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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2 year old has been spirited since she was born. At this point she can be impossible to deal with at times. I am wondering if it is normal 2 year old behavior or something more.<br>
I am thinking she may have sensory problems because she is very sensitive to physical things. She went through a phase of not wearing socks because of the toe seam and also not wearing any shirts with a bound sleeve. She got a bunch of mosquito bites at granmas the other day and I thought it was bit odd that it kept her up throughout the night whie her sister slept through.<br>
She is destructive, constantly getting into things and making messes. If things don't go right for her she often loses it. The days with her have become one big whining fit it seems. I am just constantly having to keep things just so for her so we don't have a big explosion. She ignores just about everything I say, and if I get down on her level and look into her face she freaks out. Like I said, could be typical 2 year old behavior, but seems like it could be more.<br>
thanks.<br>
Beth
 

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If you think it's something more, it's worth checking out. The thing with these issues is that it's not a trade-off -- that is, you don't get the special issue *instead of* the typical two-year old behaviors, you get the special issue *in addition to* to typical behaviors. I think that is what makes it hard for outsiders to understand -- they see *normal* behavior because normal behavior is there, and that makes them discount claims of anything different.<br><br>
Do a search on MDC for this topic -- its been much discussed in recent months. The best book on the subject for parents (as opposed to professionals) is The Out of Sync Child by Carol Stock Kranowitz.<br><br>
I'm sure other mamas will be chiming in soon. Sensory issues are common to a lot of disorders, in addition to being a stand-alone problem for some.<br><br>
Tara
 

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My ds was diagnosed with sid in 2002 when he was three, so not much older than your dd. He was never very spirited, he seemed to withdraw from everything. He was constanly overwhelmed and shutting down. The same things bothered him immensely-the seams in socks, even if one was scrunched or folded more or less than the other. He's always been very hypersensitive.<br><br>
We first brought our concerns to his pedi who recommended us to an OT for evaluation.<br><br>
It could only help, if only to set your mind at ease. You'll feel much better having a plan.<br><br>
HTH
 

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There is a new book out about Sensory Integration Issues. I forget the title but I saw it at the book store just the other night. If I remember the title I will post it here.
 

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My dd has DSI (sensory integration dysfunction) and she is a handful.<br>
But that is not the sensory stuff--that's the two year old stuff.<br>
I don't know about your two year old, but here are some of things that are issues with my child: she has issues with ANY food texture that is pudding-like (yogurt, applesauce, pudding, oatmeals,etc., won't TOUCH cereal that has milk on it). She won't drink juice. It took us months and months to get her to drink anything other than water.<br>
She has had feeding issues since she was a baby. A lot of sensory kids have feeding issues. But she had reflux and that compounded the problem.<br>
For a LONG time, she was terrified of water (but would drink it in a sippy cup--wouldn't touch a bottle, and was only breastfed for two months--we had to feed her in her sleep with a bottle). Couldn't handle bells, trains, traffic, the phone ringing, any kind of music that had chime sounds (again, bells), hated human singing, etc.<br>
Won't touch sand, dirt and can't stand getting her hands dirty with anything--food grease, ink, grass, etc. Most clothes make her nuts.<br>
She walked early, but still isn't talking (just in the last week has started speaking one syllable words--cup, milk, dog and cat--and she is 27 months old). I think that the speech delay is more due to the feeding issues than the sensory stuff....although, who knows?<br>
If you think your child has sensory issues, contact your local school board and ask them about Early Intervention.<br>
My dd was in EI since she was six months of age, initially for feeding, with an OT, but now she's in EI for speech (and OT again, soon, due to more sensory issues).<br>
For a long time we did the Wilbarger protocol, which is a type of brush/joint compression therapy, to help her deal with her DSI. If you get an evaluation, and it turns out that your child does have sensory issues--make sure that the OT knows what they are doing when it comes to brush therapy--otherwise, it won't be beneficial (of course, it won't physically HURT your child, but it will be a waste of time). That's probably more information than you need at this point--but I'm just trying to throw it all in there, in case you need this information somewhere down the line and revisit this post.<br>
On the positive side: almost all kids learn to cope with sensory issues, even if they don't get help (they learn to compensate)--and most adults who have sensory issues never even got therapy as children (it wasn't really written or known about) and function normally in the world. So getting your child help, even later in their life (for example, school age), is a start in the right direction.<br>
hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you for your replys and sorry it has taken me so long to get back here.<br><br>
My dd's problems definately don't seem as extreme as some of the things your children are dealing with, but I definately think something is not right with her. There aren't really particular things that she can't stand, but little things that bother her just build up through the day until she bursts it seems. She is *ok* I think in many ways but for me it is just exhausting trying to be one step ahead of her so I can keep things right for her. And listening to the screaming if I do "mess up" in some small way...I can hardly stand it some days. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/mecry.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="crying"><br><br>
So how do you get a diagnosis of sid? What is the evaluation like? And the treatment options?<br><br>
Thanks again. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br>
Beth
 

