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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have 3 children. I believe all 3 are gifted.<br>
Ages: 4, 8, 11<br><br>
The 8 has been screened for giftedness and scores in the 98 percentile - she also may have a mild LD - so twice exception. We had her tested privately, and it was a positive experience.<br><br>
My DS (age 11) is also probably gifted and it would not suprise me if he was a bit ADD (he has major focusing issues.....). He can reason like an adult and do mental math like nobody's business - yet his academic results are average. There are a number of reasons his academic results are lower than they should be....but most of them come down him being unfocud and "refusing to play ball" with the school so to speak. Example: they ask what 40X3 is, and ask that they draw a picture and write a paragraph to describe how he got the answer......he simply write "120" (an answer he has been able to get since he was about 6, btw) and moves on. Score:1/3 - he did not draw the picture or write the paragraph. Ugh!<br><br>
So, I am torn about whether to have him tested and where.<br><br>
I am torn about the value of testing because he seems to like school, so why stir the pot so to speak? I do not know if things would improve if he did test in the gifted range - the school is very small and lacking in services. Moreover, what if he did not test in the gifted range? His sister is identified....I am afraid this would be a blow to his self esteem. (His siter knows her percentile, btw, I am afraid he may end up comparing himself to her).<br><br>
OTOH, DS is coasting and probably not living up to his academic potential. Neither child is learning how to work , as they both get by very easily.<br><br>
I would like to test DS privately, but do not have the $$.<br><br>
I have spoken to the school about gifted testing...but their protocal is to give an <i>achievement</i> test (Wyatt) and if the child score high on their academic test to give the WISC. Well, DS does not score high on academic tests...so as far as they are concerned he has been "screened" out. Well I know the test they gave him is NOT a giftedness test, and could fight them on this...but am trying to figure out if i should.<br><br>
OK rant over<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> help.<br><br>
Kathy
 

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What is your reasoning for wanting him labeled or teseted giftedness? Is he not challenged in typical classroom settings? I have 4 children. My first is very bright, scores about 85% on achievement tests, yet is "weeded out". She is in honors classes (7th grade) and is excelling and challenged, thus no need to go any further.<br>
My second is labeled gifted. She scores consistantly in the 98-99% on achievement tests and thus was thoroughly tested and shown superior cognitive. She is in regular classes with a gifted pull-out, excelling and challenged. Without gifted pull-out, would not be challenged.<br>
My third is in the 2nd grade. He asks lots of questions and seems very bright. He took his first standardized test this year and scored in the 81%, thus weeding him out at this age. He IS challenged and excelling in the regular classroom. He is in the top reading and spelling lists.<br>
My point, if they are excelling and challenged, no harm no foul in identifying IMO.<br>
(BTW, my 4th is 8 months)
 

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I would look into testing him for ld's. It sounds like he isn't happy or challenged,to me. Underachieving, uncooperative behavior is classic signs of giftedness. You may not have a special program to put him into, but realizing that he is just as smart as his sister, would be helpful to everyone. Statistically, they should be within 5-10 IQ points of each other.<br><br>
Why are you worried about his ego? Just explain to both of them that it isn't how quick your brain is, it is how well you use it that matters. Perhaps it is how you are looking at your kids? (not meant to be critical, just a thought!!)<br><br>
I am not sure if I am making sense, I didn't get much sleep last night. Sorry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for your replies, mamas.<br><br>
I think i worry about his ego because I am his mother, lol<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> ; I think if I present it correctly it should not be a problem. When I think it about it, I have taken numerous IQ tests throughtout time and my number always changes.....so how he does on a test is really a snapshot of how he performs that day...that is all.<br><br>
I think the school has him pegged as a B or C student, even if he doesn't score enough to be considerred in the gifted program (what there is of it) - his numbers probably will be enough to make the school pause and wonder what is going on. Why isn't he performing up to his ability, ect.<br><br>
Would you go private for testing (even though it may be finacially diffiuclt) or would you fight the school on getting them to test him? I worry the school may put it off till fall - and I have heard it is harder to get accurate numbers out of older children.<br><br>
kathy
 

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Have you discussed with him WHY they're asking him to write out the 'how' of arriving at the answer? This is an evaluated skill, just as much as the answer (obviously based on their marking strategy, but it's also part of the pedagogy). Could it be that he's 2E and this is contributing to it - is it a can't or won't write out the answer?<br><br>
I understand your desire to have the teachers understand him better, rather than filtering their assessment of him through possibly inaccurate assumptions/conclusions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I would say there is a strong possibility he is 2E - dysgraphia and ADD. He HATES writing.<br><br>
The school has not wanted to test him because (I believe) his giftedness masked his limitations and and vice versus - resulting in a C plus student.<br><br>
These are just hunches, however strong hunches....he has never been appropriately tested.<br><br>
Kathy
 

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Is there a special needs coordinator? It sounds like it might be time to be "that parent."<br><br>
I would approach them with "I suspect dysgraphia and ADD. There is a substantive difference between what he demonstrates at home and what he demonstrates at school. Given that what he demonstrates away from school is consistent with the level demonstrated by his sister in IQ testing, I strongly suspect that the possible dysgraphia and ADD are suppressing his performance."<br><br>
Have you looked at what the IEP requirements are in your area? Most SDs or Min of Ed's will have the info online.
 

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I think the school has him pegged as a B or C student, even if he doesn't score enough to be considerred in the gifted program (what there is of it) - his numbers probably will be enough to make the school pause and wonder what is going on. Why isn't he performing up to his ability, ect.</div>
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Are his grades Bs and Cs? If his ability level (based on IQ score or similar) suggests that he should be capable of higher grades, it is unlikely the school will pause much on his behalf. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> They will likely say things like, "He simply isn't working up to his potential," or "He isn't reading and following the directions, thus is not achieving high scores on tests," or "He isn't paying attention in class." The burden of proof will likely be placed on you, to come up with specific examples of exactly how the school is falling short and causing his problem. If, indeed, you think this is what's happening. I speak from my 10 years of experience as a teacher in a public elementary school. Sadly, this is the way it usually goes.
 

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Okay - based on teachma's and joensally's responses (which are excellent, btw), why not go ahead and request testing for a suspected LD? From what I understand, anytime a parent requests testing the school needs to comply.<br><br>
They should administer an IQ test as part of this and you'd be able to skip the pre-req. of the academic testing before the IQ test for the gifted program. Seems like this could be a win-win......You get comprehensive testing and the school will need to consider the results in order to provide an appropriate educational situation for your ds.<br><br>
Yup, it's time to be "that parent!" <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I took a deep breath and wrote a carefully worded, yet friendly letter, asking for a thorough assessment. I asked that they reply in writing. We will see what happens<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br>
kathy
 
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