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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I made an appointment for my sister with my mw to get bcp. I am hoping to convince her young that mw's are the way to go. Please help me with ideas on convincing her to avoid OB's at all costs!<br>
Trisha
 

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perhaps i am misunderstood. she is not sexually active. I'm looking for reasons to choose a mw over an ob. whoever she starts with is who she will likely see through adulthood, and for pregnancy, etc. I'm hoping to start her off with the mw mindset and maybe she will decide when the time comes to have an intervention free birth. She's very squeemish, and doesn't like to be touched, probed, etc. I told her I chose midwives because they let me be in charge, and really knew who I was, spent time with me, answered questions, etc.<br><br>
Trisha
 

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uhhhh ok well for me, my idea of midwifery care is not to have pills thrown at a girl, yk? so... having her go to a midwife for birth control pills to set her up for a natural, holistic bit of care when she ever decides to become pregnant ~ it seems a little... counterproductive to me. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>klothos</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">uhhhh ok well for me, my idea of midwifery care is not to have pills thrown at a girl, yk? so... having her go to a midwife for birth control pills to set her up for a natural, holistic bit of care when she ever decides to become pregnant ~ it seems a little... counterproductive to me. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue"></div>
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ITA.
 

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Klothos/OTF: What would you recommend for someone with rough periods? I've had a couple of friends who absolutely loved their pills, because they went through such utter hell with their periods. Is there something else that will stabilize that?
 

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listen, i'm not knocking bcp ~ i take them, partly because of my own endometriosis ~ BUT: i wouldn't advise someone to go to a midwife because of rough periods!<br><br>
i would advise them to go to an OB/GYN, because <i>that is what they are for</i> ~ they're for the abnormal stuff. i believe in midwifery care for healthy, normal pregnancies and birth... but when there is a problem, or there is *potentially* a problem, i don't believe you should just ask a midwife to throw pills at it. if it *is* endometriosis, you have to know *exactly* what pills to take because some of them might make the problem <i>worse</i> ~ like what happened to me the first time i started taking them.<br><br>
when i finally had a thorough evaluation by a very good OB/GYN he found that i have endometriosis and cysts... i had a lot of tests done (some slightly invasive) and ended up having a laparoscopy, which is something that i'm pretty sure midwives aren't qualified to perform.<br><br>
i'm just saying ~ use midwives for what they're there for, but for *problems* why would you *not* go to someone who is better qualified to look into them?
 

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Ah - gotcha. I thought you were objecting to the pills in general. Thanks. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I have an OB that I'm happy with and he partners with a non-tradiational midwife. I have actually gotten a presciption for the pill to use to help me balance my hormones and get over PPD. They worked pretty well for that purpose, and also for my endo. I stayed in the pill for 3 mos. straight to allow my endo to be absorbed into my body.<br><br>
I would imagine that a more traditional midwife would prescribe alternative treatments for things rather than pills.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
wow. totally not the info I was asking for. I wanted reasons to choose a mw over an ob. I did not ask anything about the bcps. I'll post elsewhere.
 

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Stormbride: Having painful periods is not normal. If you have endometriosis (I do, too) anything containing estrogen (like most bcps) can make your problems much much worse. You need to seek a medical doctor, as much as I fear and hate doctors, I have to agree with the previous posters. If your doctor blows off your problems, you needs to find another one. Once you finds one who takes your problems seriously, you need to seek out a specialist, someone who is very highly skilled and knowledgable about whatever it is that they think is wrong. I would never go to a regular OB/GYN for my endo problems, and certainly not a midwife! I've done that, and made my problems so much worse in the process. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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that is a myth. It didn't go anywhere, unless you had it surgically removed. Older implants are often less active, and therefor less painful, but your body did not absorb it, it's still there.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mysticmomma1879</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">wow. totally not the info I was asking for. I wanted reasons to choose a mw over an ob. I did not ask anything about the bcps. I'll post elsewhere.</div>
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I think what people are trying to get at is that midwife and BCP aren't really synonymous. If you want to teach someone young about midwives, that's great. Taking them to see one for birth control isn't really the best way to do it though. If you want her to be interestedin midwives for later in life, get her some books (maybe some good o' Ina May to start with). I forget if you said how old she is. I"m guessing 14ish? She proibably doesn't have a lot of thought one way or another as to what OBs are vs Midwives anyway, so if you hook her up with an OB for medical things, she'll associate OB=medical early on. Reiterate that the Ob/GYN is there for medical PROBLEMS, you are going to see them because something is ABnormal. When things are well, you go to the midwife. If she wasn't having problems and you just wanted her to love the beauty of being female, menstruating, etc, you'd take her to a midwife. I don't think yu posted in the wrong place <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Also, there's nothing wrong with a little thread evolution <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br>
Namaste, Tara
 

