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I'm curious (not my own kids here, my nephews). If a child is determined to have a very high IQ/be gifted it was my understanding that it would be unusual for a sibling to have "just" normal intelligence. Is this correct?
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sbgrace</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15359141"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm curious (not my own kids here, my nephews). If a child is determined to have a very high IQ/be gifted it was my understanding that it would be <b>unusual</b> for a sibling to have "just" normal intelligence. Is this correct?</div>
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Unusual isn't the word I would pick. The biggest factor in a child's IQ is their parents IQ, so kids who share the same parents have a high likelyhood of having similar IQs. It's sort of like height -- kids who are tall often have tall sibs. But that doesn't mean that it is "unusual" for a tall child to have an average height sib. It's a genetic crap shoot.
 

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I have two gifted teens. I do know their IQ's. One of them is slightly brighter than the other but I have never let on and challenge and enrich them equally according to their interests.
 

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I think it is more common for siblings to be within 10 points of each other in IQ.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Linda on the move</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15359455"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Unusual isn't the word I would pick. The biggest factor in a child's IQ is their parents IQ, so kids who share the same parents have a high likelyhood of having similar IQs. It's sort of like height -- kids who are tall often have tall sibs. But that doesn't mean that it is "unusual" for a tall child to have an average height sib. It's a genetic crap shoot.</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that"><br><br>
Most kids have siblings with similar test scores, but that doesn't mean that it is going to be true in every case. My sister is five inches shorter than me!
 

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It depends on what you mean by "high IQ." A child who is moderately gifted has a "very high IQ" but maybe not compared to a highly or profoundly gifted child. A moderately gifted child could easily have average or high-average siblings. There aren't many sibling studies out there. The only one I've seen stated in average, siblings were within 10 points. I believe that study was done by testing siblings of already identified children though. It wasn't exactly a fleshed out research project.<br><br>
Sibling order and personality can really alter how those abilities are displayed though. Both my kids scored equally on their school GATE test (they are in the same percentile but I don't have IQ numbers on them.) However, DD is an assertive, driven high-achiever. She very obviously gifted as opposed to laid back, social butterfly, certainly smart without seeming outlandishly so DS. He doesn't surpass her academically in any way but I'd say he's actually a more inventive problem solver and a faster learner (he just doesn't see any reason to go get MORE work when he's done. He uses his smarts to buy him more play time.) 2nd borns are often seen as less able but really it has more to do with personality and birth order than raw talent.
 

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It's a hard pill to swallow, but there can be huge differences between siblings, especially if you have parents/grandparents of many different intelligence levels. Both parents could be bright and one daughter might end up bright, but then the next daughter could inherit grandma's learning disability or something.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>connieculkins</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15360998"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">It's a hard pill to swallow, but there can be huge differences between siblings, especially if you have parents/grandparents of many different intelligence levels. Both parents could be bright and one daughter might end up bright, but then the next daughter could inherit grandma's learning disability or something.</div>
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Learning disabilities are not related to intelligence. There are a lot of gifted and "bright" people who also have a learning disablility.<br><br>
My brother and I have about a 25 point difference in our IQs. His is in the mid-150s (making him gifted) and mine is in the high 120s (making me bright, but not gifted). However we are both adopted, so although we were raised in the same environment we have completely different genetics. But it did make growing up with him stressful for me.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>connieculkins</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15361222"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm just used to learning disabilities being used as an excuse for why little Johnny didn't get a 130+ IQ score.</div>
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I don't understand comment this at all. Can you please explain what you mean?
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>connieculkins</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15361222"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm just used to learning disabilities being used as an excuse for why little Johnny didn't get a 130+ IQ score.</div>
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It is certainly true that LDs can make it harder for kids to show their abilities and to get accurate test results, but as Lollybrat said, it is perfectly possible to have a LD and still be gifted.
 

