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I would like to substitute my son's modern toys for Waldorf toys. But he is use to playing with modern toys. How can I fix this?
 

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Some modern toys can be open ended and support creativity, different building toys... But the battery operated talking toys... I think they are an awful thing. Your kid will confuse play with getting entertained, and if he happens to fall into the world of imagination for a second, soon that toy talks again and makes sure he doesn't go that deep.
as much as I wanted to have only beautiful wooden toys in our house, it was unrealistic, no one in our family shares my passion... but one thing I was very stubborn about, talking toys are donated as soon as I can get to it without being rude to any giver.
Kids can get really upset about a toy missing, so I used to have a thrift store bag somewhere hidden, and if they didn't ask for the bagged toy for weeks, I knew it's safe to get rid of it. Later in their life I've just plain told them that you guys have so many toys, THIS particular kind I don't like in my house. We have received some action figures that literally reek like poisonous plastic, and I've told them that this is not healthy for you, and I would never let you play with it. This has lead to all kinds of conversations, "why would they put poison in toys?", "well because they only care about making money". "why does so and so's mom let her child play with poisonous toys?", "well because she believes, rightly so, that something like that could not be sold to children." I'm sure that my answers were mostly too much for a little brain to process, but somehow any answer that you stand firmly behind gets accepted eventually... Some may choose to say, because mommy says so, to protect the child's innocence from all the politics...
 

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I personally don't think it has to be that complicated. Maybe you are overthinking things. Just try to pick toys that encourage open ended play, like animal figures, simple dolls, dress up clothes, play food, match box cars, boats for the tub or splash pad, balls, crayons, paint and modelling clay. I'm not a Waldorf parent just dropped in here. You can start with something as simple as a stack of paper, some glue and maybe some scissors if the child has the coordination and then build anything you can imagine from there. I tried to get my son to follow a craft I did when I was little, tissue or quill flowers glued onto paper and he ended up making a model of the universe I kid you not. We watched A LOT of BBC type solar system documentaries (his choice) when he was very little. Even gardening, going for a nature walk, picking up rocks and feathers, counting turtles in a pond can be educational and fun and does not involve any toys at all. It's not the toy it's how it's used.
 

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We did this many years ago with our daughter. I found that the easiest thing to do was to gradually ease out of things. And to the previous poster's point, it also can depend on how old your child is. The younger the child, the easier it is to do. Often battery-operated plastic toys break quickly. When it breaks, out it goes! Then when new things get purchased, they are of a more natural quality, that can be used primarily with imagination. Also, when batteries die, they can just not be replaced. And so on and so forth. Slow and gradual can usually work well, so it doesn't seem like such an overnight type of transition.
 
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