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stafl: Neither of the women I'm talking about had endo. One of them eventually had a hysterectomy (she agreed with the doctor) because she was so tired of the pain, and they never did pin down exactly what was wrong (many, many doctors and OBs and who knows what else worked with her). She had four kids, all 10-month pregnancies, and her cycle was 49 days...with <i>extreme</i> pain during the periods. The pill did help the pain somewhat, so she was on it for several years. The other one was a girl I went to high school with and I have no idea what her ultimate prognosis was...but I do know that just before ds was born and for several months once I started menstruating again, I had incredibly painful periods...that just stopped hurting very muchafter several months. There's no sign of endo in my case, either.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Storm Bride</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">stafl: Neither of the women I'm talking about had endo. One of them eventually had a hysterectomy (she agreed with the doctor) because she was so tired of the pain, and they never did pin down exactly what was wrong (many, many doctors and OBs and who knows what else worked with her). She had four kids, all 10-month pregnancies, and her cycle was 49 days...with <i>extreme</i> pain during the periods. The pill did help the pain somewhat, so she was on it for several years. The other one was a girl I went to high school with and I have no idea what her ultimate prognosis was...but I do know that just before ds was born and for several months once I started menstruating again, I had incredibly painful periods...that just stopped hurting very muchafter several months. There's no sign of endo in my case, either.</div>
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no sign of endo? so you've had a lap? Because that is the ONLY way to dx endo. Endo implants can be microscopic and still cause tremendous amounts of pain. <a href="http://www.endometriosisassn.org" target="_blank">www.endometriosisassn.org</a>
 

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I haven't had a lap, because I don't get that kind of pain, anymore...it was only a few periods right around the time I got pregnant with ds, and then after he was weaned.<br><br>
The lady I'm talking about has had more than one lap...they spent over 20 years trying to diagnose her pain, and nobody ever figured out what was causing it. As I said, she did eventually have a hysterectomy (her initiative, I believe) and is now pain free. She seems happy with things, and doesn't spend 3-5 days every 7 weeks crippled.<br><br>
My SIL was diagnosed with endo a year or so ago, and she had surgery, as well...I believe it was also a hysterectomy. But, she had refused to deal with the pain (ie. pretended she was perfectly okay even though she was in agony) for a long time, and I don't know how bad the endo was by the time she went to see a doctor. I do know she seems a lot less...stressed (I obviously couldn't see her physical pain, but the chronic stress of coping with it shone through) than she used to. She didn't particularly have pain with her periods - she was in pain all the time. I think she felt that a hysterectomy was no big deal, as she'd already had a tubal. I can't really relate to that, but it was her uterus, so it's not my choice.
 

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I disagree that midwives are not appropriate for care such as rough periods.<br><br>
We see women for rough periods all the time. Wouldn't you rather have a mw spend one hour getting your history, examining your diet, your activity, stress, your family history, what you've tried, what works, what hasn't worked etc, than have an OB spend 15 minutes tops, not asking about lifestyle and behavioral aspects, just prescribing a med? CNMs who work under physicians have the same ability as a gyn to order tests and labwork. And similar training in interpreting them. They often work in conjunction with a doctor who specializes in women's health (ours do). And usually, we will order the same things as they will. If we feel we cannot help you or we have done what we thought would help and it hasn't, we will refer you to a gynecologist. Then the basics (which the GYN will do anyhow, usually for a higher fee) have already been covered, the results of any ultrasounds and labwork as well as office notes will be transferred, and the GYN can go more in depth immediately. And we have the scoop on the GYNs who will spend more time with you and about whom we have had good feedback from other clients. She will also be able to refer you to the appropriate specialist. Depending upon the test results, a GYN might not be the right person; perhaps a surgeon or an endocrinologist would be more appropriate.<br><br>
There are alot of reasons for rough periods, especially in younger women, that are relatively simple to diagnose and manage. Some are more complex, and require care from a specialist. A good CNM will be able to determine this.<br><br>
Even if the mw decides your care should be referred to a specialist, you probably aren't going to go to a specialist for all your well women care. If you have estabilshed care with a mw, then you can go to her for the issues that the specialist doesn't want or need to do.<br><br>
I hope this helps!<br><br>
Lori
 

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Lori, while i totally understand your perspective i have to respectfully disagree. the appointments that i spent with my Gyn. discussing my endo. pain (before we knew what it was!) ~ he spent almost 45 minutes discussing it all with me, listening to me, did a full exam... i brought in charts i had drawn showing where my pain was and he looked at those... he recommended dietary changes and even referred me to a local acupuncturist.<br><br>
so... not *all* doctors are pure evil. and not *all* midwives are great for all aspects of woman care all the time.
 

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While I agree that not all docs are evil (I *work* for a great doc) and not all midwives are fantastic, my point is that most CNMs are qualified to evaluate and treat many problems that women have, such as rough periods.<br><br>
Lori
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>klothos</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Lori, while i totally understand your perspective i have to respectfully disagree. the appointments that i spent with my Gyn. discussing my endo. pain (before we knew what it was!) ~ he spent almost 45 minutes discussing it all with me, listening to me, did a full exam... i brought in charts i had drawn showing where my pain was and he looked at those... he recommended dietary changes and even referred me to a local acupuncturist.<br><br>
so... not *all* doctors are pure evil. and not *all* midwives are great for all aspects of woman care all the time.</div>
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My endo specialist spent four hours answering all my questions the first time I saw him, and about two hours after the surgery telling me what he found, what it meant, and what he did about it. Even my OB spends as much time as it takes to answer all my questions. It's not impossible to find a caring doctor, you just have to put forth a little effort.<br><br>
Ultrasounds and labwork are useless when it comes to endometriosis. Endo usually doesn't show up on any tests, but a skilled doctor can tell where the worst of it is with a pelvic exam. A gyn is never the best option if endo is suspected. They are great at treating yeast infections and performing cesareans, but I wouldn't want to go to a dentist if I suspected a brain tumor any more than I'd go to a midwife or a gynecologist to do anything about painful periods.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>stafl</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">that is a myth. It didn't go anywhere, unless you had it surgically removed. Older implants are often less active, and therefor less painful, but your body did not absorb it, it's still there.</div>
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That's very interesting! Well whatever it was, both pregnancy and bcp did wonders for my pain for awhile.
 
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