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My 5 year old seems to hit alot when we go into a social situation with adults, like his uncles and grandparents. Its not a "aggressive" hit, its more like a playful hit. But, to me it seems like he does not know how to process what they are asking him "(questions and the like) so he figures he will hit and be playful that way. Here is a situation:

Uncle: Hey Dorian!
Dorian: No answer
Uncle: What you been up to?
Dorian: Peeing my pants

Then usually comes the hit or attacking from my son to the uncle.

Does that make sense? I have tried to get him to calm down but he goes into a hyper state it seems.
 

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I don't really have an answer, but didn't want to not reply since no one else has yet....


Could it be that DS is attempting to be silly and tickle, rather than outright hit? Our 4YO sometimes gets rowdy and hits with his fingers wiggling so from the outside it might look like just hitting....but his tone and body language say a different story.

Sorry I cannot help really!
 

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When ds is sensory overloaded, he tries to *control* the sensory stimuli. To a young child, that often is withdrawing from the stimuli, or initiating physical sensory input in a repetitive manner.

So, if we are going to have a lot of sensory stimuli like a cacophony of sounds from a crowded party, we proactively do sensory games for 15 minutes several times throughout the day. It helps if we are very careful to avoid dairy, HFCS and artificial colors which decrease his ability to hear and consider other's needs. We try to plan activities for earlier in the day, plan some outside play time, especially swinging. Big tight, long hugs help in the midst of chaos to recenter. We also freely use Rescue Remedy (and/or Cherry Plum) Bach flower remedies before (and during) high stress situations.

Any frenetic rushing by me, amps ds up; and his sensory needs increase due to the decreased connection with me, as much as anything.

If you need more ideas for a sensory diet, I posted a bunch in another thread recently: http://www.mothering.com/discussions...ry#post9227924

HTH, Pat
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by WuWei View Post
When ds is sensory overloaded, he tries to *control* the sensory stimuli. To a young child, that often is withdrawing from the stimuli, or initiating physical sensory input in a repetitive manner.

So, if we are going to have a lot of sensory stimuli like a cacophony of sounds from a crowded party, we proactively do sensory games for 15 minutes several times throughout the day. It helps if we are very careful to avoid dairy, HFCS and artificial colors which decrease his ability to hear and consider other's needs. We try to plan activities for earlier in the day, plan some outside play time, especially swinging. Big tight, long hugs help in the midst of chaos to recenter. We also freely use Rescue Remedy (and/or Cherry Plum) Bach flower remedies before (and during) high stress situations.

Any frenetic rushing by me, amps ds up; and his sensory needs increase due to the decreased connection with me, as much as anything.

If you need more ideas for a sensory diet, I posted a bunch in another thread recently: http://www.mothering.com/discussions...ry#post9227924

HTH, Pat
Wow, this was a very helpful post to me to understand how sensory activities help kids. Thanks!
 

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Sorry, I didn't see your post. My dd who is 5 is the same way. She will even do this with us. She doesn't hit every time, but will do the ignoring thing and then will get enraged by the time we get to "what have you been up to?" or if we ask another question. She is for sure overstimulated and gets very annoyed with us and will growl or scream at us and sometimes have a tantrum. She can be totally calm and do this if we even say hi or I love you. Sometimes she is fine and othertimes watch out! It for sure gets worse around even just a couple other people. She is comfortable with certain family members and will only give hugs or talk if she feels comfortable and is calm. I have come to the point that I don't pressure her to hug or talk to people or us, even if it seems rude. I want her to find it enjoyable, not something to be dreaded. It is just too much for her at times. Usually people want to talk to her when she first gets somewhere or when we get home from work and such and she is just starting to get comfortable with the transition, so she needs time before she can relax and talk or cuddle. My dd has pddnos and has a lot of social anxiety, but I think like other people have said it seems more of a sensory issue. My dd is hopefully going to see an OT soon. I'll let you know if we find out anything that is helpful from her. I think Pat's ideas are very helpful and what is recommended.
 

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I'm far from any kind of expert or even experience but it sounds to me like this is possibly his way of handling a social situation that is just too much. It sounds smart and adaptive to me; but of course he'll need to find another way. But I can just see that he figured out how to distract from what he struggles with but still interact with the person. Maybe I'm reading too much into it.

In terms of sensory. When Andrew has had too much input sensory and just emotion wise he attacks. His does seem like anger or frustration though. But it is definitely he's reached his over-load point and is falling apart. Different though than I think you're dealing with.
 
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