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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My DS will be 30 months in July. He has always been EXTREMELY verbal and is very advanced language-wise for his age.<br><br>
I've noticed recently, however, that when he gets excited about something, he stammers. Like when he wants to say, "Will you please mommy do X" he starts by saying, "W-W-W-W". Sometimes I've reminded him to slow down and tell me what he wants, but he doesn't seem to understand that yet. This only seems to really happen when he is excited or maybe even anxious about a new situation.<br><br>
My question then is: Should this intermittent speech problem worry me at this age???<br><br>
TIA for any insight/advice.
 

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It's interesting for me to read this, because my son does the exact same thing. He's 24 months and also very verbally advanced. It only happens occasionally when he's excited. I figured it was just part of him learning to speak. I'll be interested to hear what others have to say!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Truvie-Thanks for making me feel not alone. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Hopefully, we'll both get some good insight.
 

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OOOH, Here's something i can feel comfortable helping with (i'm so lost in the world of CD's it's not even funny!)<br><br>
Ok, credentials first, so you feel better...I'm a speech-language pathologist with 10+ years experience- the majority working with kids.<br><br>
Now for the info.....Children between 2-4 typically go through some level of "normal" stuttering or "dysfluency." As their language develops very rapidly, they can't always organize their thoughts, words and mouths to orchestrate a smooth delivery. for children with later language development, this normal period can come later.<br><br>
To differentiate stuttering from "normal dysfluency," look at the overall behaviors...if the repetitions are simple, like "w-w-w-w-water," and are not accompanied by stress, tension, unusual behaviors (e.g., blinking, facial grimaces, etc.), it's VERY likely "normal" and will resolve on its own. If other factors are involved, and it continues for a long period of time, a speech-language evaluation might be a good idea.<br><br>
I hope this helps! Please let me know if i made sense! If you are still concerned, please PM me!
 

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My nephew who will be 3 in July is going thru this too. It is a relatively new thing for him. His dr. said it was normal. He gets frustrated though. You can tell he knows what he wants to say, but can't spit it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
bobica-Thank you, thank you, thank you. I was not yet freaked out worrying about this, but I knew if it continued w/out me at least asking a few questions, then I would feel worried about it. This behavior does not seem to be associated with any other physical or tick-like thing, either. We were with a bunch of family this weekend and he seemed to stammer more-he was VERY excited all weekend, so I'm assuming that's what this was about.<br>
Whew-thank you. I will continue to watch this, though.<br><br>
lilmissmama-This is how I feel about DS-knows what he wants to say, but can't get it out sometimes.
 

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DS (31 months), just started doing the exact same thing! This weekend he saw DH edging the lawn and said, "Wh-wh-wh-what's Papa doing?" He's done it numerous other times over the course of the last few days too. I was a little concerned that he was starting to stutter, but it sounds like it's a normal thing for this age <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">.
 

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I'm so glad i could ease your minds!!! Keep an eye on those pesky gp's or other adults who may call attention to it- it can quickly become something your babe's could learn to do on purpose (the whole, any attention is good attention thing!). They're just so funny at this age!
 

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Us Too! Us Too!!!!!!!<br><br>
DS will be 3 in July, and a few months ago, he went through an *EXTENDED* "why" stage. Dd's "why" stage didn't last this long, so we were surprised that ds's did.....and we were getting comments from people about it.<br><br>
Then all of a sudden,he stopped with the "why's" and started studdering.....I could tell he was soooooooooooooooo frustrated,as all of us were. The studdering lasted about two weeks, and he is talking fluently and with great sophistication. He expresses himself very clearly,using very complex word structures and thought patterns!!<br><br>
Our jaws need to be picked up off the floor much of the time from either laughter(he has a GREAT SENSE OF HUMOUR) or from the "reality" of what he comprehends!!!<br><br>
Scary,amusing,and delightful-all at the same time!!!<br><br>
Give it time, and if he doesn't pass through this stage, pm the poster who is a speech path.<br><br>
I am most sure he is more than fine-probably just a very intelligent little guy who has a LOT to say and his brain is figuring out how to say it all!!!!!!!<br><br>
mp
 

