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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going to get my 7 YO DD evaluated hopefully soon. She was diagnosed with ADHD but she has quite a bit of sensory issues.<br><br>
Anyway, my question is, are meltdowns common with kids with sensory issues? Today in particularly was pretty bad. I had to brush her hair (one of the things that she hates). As I was brushing her hair, as gently as I could, she was crying and screaming. You'd think I was beating her <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> After I finally got done with her hair, I asked that she get dressed, since we were having company. She cried and screamed saying that she hates getting dressed.<br><br>
Is this common? If so, how do you handle these meltdowns?
 

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Very common.<br><br>
With ds, my approach varies depending on the situation. Some things that he tends to get anxious about (resulting in a meltdown), like a doctor or dentist visit, I don't tell him about very much in advance, so he doesn't have as much time to worry and build up tension. I don't avoid every meltdown this way, but they're often shorter and less intense. Other anxiety situations we give him plenty of warning on, so he has time to brace himself -- like going to a loud, chaotic playdate or a birthday party.<br><br>
Some things he gets frustrated about (resulting in a meltdown), I give him more leeway on than I would otherwise. He doesn't have to wear underwear; or he can stay in his pajamas all day; I'll wait until he's asleep to brush his hair. Others, I draw a firm, concrete line on rather than negotiating or reasoning or explaining. He does have to stay in his carseat, end of discussion. We do have to hold hands as soon as we leave a building, because the last time I held the door for someone else, he ran into the road. End of discussion. With things like that, as much as I want to be able to talk it out and come to an understanding, when he's feeling frustrated he really doesn't want to have a conversation. He needs to hear the rule and for that to be it. We can talk it out later. He's more like to lose it if I keep talking than if I just state what's going to happen and create the physical reality we need (i.e. pick him up and put him in his carseat, take his hand and not let go).
 

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I can totally relate! My son hates to have his teeth brushed. It is a nightly battle with lots of screaming and crying. It's rough!! After we are done he usually runs into his closet and finishes his fit in there. I just leave him be until he is done.
 

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it's normal here. we've got some explosive behavior instead of meltdowns but it's the same story. it's a pick you battle situation.<br><br>
she's 7, can she do some things on her own? i have DS help wash his hair and it's made it much easier for him to deal with. could she pick out her own clothes so she's excited to wear them? did she really have to change for guest?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the input. It just gives me more "confidence" to have her evaluated..I wasn't sure if this was typical behavior for sensory issues. I'm going to also report this to the OT as well.<br><br>
Meg, I definitely do let her do most of the things on her own. I found that it really helps with the fits. I brushed her hair this time because it was a lot of tangles. We were going out to eat so she did have to get dressed (and usually at home, she refuses to wear clothes, so she was just in a tshirt and underwear).<br><br>
Lilypie, that's exactly what I did with Kalynn. I just let her finish her fit and she was fine. I just wasn't sure if there was something else that I could do.<br><br>
earthmama, that makes a lot of sense!
 

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Hi there,<br>
I thought I would offer what works for us regarding hair brushing. I get my daughter to do the same 'Lamaze" breathing which they taught me all those years ago during labor and birth. It is a kind of constant puffing exhale for each time I brush the hair, and I get to hear the sound of my daughter exhaling the air. So each time I brush, there should be at least 30 noisy puffs. That helps to reduce the pain and helps her to be pro-active in the process rather than suffering. does that help?
 

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We did a "brushing program" that we got from our OT. My son had issues with everything from bathing to clothing (basically anything that touched his skin). The brushing program was really helpful and might be something to look into to help with the sensory intergration.
 
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