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I have a 3 and a half year old who is diagnosed with PDD-NOS, Sensory Integration Disorder and Dyspraxia. She has been getting early intervention services since she was 11 months old. She was also found to be eligible for social security disability. We just moved into a new school district (in a new state) and I am trying to get her placed into the PPCD program. The PPCD program is a preschool for children with special needs. My daughter was found to be eligible in our last state, but we moved before an IEP/IFSP was developed.<br><br><br>
Since we just moved here, the school district decided to re-do all of the tests. Even though the last school district just did them 3 months ago. So they are not old at all. I was told that my daughter was gifted and they decided to do a few more tests. I am getting the feeling they are not going to make her eligible for the program because her intelligence is too high. This is the vibe I got from the school psychologist anyways... I'll find out more tomorrow.<br><br><br>
My question is, should I fight for eligibility? I think it is wonderful that she is so smart.. But there are some things she needs a lot of help with. Socialization being one of the major skills. She also has a lot of motor planning issues (dyspraxia). She is already getting OT 3 times a week and PT twice a week. So should I just let it go if they say no? Or should I fight it? I just want some opinions.. Honestly, the only thing I really worry about is the socialization. She struggles with that a great deal. She also needs structure.. which is something I struggle with at home since I am a single mom. As well as being a new grad student..<br><br><br><br>
Any input at all would be greatly appreciated. Thanks! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/joy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="joy">
 

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I think you should fight. The whole thing is that an IEP is appropriate if the issues "could have a negative impact upon education".<br><br>
It does not matter how intelligent a child is...if the child cannot function in a school setting because of her lack of socialization skills, then it is going to have a negative impact because the child has to be able to get along with his/her peers and also work with his/her peers.<br><br>
My son only gets IEP services for his speech and his current speech issue is articulation disorder. It is enough to keep him on an IEP through transition from pre-school to school ages services. This is with both the speech pathologist for the school and his IEP classroom teacher commenting that "he might be gifted based upon his receptive/expressive language scores". According to them, his receptive and expressive language scores place him on an almost 3rd grade level.<br><br>
Also, you have many children who are autism spectrum who are gifted, but need the IEP services to keep them functioning in a classroom setting even though they are gifted.
 

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Many special needs children are quite intelligent. Having special needs is not a reflection of intelligence. I'd fight like crazy if I were you.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>SpottedFoxx</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15439159"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Many special needs children are quite intelligent. Having special needs is not a reflection of intelligence. I'd fight like crazy if I were you.</div>
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I agree completely.<br><br>
My son has PDD-NOS/Autism (depending on who is writing the report), dypraxia, hyperlexia, and ablinism. He also scores at least two years above age/grade level in math and reading. We are not sure at this point if he is gifted (too young to accurately test), but he is definately academically advanced. However, he scores about 2 years below age/grade in social-emotional skills, adaptive behavior, verbal language processing, and motor skills.<br><br>
DS was in PPCD preschool for 2.5 years. He is now 6 and is in Kindy in the district's K-2 autism classroom, where he does acdemic work with the 1st and 2nd graders. He needs a highly structured classroom with lots of visual supports, individualized work, and social skills training. Also he gets ST, OT, and APE.<br><br>
In my state, if your child needs ST, OT, or PT services, she will qualify for the preschool program regardless of her intelligence.
 

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Her placement needs to consider her social, emotional, behavoral issues as well as fine motor, gross motor, speech, etc! Did their evaluation include observations of her peer interactions and observations from a teacher about how she learns in a group? Testing a child one-on-one can tell you the IQ, but not much else.<br><br>
What do they want to do? Do they have a regular preschool program they want to put her in? It is possible that a regular program with pullouts *might* be the right placement for her. My DD is similar to yours, but is 13 and mostly mainstreamed at school.<br><br>
Depending on exactly what they offer, I would agree to try it for a set number of weeks (4 or 6 or something like that) and then have another IEP meeting. I would want the next IEP meeting on the schedule at the end of the first IEP meeting. It will most likely need to happen in the fall and they may end up with a crazy "back to school rush" so getting on the calender early is a good idea.<br><br>
Then you can all evaulate what is working and what's not working.<br><br>
I'd also ask how many areas her IQ was tested in and what the spread was. I'd ask what the lowest score is (which may be hard to look at). Many spectrumy kids have IQ scores all over the board. There is a 35 point range from my DD's lowest score to her highest score. I wouldn't accept a single number, esp. if you think they are trying to blow you off.
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>SpottedFoxx</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15439159"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Many special needs children are quite intelligent. Having special needs is not a reflection of intelligence. I'd fight like crazy if I were you.</div>
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Agree with this totally!!!<br><br><br>
One of my DDs also has a PDD_NOS dx and a very mild CP dx. She is very bright (can read 2nd grade level+ at 4 yrs old), but her social skills are immature and she is fairly quirky (lots of sensory stuff).<br><br>
Many many kids with learning disabilities, physical disabilities, and ASDs are above average (or more) IQ--they still benefit from Spec.Education services.<br><br>
She has had EI and now is in the school systems PreK general Ed program on an IEP. She gets OT & PT weekly.<br><br>
Her cognitive testing at 3 showed a WIDE spread in skills - so was deemed an inaccurate test of her abilities- especially given her age. They stated they estimated that it was a low or way below estimate of her actual IQ since they did not finish the testing. Some of her academic/social/behavioral/physical skills were 35+ points higher/lower than the IQ guesstimate. The examiner stated it was common with ASD kids and 'young' kids. She thought DD was most likely above average intelligence given her speech (high ability) and abilities.<br><br>
In K they may 504 her since her academics are so good and she can function in a regular education classroom. They may also keep the IEP and put her on consult/TC. However, she will still get some support and accommodations in some way.<br><br><br>
Fight for services, I doubt you would regret it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I was right.. they aren't qualifying her because she doesn't meet TEA guidelines. I am so furious right now. Not too sure what to do next. Atleast I let that school psychologist know how I feel about the decision. sooooo mad. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>LenasMommy</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15440662"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I was right.. they aren't qualifying her because she doesn't meet TEA guidelines. I am so furious right now. Not too sure what to do next. Atleast I let that school psychologist know how I feel about the decision. sooooo mad. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked"></div>
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What are TEA guidelines? I am still somewhat new to this, and have been muddling through it for 3 years with DS2.<br><br>
Just because a child is bright/intelligent/gifted, does not mean that they will not qualify for an IEP. I think, especially at her age, that an IQ test should not be performed on the child. I think schools that say that a child is gifted/bright/intelligent/talented/etc...are just trying to get by w/o offering services and hope that you don't fight them.<br><br>
I would file to have a second opinion, by a person of your choice at their expense. I am sure if you start pushing the envelope so to speak, that they may give in..even though the school year is almost over that may work to your advantage, because you have all summer to get your ducks in a row and all the evals done and appeals, etc. so that when school starts in the fall again you can get it in place right away.
 

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That doesn't make sense. If she's not reaching the Texas Education Agency's (TEA) guidelines, then she should be receiving services as she is not performing at her age level.<br><br>
Do you have a team of docs who diagnosed your child? If so, enlist their help. Have them write reports on your daughter's diagnosis and what her needs are. If need be, enlist the help of an education advocate. I know a good one in NJ and I'd be happy to ask her if she knows anyone in Texas who could help you (just send me a PM). This is not acceptable! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">
 
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