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My brother and I are within a standard deviation of one another, but we exceed the average of our parents' IQ significantly, and we exceed one parent by twice the amount we exceed the other.<br><br>
A little further back though, in at least one one side of our family, there are an inordinate number of profoundly intelligent people with specific gifts and talents that my brother and I also share.<br><br>
I have often wondered if my parents' childhoods (influenced by war and subsequent coping mechanisms of their parents including addictions and abuse) were the cause of a break in the otherwise historically/ancestrally sound chain of people of similar abilities. I think it is likely.<br><br>
The parent with the higher IQ did not suffer as severely as the one with the lower IQ (who was seriously malnourished as well as tormented), and they both have a few really uncharacteristic, bright spots in their abilities, which leads me to wonder about their childhood environment's influence as well.<br><br>
I was abused as well, but nowhere near to the extent that my parents experienced.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>connieculkins</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15361222"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm just used to learning disabilities being used as an excuse for why little Johnny didn't get a 130+ IQ score.</div>
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IQ and learning disabilities are totally different and based on totally different tests.<br><br>
Kids with Learning Disabilities (LDs) can have IQs the same as anyone else- high, low, and in between.<br><br>
LDs are found when there is a large difference in ability (IQ) and achievement (academic skills). IQ is measured by one set of tests, academic achievement is measured by a different set of tests.<br><br>
If a large gap occurs in any one of set academic areas (reading, math, written language, etc) between predicted ability and actual achievement than the child is often diagnosed with an LD.<br><br>
I worked with a lot of kids with LDs that were also gifted....and I worked with kids that had average IQs and LDs.<br><br>
Often highly gifted kids learn to compensate for LDs and sometimes they are 'missed' by the schools or manage to go long periods of time undiagnosed when they learn to overcome weaker areas.<br><br>
Most individually administered IQ tests (WISC, WPPSI) are mostly verbal/hands on/minimal written based responses. A written language, mathematical, reading disability should not greatly change scores. They are often done WITH academic testing (WJ III, GORT, KeyMath, etc)- which does involve a lot of reading, writing, and mathematical computation.<br><br>
Speech/language disabilities can affect the scores of IQ tests, but they also have IQ tests that are non-verbal for the physically handicapped or deaf (and can be used with the languague/speech difficulties) --so even that is not a reason for stating an LD severely depresses IQ scores.<br><br>
Also remember that traditional IQ tests do not check to see if a child is 'gifted' in areas of emotional, social, musical, physical, or a variety of other ways that a person can have gifts/above average abilities.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>whatsnextmom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15360663"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
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Sibling order and personality can really alter how those abilities are displayed though. .</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that"> this is so true in our house, too. My oldest is gifted in the ways people assume to look for giftedness- academic, constantly talking, and a lot of the down sides to being gifted (emotionally sensitive, etc.)<br><br>
His little brother is very gifted as well, but in radically different ways. He is very creative and intelligent, but displays it in weird and often wild ways.<br><br>
My oldest is TAG, has been IQ tested, etc. His little brother hasn't had any testing yet, but will for TAG at school next year.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>PreggieUBA2C</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15361487"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I was abused as well, but nowhere near to the extent that my parents experienced.</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"> preggieUB2C
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Thank you for the hug, Carmel. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sbgrace</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15359141"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm curious (not my own kids here, my nephews). If a child is determined to have a very high IQ/be gifted it was my understanding that it would be unusual for a sibling to have "just" normal intelligence. Is this correct?</div>
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I read the research somewhere <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">. It may have been in a book on google books. My recollection is along the lines that often sibs are within 10 points of each other, but it was certainly at a rate low enough that it was beyond a sure thing.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>carmel23</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15361540"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that"> this is so true in our house, too. My oldest is gifted in the ways people assume to look for giftedness- academic, constantly talking, and a lot of the down sides to being gifted (emotionally sensitive, etc.)<br><br>
His little brother is very gifted as well, but in radically different ways. He is very creative and intelligent, but displays it in weird and often wild ways.<br><br>
My oldest is TAG, has been IQ tested, etc. His little brother hasn't had any testing yet, but will for TAG at school next year.</div>
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Nodding here and to whatnextmom. It can look so different. I was reflecting the other day on how DD's more "standard" while DS is likely going to be the guy who underperforms through school and then just takes off when he's not hindered by the structure of school and expecatations.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>carmel23</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15361552"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"> preggieUB2C</div>
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Yes, hugs, preggie.
 

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Lets remember that in a purely academic sense (in this case academic referring to research oriented) that "10 point" difference can be quite a different span of people depending on where in the IQ score you plop it down.<br><br>
For example, if one sibling had an IQ of 100 it would be very, very likely their sibling was within 10 points (after all, an actual majority of people would be within the 20 point range). If, however, a sibling had an IQ of 150 while an IQ of 160 would be the same number of "points" away it would be much more notable within a societal context (and much more rare). I think while reporting sibling IQs it would probably be more relavent to say that most siblings would be within a certain # of percentiles.<br><br>
Once again, both academic and unresearched. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> talk about a contradiction.
 

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My siblings are all gifted, two parent sets though so I'll separate for that. My brother and I are both in the 160+ range while my sister is about 145 I believe. That is quite a difference but everyone still scores in a highly gifted range. To add to the anecdote, my brother and I do extremely (like, shockingly even for average students) poorly in academic settings while my sister gets straight As, mostly A+s (100% or above) consistantly.<br><br>
My step-siblings are also all gifted and, IIRC, all score within about 10 points of each other with the middle being the highest I believe. They all score right around the local gifted program's cutoff of 138. The oldest never went to a gifted program but is in a high school for academically talented kids and the other two attend gifted programs.
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Brothers and sisters are usually within five or ten points in measured ability. Parents' IQ scores are often within 10 points of their children's; even grandparents' IQ scores may be within 10 points of their grandchildren's. We studied 148 sets of siblings and found that over 1/3 were within five points of each other, over 3/5 were within 10 points, and nearly 3/4 were within 13 points. When one child in the family is identified as gifted, the chances are great that all members of the family are gifted</td>
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<a href="http://www.gifteddevelopment.com/What_is_Gifted/learned.htm" target="_blank">http://www.gifteddevelopment.com/Wha...ed/learned.htm</a><br><br>
This is Silverman's stuff.
 
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