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Beth, I also want to encourage you to get your child evaluated. I had concernes from birth practically, through the 2's and now we are in the 3's and my dd is getting worse with some things that I thought were maybe just being spirited.<br><br>
What finally pushed me was (a) seeing that dd's behavior is affecting the way teachers and peers treat her and (b) the fact that she drove dh to give her a spanking. That really, really bothered us and made us realize that traditonal discipline just doesn't work with her and we need help before she gets totally out of control.<br><br>
On Tues. I took her to a child psychologist for the first time and she talked to me and observed dd and confirmed my suspicion about some of her mannerisms not being normal and indicating some problems that need to be worked on. She also ruled out ADHD and said that she wants to talk with dh and I alone next week, and also spend some time on the floor playing with my dd before she comes up with any firm diagnosis and treatment plan.<br><br>
I feel sad that it's official, my dd has issues. OTOH I'm glad dh and I finally are getting dd some help, and hopefully we'll learn better ways to handle her emotions and quirks and get her off to a good start in life.<br><br>
Darshani
 

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Quote:<br>
So how do you get a diagnosis of sid? What is the evaluation like? And the treatment options?<br><br>
Beth,<br>
I already answered your question in my post--so refer to that as far as what we did for "treatment" (Wilbarger protocol--brush therapy) and to get an evaluation (contact your school board and ask about Early Intervention and ask for an OT to come to your house for an evaluation).<br>
HTH
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm sorry, but I can't imagine what brush therapy would be. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug">
 

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<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm sorry, but I can't imagine what brush therapy would be. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"></div>
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I can help with that one! Brushing therapy is pretty much what it sounds like -- a plastic brush with firm bristles (kind of what they use to wash babies' heads in hospitals, only firmer) run over the arms, legs, hands, feet, and back (never the front). This is combined with joint compressions. It "normalizes" the body senses by giving it the same sensations all over. You must have an OT show you how to do it, though -- this is one of the things that *will* do harm if it is done incorrectly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Oh thank you. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br>
I am still trying to decide what to do about this. We tend to stay out of the mainstream, take care of our own and don't rely on professionals wherever we can. I don't know if I want to expose her to evaluations and possibly be forced into treatments that we are unsure of. Might be worse than doing what we are already doing, yk? I guess I'm just wondering if the evaluation process is uninvasive and gentle. I would not be ok with any forced seperation from her or anything like that. I suppose it would depend upon the doctor you are working with?<br>
Our children aren't in school (we homeschool) so would I actually go to the school on this? The children are on Medicaid so would the medicaid office perhaps be able to help me find someone? I guess I could just call them and ask, lol. I was just wondering if a physician evaluates the children or a psychologist or someone completely different.<br>
Thank you all so much for your time on this. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br>
Beth
 

