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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm probably being paranoid, but: the last two times my ds has had his haircut (at two different places), the stylists have left slightly bleeding scratches at the back of his neck where the electric clippers nicked him. I just wonder how many other people they have also nicked, and if there is any chance for him to contract anything (hepatitis - which can live for 30 days in open air, other diseases transmitted through blood.) I don't know if they clean their equipment between clients, but tend to doubt it. Anybody have insight into this? As soon as we got home yesterday, I covered the scratches with betadyne.<br><br>
Thanks!<br>
Paula
 

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I would be concerned. In fact, I would mention next time when you make an appt. that you are concerned about the sanitization of the tools and see what they say.....if its not done, try another barber. I am not one to be all paranoid and sterile, but public tools and blood is not a good combo.
 

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Actually, they may be required by law to clean the tools between customers regardless of blood, so you should definitely make sure they are clean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I called the place that scratched him yesterday, and was told that they always disinfect their equipment between clients. IF I ever take him anyplace to get a haircut again, I'm going to watch them clean the equipment. I'm just skeptical that it's done every time when they're in a rush. My dh has lovely long hair, maybe that's the way to go w/ds!
 

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Early this summer, I took my dd to the pool. We were checking in at the front desk, when all of a sudden somebody noticed that her chin was bleeding. Apparently she had popped it on the edge of the counter. Anyway, we ended up at the doctor, I couldn't tell how deep it was and wanted to get her a stitch if she needed it. They ended up using a sort of purple glue.<br><br>
Point being, when we were there the nurse pulled out the hibiclens and the doctor said, "oh No No! Don't use antiseptic rinses! They cauterize the tissue and make it more likely to become infected. Plain ol' soap and water is best."<br><br>
Not sure if betadine might be less caustic than hibiclens, but there you have it.
 
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