decided to give him some motrin now rather then wait and see, he spit half of it out though :-( He is already just laying around, in and out of sleep. He hasn't eaten anything today but he is drinking well. It's really hot here so I know I need to make sure he doesn't get dehydrated. I have no idea what is causing the fever. His older sister also just got one, they don't have any other symptoms that I can see and dd says nothing hurts.
 

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In addition to the dehydration if you think there is any possiblity he may have a metabolic condition you need to keep his blood sugar stable. I'm no good at advice here because this doesn't seem to be my son's issue (and he doesn't regress after illness probably because of this). <a href="http://www.fodsupport.org/child_sick.htm#bsl" target="_blank">http://www.fodsupport.org/child_sick.htm#bsl</a> Here's a link from FOD board but it isn't specific to illness. Point is he needs carbohydrate source in that drink to keep his body fueled and out of crisis. If he won't drink anything but water this site mentions and I know Katie has used some type of instant glucose tab or solution. I wish Katie was here to advise.<br>
I don't think the type of illness matters. It is just that any illness puts stress on the body--everyone's body--and those with metabolic conditions don't handle that well.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"> My son stops eating when he's sick, too. Last time he went almost seven days without eating solids. One thing that helped keep his blood sugar from complete chaos was giving him apple juice. He doesn't especially like it when he's sick, but it's the only thing he'll take down (other than water)...no pedialyte, no homemade concoctions....just dilute apple juice.<br><br>
When he's in the worst of it, I give it to him slowly by oral syringe. You can get larger (10cc or larger) oral syringes for free at most pharmacies. Just go up to the counter and say you forgot to pick up a syringe for your son's med.<br><br>
Little bits of diluted apple juice, given in the corner of his mouth while he's watching DVDs or listening to music....it meant we could get a few cups of fluids/sugar/calories into him each day, and that meant no emergency room.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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Even kids who don't get febrile seizures tend to be more prone to them when running a fever. My son has never had a febrile seizure but when he runs even a slight fever it brings on more seizures.
 

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I am more quick to give my prone-to-febrile-seizures-but-non-epileptic daughter fever reducers faster than I am to give them to my epileptic-and-on-anticonvulsants daughter. I like to use Be Koool gel sheets that are non-medicated and stick onto my kids' foreheads to cool them down. You can get them at most large chain drugstores. Of course cool washcloths and lots of liquids are important, too.<br><br>
Sorry your little guy is feeling so bad.
 

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we too, hardly ever used fever reducer medicine until charlotte came along. she has some type of seizure disorder and is also prone to seizures with a fever. for her as low as 99 degrees sets off seizures. never thought that they weren't febrile seizures before, but maybe she is just more prone to the seizure with the fever? they are definitely different than her regular seizures. she doesn't breathe/once her heart stopped/cpr for some time with one especially high fever (influenza)...<br>
anyways, don't want to scare you, but just to say that my opinion of motrin changed with the many scares and er trips we have had.<br>
paige
 
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