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Hi Beth,<br><br>
I just skimmed through the Out-of-Sync Child and my 5 year old definitely seems to fit into the description of a child with sensory integration dysfunction. She has always been an anxious, high-needs child from the moment of her birth.<br><br>
I feel the same way you do about taking care of our own and not relying on professionals whenever possible. We also homeschool. I feel that we are very sensitive and responsive parents and usually react to her sensitivies in ways that are recommended in the book. Reading the book definitely reminded me of how important this is.<br><br>
I'm wondering how important it is to seek treatment. I wouldn't want her to conclude that there must be something wrong with her. She has a heathy self esteem at this point and i would like to keep it that way.<br><br>
I'd love to hear if you've come up with any plans to deal with your own child, with or without a professional. And would love to hear from anyone else how important you think treatment is and what exactly treatment entails.<br><br>
Many thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hi, Kate. Thanks for chiming in.<br>
My dd is just so very sensitive and tender that I can't see exposing her to the scrutiny of someone she doesn't know and then subjecting her to whatever treatments they prescribe. I definately think she is better off dealing with just us.<br><br>
We have narrowed down at least part of what gives her issues...dairy. We have taken her off of dairy and her days are now much smoother. So if you haven't already done it I'd suggest looking over your diet for possible problems. I was also looking into food dyes and such, but cutting out just the dairy has helped immensly.<br><br>
I am dealing with her swings and moods much better than I was when I first posted this. Something that helped me alot was to just start considering her to be *special needs*. Wether she has some *condition* I don't, and won't, know, but I do know, just from living with her, that she is a very sensitive person and that alone is reason enough to tread lightly with her. So basically just a change of mindset is what has helped me to be able to flow and work with her more. This has really changed things too. Where she used to freak out when something went wrong and shut us off, she now consistantly communicates to us what is going on and tries to work with us. There is a deeper connection there between us because of my attempts to understand and empathize more.<br><br>
So those are the two things that we have been doing and are having some success. She is, and I think always will be, sensitive, but for us its just a matter of working with her instead of against her. I am going to have to get a copy of that book to look through. Who is the author?<br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br>
Beth
 

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Wanted to add that Sidney Greenspan (THe Challenging Child is one of his books) deals with SID a lot and has a lot of strategies for dealing and helping kids get along in the world. I found the aforementioned book particularly helpful to deal specifically with SID issues.<br><br><br>
p.s. I mention Greenspan on this board a lot as I see posts re: issues that I do believe he would be helpful with, but no one else ever seems to have read him or heard of him. I find this hard to believe given his work with kids with special needs and am puzzled. So here's yet another post recommending him to a parent dealing with such issues with their child.
 

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jempd, I know Greenspan very well, have seen him speak several times (I live in the DC area). He is very well respected. I agree with you!<br><br>
I haven't read this book but will look into it. Thanks for the recommendation.
 

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I've read two of Greenspan's books -- The Challenging Child and The Child with Special Needs -- and thought they were interesting. By the time I read them, though, we were already doing a routine that incorporated some of his suggestions (including floortime), so he's not a resource I have turned to again and again. I agree that he's good, but I think maybe the reason he isn't referenced as often here is that many people are asking for specific, practical suggestions, and his stuff just didn't have a "solid" feel to it the way Kranowitz's stuff does. That's not a criticism of Greenspan (like I said, he is good); just an explanation of why I don't think of him immediately when someone wants targeted help. (Of course, if I'd found him earlier in our journey, I would probably feel differently -- I think we usually remember the first ones to say something new to us more than those who seem to "repeat" simply because they are read later.)<br><br>
Tara
 

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Thanks, Lovebeads and Thoesly. I do like Kranowitz too. It is a good reminder to go back and reread her. I must say it's good to get a response re: Greenspan.<br><br>
Also, I would point out that he almost always writes a book with someone, and different ones are written with different people i.e. I think they vary in specificity and quality. For example I think First FEelings: Emotional Milestones for Babies and Children is one of the better ones and a great book for ANY parent to read, not just those of children with special needs. I have not actually read (I can't remember the exact title) the one specifically for parents of children with special needs, with "Special Needs" in the title.
 
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