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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wasn't sure where to put this, but this seems like the best place.<br><br>
I'm just concerned about DD, almost 20 months, who eats maybe 2 packages of commercial baby food (not my fave thing, but if she eats them...) and maybe about 6 molecules of something like a strawberry, banana, olive, apple, etc. a day.<br><br>
This isn't an eating strike, meaning it's not that she's feeling ill or something. She's never eaten. She is nursing, fortunately, but I doubt my milk is enough for her to thrive on at this point.<br><br>
She's been seen by an early intervention person, but she didn't know what to suggest other than possibly weaning her (sheesh, grow a brain, lady) to see if she would eat then. I felt like she was doing "ok" until recently when she fell ill with some unknown illness that involved fever and probably nausea (no runny nose or anything, just the fever, lack of appetite, and general crankiness and not-feeling-well-ness). She's better again but I see she's clumsy and cranky, and I know that's how I feel when I haven't had enough to eat. But she won't eat! She is fairly interested in food and will nibble but spits out most of the real food (she doesn't spit the baby food but she has started to refuse eating it).<br><br>
I realize that this needs medical advice but I'm just wanting to hear if anyone has experienced anything like this, and what happened. We see a FP and he's a wonderful guy but not really that knowledgable about babies. We saw a ped before but we didn't like him or the other peds in the practice. So I feel like I need to figure out what is wrong BEFORE I consult a doctor, if I can. The doc has seen her for a well-baby checkup a month ago and wasn't concerned (I didn't express the level of concern I have in this thread - I wasn't that concerned then - but I did express some and he felt as long as she was nursing she was fine).
 

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i know many babies who had reflux and as a result have feeding aversions.<br><br>
i also know babies who have purely sensory issues and have issues with food texture, taste, smell, etc.<br><br>
does this help at all?
 

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We're going through something similar with DS (20 months). He'll eat a little bit of whatever food I'm eating but won't touch other stuff, including things you'd think he would be all over like toddler fruit snacks. He also hates juice and is quite atypical in his preferences. He will eat a few foods fairly regularly like goat yogurt or dried banana chips but only a few bites and then he starts refusing them. Also he tends to vomit very easily when I do get him to eat more than a few bites of anything, even though he's not sickly as a rule, which worries me too.<br><br>
I am very worried about it. His big sister had similar eating behaviors at this age and later turned out to have bigtime gut issues and food sensitivities when necessity forced her to turn more toward food (got pg with DS). I know DS has tendency to food allergies also and has even had low level anaphylactic reactions to a few items, so I'm not going to push him to eat anything he doesn't want to. I have no idea how to solve the problem as I doubt milk alone is enough. He's a scrawny little thing although not really underweight.<br><br>
We're seeing an environmental medicine specialist in a few weeks who knows a lot about alternative treatments to allergies (he also practices as a DAN physician and treats kids with autism; DD is seeing him too). I'm hoping to get this doctor to order some tests on DS to see if we can get a clue of what's going on and find out whether food sensitivities are behind his eating issues. Reflux is another possibility. I've noticed that DS can be quite passionate about demanding Tums, which we gave him a few times o boost his calcium intake.<br><br>
Sensory issues could also cause this type of eating behavior, I'd think, in which case seeing an occupational therapist with experience treating feeding problems might help. We may go this route but in our case I need to rule out allergies and gut issues first for peace of mind.<br><br>
I am sorry I don't have more advice, but I just wanted to sympathize as we're in the same boat and I know it can be worrisome.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks to both for responses.<br><br>
The Early Intervention therapist didn't seem to feel there was a sensory aversion, but I don't know if she might have been wrong. DD is interested in food, will pick it up and put it in her mouth, and chews a little bit too. It's hard to say if she's aversive to swallowing or if there's something else going on. It's almost as if she doesn't KNOW to swallow. She doesn't chew too much, though, and I've wondered if more teeth would help (she has 7, no molars).<br><br>
She's hypotonic, and I don't know if this affects her swallowing or even her chewing abilities. Her hypotonia is probably "benign congenital hypotonia" - she was late in gross motor development but she's not *alarmingly* behind, she does walk and well, though it's clear to me that she is still hypotonic (falls easily, etc.).<br><br>
Reflux I don't know about, she has never vomited and the days of spit-up are long, long over. I did read somewhere that reflux can occur without spit-up, so I don't know what the other signs are.<br><br>
Again, I just don't know what direction to go in. I am reluctant to totally trust any doctor and would prefer to drive any concerns or interventions if possible, though of course I would turn it over to the doctor if I had no other recourse. We don't push the food issue much with DD (so it's not a control thing), and one of the Early Intervention therapists (not the feeding one) applauded us for that, but I don't know if that's right either. I fear a GI tube is in our future, and if that's something that will help her, I want to do that -but I fear doing something like that without good reason would be counterproductive and don't know enough what to look into.<br><br>
Early Intervention is sending us a nutritionist next week, maybe we can wait till then...
 

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I would get a referral to a good Occupational Therapist. If you repost this in teh special needs forum you might get more replies.
 

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I totally hear you!! DS didn't eat until 22 months when we took him to a multi-disciplinary feeding team at Children's Hosp. He now goes through bouts of eating, then not eating and dropping weight. We were involved with OT through early intervention for more than a yr, then ST and OT therapy at the hospital twice weekly for 5 months, and now we are moving forward with medical testing. DS is scheduled for an upper GI scope next week, started Prevacid, and will also get a barium swallow test soon.<br><br>
Basically, I tell you my story to let you know that I don't believe there is any way to know ahead of time what the problem is. Either you need to go through a trial of some type of feeding therapy or get testing/medicine trial to rule out medical issues. Feeding issues are not always simple. Common causes are sensory, learning, reflux, EE, structural problems with the esophagus, poor muscle control or strength, but there are many other causes. Sometimes children have more than one cause. My ds isn't fitting into any of their usual "categories" and we're seeing the 3rd rated team in the US. It's still taking months to sort it out.<br><br>
For what it's worth, I took ds to 3 different pediatricians before we finally got a referral to the team at Children's--and this was when he was not eating at all, not even baby food and had not made any progress after almost a year of OT. The OT kept saying we needed to get med testing, but the drs just brushed it off because his weight gain was fine (he literally drank more than 20 bottles/day). Even when we finally got the referral, it was because I insisted. Nobody took my concerns seriously until we finally got to the feeding experts who immediately recognized that there was a problem. I think drs get so used to seeing overconcerned mothers that they are quick to say there isn't a problem when indeed there is. Sorry to drone on and on--I'm very close to this issue right now. Feel free to email me if you ever need to talk!
 
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