Mothering Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
885 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<p>This question came up on another chatboard, and everyone had slightly different answers. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>If a woman has a c-section, what's the minimum amount of time between births for a VBAC? My midwife told me two years between births, but another midwife mentioned waiting 2 years to conceive the next child. Help settle this debate?</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
<p>It's not that easy although I wish it was.  There are no magic numbers for this.  It depends on the woman and her health and why she had a c-s.  I would recommend at least 17 months but a woman can have success with a year or less.  I am planing my vba3c this july and I waited about 19 months but planned on doing it at 17.  There is a lady on another forum who is only a few months PP and is pregnant and wants a vbac. </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
<p>The timing of subsequent pregnancies is related to the risk of uterine rupture.  It is defined by the time between births.  When babies birthdays are less than 18 months apart, there is an increased risk of rupture.  Once the birth dates are more than two years, there are no further advantages in reducing the risk of rupture.  In general there seem to be some nutritional values to mom and babies when the birth dates are more than two years apart, particularly when breastfeeding, but the differences are small, and personal choice should play a role in determining the best spacing for your family.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,410 Posts
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Haelmoon</strong> <a href="/community/t/1349167/settle-a-debate-how-long-between-c-section-and-the-next-birth#post_16928811"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><p>The timing of subsequent pregnancies is related to the risk of uterine rupture.  It is defined by the time between births.  When babies birthdays are less than 18 months apart, there is an increased risk of rupture.  Once the birth dates are more than two years, there are no further advantages in reducing the risk of rupture.  In general there seem to be some nutritional values to mom and babies when the birth dates are more than two years apart, particularly when breastfeeding, but the differences are small, and personal choice should play a role in determining the best spacing for your family.</p>
</div>
</div>
<br><br><p><img alt="truedat.gif" id="user_yui_3_4_1_2_1333019508127_163" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/truedat.gif"> This is an evidence-based answer. <a href="http://www.childbirthconnection.org/article.asp?ck=10211" target="_blank">http://www.childbirthconnection.org/article.asp?ck=10211</a> <img alt="thumbsup.gif" id="user_yui_3_4_1_2_1333019508127_301" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/thumbsup.gif"></p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
491 Posts
<p>Generally , one should always have about 2 years space between deliveries , but that goes for any woman , not just vbacs .</p>
<p>There is an old midwife´s saying " it takes the body 40 weeks to be pregnant and 40 weeks to become un - pregnant again "</p>
<p>It is simply too draining for the system , if pregnancies are too close to each other .</p>
<p>That said , I had my first ( planned and necessary due to fetal malposition ) cs in 97 , then got pregnant despite birth control about 5 months after that and even though , I ended up having another one because my baby got stuck on the way out , never had any problems with my scar .</p>
<p>Then got pregnant , when number 2 was 1 year and 6 months and had a normal , uneventful delivery and another one 3 years after that .</p>
<p>Third cs in 2010 , due to a horrible finnish hospital doing EVERYTHING wrong , one possibly could and ending up with another cs because of fetal heart problems .</p>
<p>Got pregnant exactly 9 months after that and just had a wonderful and absolutely uneventful delivery , without my scar acting up even once . </p>
<p>So , anything is possible , but the longer one waits and gives her scar time to heal , the higher the chance of things going well , of course </p>
<p> </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,233 Posts
My c-section is not typical, as it was done to save my and baby's life when I was just under 26 weeks pregnant, so I didn't have the full 40-week stress of a pregnancy on my body. I visited with three OBs (including our regional VBAC guru who has helped women VBAC twins, breech, etc., I've heard) and a midwife, and the VBAC guru generally recommends a woman wait 9-12 months to conceive again, so 15-21 months between deliveries. I asked him in my case when I could try for a pregnancy and have a VBAC, and he said, "now." (This was in March when I was just under three months postpartum.) I was not breastfeeding and had healed wonderfully with no issues, so DH and I went forth with our TTCing plan and are in the 2WW.<br><br>
My next pregnancy will have to be highly monitored due to the random complications last time, but if I make it to 37 weeks, I'm going to try for a HBAC, with the full support of my midwife and two of the three OBs. (The third one was the doctor who delivered Jonathan, at a large teaching hospital, so of course he's going to recommend the hospital.) But even the delivering doctor, who would know best of the three of them what my surgery was like (although I got my op report and let the other two look at it), said that I could get pregnant again after three months. He said that at my 6-week checkup, though, so I'm not for sure if he meant three months from delivery or three months from my 6-week checkup or three cycles or what.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,233 Posts
If I go to 40 weeks with this newly-baking bean, I'll have exactly 13 months between my c-section and this birth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,085 Posts
<p>Different studies have different outcomes so it depends on the study you look at and the "risk" you are willing to take. </p>
<p> </p>
<p><a href="http://romancathanachronism.typepad.com/ican_somerset/2008/07/is-it-risk-to-v.html" target="_blank">Here</a> is some info on the studies.</p>
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top