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Hi all! I just found this on babycenter. It may be a bit more organized than my ramblings....<a href="http://www.babycenter.com/expert/toddler/toddlerdevelopment/2486.html?ccRelLink=&url=%2Fexpert%2Ftoddler%2Ftoddlerdevelopment%2F11629.html&xTopic=toddlerspeech&bus=content" target="_blank">http://www.babycenter.com/expert/tod...ch&bus=content</a><br><br>
PS- can anyone tell me how to make the pretty links in the messages???
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
mamapoppins-Thanks for your reply. And I hope you are getting some insight and encouragment from these replies, too-especially Bobica's insight.<br><br>
Bobica-Thank you! I read briefly the link you attached and it is really helpful. And your thoughts were not just mere ramblings to me! They were REALLY helpful.
 

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Hi,<br><br>
I've taught and babysat for years and I"ve seen tons of little kids do this. I wouldn't be worried at all. Oftentimes, their brains are working faster than their mouths can.
 

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Hi this is the first time I write something, I read a lot, but never wrote. I just wanted to say I understand and don't feel so alone about having a 3 1/2 yr old that started stuttering. I'm hoping that it will pass, cuz he does have a nice vocabulary and epressed himself quite well until this started. I wonder if the fact that he speaks french and has been learning english a lot if this has anything to do with it... I MDC, and glad to find support and answers here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
pikkumyy-Thanks.<br>
Kats-Glad you could find some support here. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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My dd is now 7 and still stutters or repeats herself occasionally. When this happens, I find it very helpful to let her know she has my FULL attention--I will look her in the eye and gently touch her shoulder as she is trying to tell me something. That really seems to relax her and her language is better.<br><br>
It's important to not rush your child--don't try to finish his/her sentences. Let your child know he/she has "all the time in the world" to say what he/she is trying to say.<br><br>
Stuttering is normal for kids this age--but if they feel pressured about it, then it can turn into a permanent problem.
 

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<a href="http://www.stutteringhelp.org/brochures/br_iytyc.htm" target="_blank">if you think your child is stuttering</a><br><br>
the above link is very good for how to talk to a child ( or anyone really , just adjust some things for adults) who is stuttering. and also how to tell if the disfluency is normal or not. i really like this website. my husband stutters and thinks the advice posted there is good too.<br><br>
and alo, i am not so sure impatience will make it a permanant problem. i think people who have a "true stutter" have a neurological problem that has nothing to do with encouragement or patience, but the patience does help dont get me wrong. i just mean that if someone has a "real" stutter, there is not alot that will change it, they will stutter into adulthood. again, alot of childhood stutering is normal and unpermenant like everyone else has said.<br><br>
there is just a myth that stutterers stutter due to some kind of nervousness, but it is simply not true. stuttering stresses them out, therefore a relaxed atmosphere will help get through the "blocked" words.
 

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Just a word from another SLP, A&A had great advice. It's best not to rush a child when he's having trouble getting words out, and also try not to tell him/her to slow down. Simply stop what you're doing and give your full attention, waiting patiently without interrupting. Stuttering may occur more when your child is competing for your attention, like trying to tell you something while you're washing the dishes, for example.
 

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Thank you guys so much for the information and reassurance, ds just started stuttering over the last couple of weeks. I don't think it frustrates him or anything, but I was concerned. Its nice to know how to deal with it and that it is a common developmental stage. Thanks! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Bearsmama</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My DS will be 30 months in July. He has always been EXTREMELY verbal and is very advanced language-wise for his age.<br><br>
I've noticed recently, however, that when he gets excited about something, he stammers. Like when he wants to say, "Will you please mommy do X" he starts by saying, "W-W-W-W". Sometimes I've reminded him to slow down and tell me what he wants, but he doesn't seem to understand that yet. This only seems to really happen when he is excited or maybe even anxious about a new situation.<br><br>
My question then is: Should this intermittent speech problem worry me at this age???<br><br>
TIA for any insight/advice.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
If it's occasional and only in excitement....coming from someone who has worked with kids with different delays and some speech problems for awhile, I would not worry about it. I think sometimes their brains think up things faster than their mouth can move.<br>
If it goes on more than a couple months, or your son seems to get more and more nervous, distressed, it happens more often, then I'd go get a speech eval.<br>
Just my 2 cents.
 

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FYI: this original post appears to be 17 months old. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br><br>
Pat
 
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