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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm curious...someone (my Midwife!!!) recently tried to tell me that using a diaper service does more harm to the environment than using regular disposables.<br><br>
FYI, this was in the context of discussing the use of cloth diapers for a WOHM. I had already busted out a fuzzibun for how and tell and got nowhere, so I was just saying that if someone really had no time for washing, they could always use a service.<br><br>
This person (again, she's my midwife, which kind of annoys me), said that he husband is an environmental scientist and therefore, she knows that the damage done by a diaper service to the environment is much worse than just using disposables.<br><br>
This doesn't make any sense to me. Maybe if you just compared the end products--ie landfill (for sposies) with earth/water pollution (for the service). But I think if you consider the energy/cost of making those weird chemicals that go into a sposie, then in total, that must be worse.<br><br>
What do you think?<br><br>
Jessi
 

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I agree with you. I think your midwife is grossly misinformed. AND if she really thinks about it, washing them yourself is better than BOTH of those options. By the way, that would bother me too that your midwife is pushing for sposie use. But I guess you can't have everything huh?<br><br><br>
Meg
 

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Jessi,<br><br>
It is true that using a service will do more damage than washing at home. Diaper services use bleach and harsh detergents, which they have to because all the diapers from all the babies are mixed up together. They also do something like seven water changes in the process so the bleach is all rinsed away and you are left with soft pure cotton.<br><br>
However, it's still better than sposies. The bleach using is not cool, but it's better than dumping piles of diapers in the land fills, and the byproducts of sposie production are worse than bleach. Not to mention what goes against your baby's skin.<br><br>
Darshani
 

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The diaper service in our town puts the dipes through 13 cycles, and uses lots of bleach.<br>
The other issue is the truck going around and picking up and delivering the diapers.<br>
But still, it has to be better than using disposables.
 

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I would still choose cloth <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br><br>
Wash them yourself....it is easy <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I guess she's factoring a lot in with the service... like the cigarettes the driver smokes, and the gas he uses when he's driving, and the wrappers he throws out the window after snacking....<br><br>
Either way, I think the it ranks 1... cloth at home 2... service 3... disposables.
 

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We used a service for our first for about 6 months. They didn't use any bleach and used natural detergent. They never washed one customer's diapers with another's. We never had any rash problems. It was probably more pricey than using generic disposables, but very convenient and a good transition into buying and washing our own diapers. He was tiny, and they had preemie prefolds and let use use prowraps preemie covers without having to actually purchase them. They also loaned out prowraps newborn covers. We didn't have to buy any until ds was in smalls. That's kinda OT, but show how we still saved money using a service.<br><br>
I called a local diaper service recently just out of curiousity (ended up being too expensive), and they said they use Bio-Kleen. There may well be some services that use harsher detergents and lots of water, but that's not true across the board.
 

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As the pp said, the enviro impacts of using a service really depend on the service's wash/dry routine, energy provider, distance from you, and efficiency of trucks that they use to pick/up deliver the diapers. Enviro impacts of home washing CDs depend on what kind of CDs you buy, your wash/dry routine, and your energy provider. And even sposies vary in their enviro impacts - probably chlorine bleached conventional sposies are worst, followed by 7th gen and tushies, and g-diapers. This is one reason why it's so hard to pin down which kind of diapering is best for the environment. And also, the different environmental impacts are like comparing apples & oranges. For example, sposies obviously fill up the most landfill space, but how do you directly compare the amount of landfill space occupied by used sposies with the water & energy used to wash cloth dipes? It kind of comes down to which enviro impacts and other characteristics of a diaper are most essential to each person, what's available where you live (water, green energy, good or bad service), etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well think about all the trucks that deliver the sposies to the store. ANd all the times you'd have to drive to the store to get them.<br><br>
As it happens, we got into this conversation because my midwife's daughter is pregnant and planning to use disposables. I think my midwife is feeling a little defensive. She herself cloth diapered all 4 of her kids (including two while living on a homestead where she hand washed them in one of those crank-washers) so she's pretty hard core.<br><br>
Anyway, thanks for the feedback.
 

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Even if that were true they are still better for the baby so I'd defer to my child's health.
 
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