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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My first grader is in public school, but I'm wanting to do some extra math with him at home. With the Singapore series, would i need to buy both the text and workbook, or would the workbook be enough?
 

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The workbook would definitely be enough. I had 1A for dd and ds. They flew threw it but didn't really "grasp" it, so I just got Math U See which is just great. I was going to sell my 1A text, if you want it, let me know.
 

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We got both this time because dd1 wanted to see what the textbook is. At least up through level 2, there is no need for it at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>chfriend</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7250708"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">NHF: I'm curious...how is the way it's approached different? It seems so straightforward.</div>
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Depending on how you were taught and/or learned math yourself, it might be straightforward.<br><br>
Then again, if you were taught that subtracting means "taking away" and that multidigit addition and subtraction require "carrying" and "borrowing", the Singaporean conceptual teaching is quite different from that.<br><br>
Singaporean math in Grades 1 & 2 lays the foundation for a deep understanding of place value and of the inter-relationship of the basic operations -- anticipating how they'll be used at the level of fractions/decimals and algebra and so on. What an American teacher might describe as "carrying" is actually "constructing a unit of higher value", while "borrowing" is "deconstructing a unit of higher value." Subtracting is about finding the difference between two numbers, or about finding a part when you know the whole and one part.<br><br>
Miranda
 

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You beat me to it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>moominmamma</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7251173"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Then again, if you were taught that subtracting means "taking away" and that multidigit addition and subtraction require "carrying" and "borrowing", the Singaporean conceptual teaching is quite different from that.<br><br>
Singaporean math in Grades 1 & 2 lays the foundation for a deep understanding of place value and of the inter-relationship of the basic operations -- anticipating how they'll be used at the level of fractions/decimals and algebra and so on. What an American teacher might describe as "carrying" is actually "constructing a unit of higher value", while "borrowing" is "deconstructing a unit of higher value." Subtracting is about finding the difference between two numbers, or about finding a part when you know the whole and one part.</div>
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The textbooks are sparse, and, especially if learning math elsewhere, the child might not pick up on the subtleties of the methods and strategies. We came to Singapore from Right Start (after reading "Knowing and Teaching Elementary Mathematics" by Liping Ma, a book I highly recommend) and were fairly grounded in this style of math. I'm biased on the side of precision when it comes to talking about mathematical concepts.<br><br>
The benefit of the HIG for the parent is primarily help with presentation and terminology. It also contains ideas for illustrating concepts with manipulatives and using games to cement concepts.
 

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I've never used the instructor's guides-- I'm not saying they wouldn't help, but they're not 100% necessary. You can use just the workbooks, but you can also add on from there.<br><br>
How is it different? Well it's built on a pictorial --> concrete ---> abstract model whereas math in the US starts out with either concrete or abstract. There is a LOT more emphasis on mental math and math "tricks" as it were for the basic operations.<br><br>
Singapore kids do drills separately, so you will have to drill separately for the full singapore experience... we use the drillbook for saxon 5/4, for our drills They do 50 questions a day in drills, plus one singapore wkbk exercise.<br><br>
There is very little review in singapore, so sometimes we just repeat the same exercises or reviews over and over again until they get it.
 

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Cool. It sounds like I might have learned math more the way it's taught in SM....your explanations sound like the ones I make up for my dd. Thanks for the explanation!
 

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I tried Singapore for my DS2 when he was about 7. It had him very confused. I remember specifically a portion where the pictures showed that 9 + 6 is the same as 10 + 5. They wanted him to take all the addition "pics" and change them into 10 + whatever, and he just didn't get it at all.<br><br>
I don't think there's any "one-size-fits-all" for math. Everyone's brains work differently. All you can do is try the product and see. Singapore is so cheap that it's no biggy if it's no good for you.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>2tadpoles</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7253527"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I tried Singapore for my DS2 when he was about 7. It had him very confused. I remember specifically a portion where the pictures showed that 9 + 6 is the same as 10 + 5. They wanted him to take all the addition "pics" and change them into 10 + whatever, and he just didn't get it at all.<br><br>
I don't think there's any "one-size-fits-all" for math. Everyone's brains work differently. All you can do is try the product and see. Singapore is so cheap that it's no biggy if it's no good for you.</div>
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hmm, that might be great for my son since he already changes everything to 10 and adds from there....I have no idea where he got that. I ordered the textbook and workbook for 1b and we'll see how we like that. I also got the kindergarden math book. Can't wait to play with it.<br>
Lisa
 

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I got the textbook and work book for my 1st grader. Now that I have seen both, next time I will get the workbook and the extra practice book. I don't think the textbook is very helpful at 1st grade. I do use it with my 6th grader and really like it.
 
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