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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Most of you know that I have a dd with lots of complex needs, and an older dd w/some anxiety issues, so going three for three isn't really what I want! But . . . I don't want to be ignoring something if I shouldn't be.

Ds has always been what dh and I fondly refer to as "quirky". As an infant, he hit all his developmental milestones, but just sort of atypically. He rolled over exactly one time at about 4 months old . . . and didn't do it again for months. He crawled at 9 months, walked at 12 months, and didn't have more than two words until he was almost three. He has intense focus in the areas he cares about (fossils, rocks and animals) but little to no interest in other areas. At 10 years old, he still can't consistently follow a two-step direction. He is incredibly forgetful, and these things are starting to impact his schoolwork. And the thing that keeps making me think something is up is that he lines up his toys. All the time. And has since I can remember. Lines of plastic dinosaurs. Lines of legos. Lines of Lincoln Logs. His bedroom is basically a series of lined-up stuff. He can and will play creatively with things, but it still strikes me as odd. He has a hard time reading social cues and often laughs inappropriately, especially if he is being disciplined. He cries very easily. He seems to have a couple of repetitive activities that don't seem exactly age-appropriate, like bouncing a ball off the wall -- which he can do for a really long time!

I guess it's not any one thing in particular, just a connection of everything and a sense of "hmmm" on my part. The thing is, he does well in school (well, has until recently), he has friends and does well in extracurricular activities like scouts and camp and things. So does it matter to know if there is something particular going on, or is it enough to just say he's quirky and leave it at that?
 

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If he is adjusting well within your family, in his school, with friends, etc. I wouldn't worry about trying to find a diagnosis. I would let it come down to "just his personality".
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by my3peanuts View Post
If he is adjusting well within your family, in his school, with friends, etc. I wouldn't worry about trying to find a diagnosis. I would let it come down to "just his personality".

: I always tell parents the same thing...intervention is only necessary when whatever is going on is impeding the flow of everyday life and/or making things difficult for the person involved. If he's quirky, but a happy kid, leave well enough alone. He may have some underlying dx, he may not. If he's lapsing in his studies to the point that it's becoming a problem, then intervene, that is reason enough even for a "typical" child. If his studies pick back up and he's otherwise okay, I wouldn't stress.
 

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I think the things you are describing are spectrum signs (maybe attention instead or with that) but I'm assuming that you are probably aware of that. I see what the previous posters are saying. I do have a bit of a different take.

I think that most and probably all spectrum individuals, even ones mildly affected like your son would be if that is the issue, face struggles especially socially and in thinking or processing that could potentially limit them. For example, the reading of social cues. Being able to better discern social cues can help your son in future relationships so things go more smoothly and are less frustrating for him and, say, his future wife. We all have weak areas and in my weak areas I want to make sure I am strong enough that those weak areas don't limit me. I want that for my son too-actually, both my sons. I want him to feel successful. I do not think successful school/academic performance matters two hoots in terms of enjoyment of life or even success as an adult in the work fields. And there are fun things you can do with spectrum kiddos that help them get stronger in weak areas and can open their eyes to more joy. I guess my opinion is probably clouded because my only experience with interventions are floor time and RDI--both of which I do with my typical son who loves them as much as his spectrum brother. I am sure there are other inteventions which wouldn't be appropriate. And my spectrum son has made progress in his weaker areas. So I personally do think it is worth investigating. I'm also influenced because I've read a couple of books which included people who were diagnosed as adults and said they wish they had known as teenagers because it would have helped explain some of their struggles. Again, though, I see what the pp are saying about why intervene if the child isn't struggling at all. I guess I'd look closely at if the child is struggling somewhat and toward the future. And go with your mommy gut on whether to pursue.
 

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I don't have any practical advice, but my 2 yo also does the lining-everything-up thing
It's neat to hear of someone else whose son does the same thing! I wonder if my boy will also still be doing this when he's 10. I call him "Mr. Particular".
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I really do think he shows some signs of ASD, and in fact have thought something was up since he was a baby. For the first six months to a year of his life, I was sure that he was deaf or had some degree of hearing loss because he just screeched and didn't seem to respond well to his name or other things. (We called him Pteradactyl-boy
) He's somewhat grown into his quirks, and certainly no one is pulling me aside saying, gee, why don't you get this kid evaluated. I love him, quirks and all, and am so very hesitant about putting a label on what is essentially his personality.

I guess at this point, a few more months of wait and see isn't going to hurt at all. Are there resources or checklist I could look to for kids who are diagnosed with ASD at a later age? Is that even a possibility?
 

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If you think it's affecting his life, then maybe he needs to get evaluated. If he's doing okay and is happy then maybe he's just quirky.
 
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