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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2 mo old loves sleeping on his tummy. It all started when he was really colicky at 3 weeks and since I started sleeping him on his tummy he sleeps through the night. I mean really...11 until8 in the morning!!!<br>
Anyways, I just went to my pediatrician and I told him about the tummy thing and he said no problem as long as we don't have anything fluffy on top of our mattress....we do. We sleep on this fabulous cotton mattress and then have a two inch wool topper which makes our bed really cozy. The thing is ds is really good at turning his head from side to side and I really don't think he wouldn't be able to move if he couldn't breathe PLUS i am in the bed with him and I have heard sids is almost nonexistant co-sleeping situations because the momma and all her wonderful instincts are right there.<br><br>
What do you think? Take the wool topper off? or is there really not much of a risk here?
 

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My Ds (4 mo)has also been sleeping on his tummy since he was three weeks old due to colic. We have a foam mattress on top of our mattress which is also a no no, but he seems to be fine. For the first month or so, I was diligent about checking him every ten to fifteen minutes to make sure he could breath and guess what, it was never a problem. My Ds was also really good at moving his head and has been able to hold his head up since he was 4 weeks. IMO this is what makes the difference. Watch your baby and see if he can turn his head from side to side with no problem. We tried to take the foam mattress off the bed, but it was impossible to sleep on such a firm surface. You might consider trying a night or two without the wool topper to see if makes it impossible for you to sleep--Just to be on the safe side and if it gives you some piece of mind. One thing that eased my mind is that at night, my Ds slept mostly on his side because he constantly nursed. When he wanted on his tummy, he would often sleep on my chest. Now I don't worry at all, he is so strong, he can practically walk (ha ha), and can surely move his head to breath easier.
 

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Personally, I wouldn't keep him on his tummy, in that environment or any other. SIDS is not the same thing as suffocation. Sleeping on the tummy is a big risk factor, not because babies can't breathe, but because they sleep longer and deeper. The reason letting them sleep on their tummy seems to be a good thing (better, deeper, longer, uninterrupted sleep) is actually the very thing which invites SIDS.<br><br>
That's one reason that breastfeeding helps mitigate the risk of SIDS (although breastfeeding has a fairly small effect compared to tummy sleeping). Babies who breastfeed don't sleep as deeply.
 

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I think it's fine. In fact I've found that collicky babies *need* to sleep on their tummies. It seems to be the only way they can stay asleep for more than two minutes at a time. I don't think it's a risk at all for a baby who is already a light sleeper or if you are sleeping with them. I would try to make the surface flatter though if he's napping alone in the bed.
 

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You are right that SIDS is not the same as suffocation, but for this particular situation, the doctor was thinking of suffocation when he asked her to not have fluffy things on the bed. Heres some stuff from<br>
Dr. Sears website that might put this in perspective.<br><br>
HOW BACKSLEEPING HELPS<br>
Why back-sleeping lowers the risk of SIDS is not completely known, yet here are some possibilities.<br><br>
1. Back-sleeping babies awaken easier. Arousability from sleep in response to a life-threatening event is a healthy, protective mechanism and one that is thought to be diminished in infants at risk of SIDS. Back-sleepers arouse from sleep more easily and sleep less deeply than tummy-sleepers. Mothers have observed, and research has confirmed, that infants sleep more deeply on their tummies. Yet, sleeping more deeply does not mean sleeping more safely.<br><br>
2. Back-sleeping babies have a lower chance of getting overheated. Overheating, possibly by interfering with the central nervous system control of breathing, is another risk factor for SIDS. Lying on your back leaves your face and internal organs exposed so that they can radiate heat more readily than when sleeping on your tummy. (That's why when your cold, you probably curl up on your front or side to conserve heat.) Also, front- sleeping babies are more likely to slip down under the covers than those sleeping on their backs, another factor that may contribute to overheating, since a baby's prime avenue for heat loss is through their head and face. In the back position, even the baby who slips down underneath the covers would be more likely to throw them off. The contact of a cover with the face is more likely to be noticed and protested by a back-sleeping baby than the contact of the cover with the back of the head would be in a front-sleeping baby.<br><br>
3. Back-sleeping babies breathe more oxygen. When sleeping face down, a baby may press her head into the mattress or wiggle her face against a soft object. This can form a pocket of air around her face, leaving her to rebreathe her own exhaled air, which has diminished oxygen.<br><br>
4. Back-sleeping babies are less likely to suffocate. Conventional wisdom has always taught that suffocation is a rare cause of SIDS. Yes, babies are sturdy little persons who, even as newborns, are able to lift their heads and keep their noses clear to breath. The often quoted "study" that even tiny infants have the ability to lift their heads and wiggle their noses clear of obstruction was not really a scientific study; it was more of an observation. Yet, new insights cast doubt on the rareness of suffocation. A growing belief among SIDS researchers is that many babies presumably diagnosed as SIDS may have in reality died from suffocation on soft surfaces<br><br>
While no one knows exactly why the front-sleeping position is linked to SIDS, the overwhelming number of studies that all come to the same conclusion – back sleeping decreases the risk of SIDS – make it clear that for healthy infants, back-sleeping is safer. Parents should note that there are some medical conditions, such as gastroesophageal reflux or structural abnormalities of the jawbones and airway, in which it is safer for babies to sleep on their tummies rather than on their backs. Be sure to check with your doctor to see whether or not your baby has a medical reason to sleep on his tummy rather than his back.<br><br>
BABIES WHO SHOULD SLEEP TUMMY DOWN<br>
Be sure to check with your doctor to see if your baby has any medical conditions that necessitate front sleeping. Babies who should sleep prone are the following: • Premature babies with respiratory problems still in the hospital; sleeping on the tummy increases breathing efficiency in prematures with compromised breathing, but not necessarily when their lungs are normal• Babies with small jawbones or other structural abnormalities that may compromise the airway when sleeping on their fronts• Babies who have mucous-producing respiratory infections or profuse drooling associated with teething – if so advised by your doctor• <b>Babies who are extremely restless and settle poorly unless sleeping prone</b>• Babies who suffer from gastroesophageal reflux (GER).<br><br>
Hope this helps. For me the decision was made for me. My Ds would not sleep if he was on his back unless I was with him. So for naps...on his tummy he went. But like I said earlier, at night, he slept on his side or on my chest. There is more about SIDS on Dr. Sears website if your interested.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>KristiMetz</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Personally, I wouldn't keep him on his tummy, in that environment or any other. SIDS is not the same thing as suffocation. Sleeping on the tummy is a big risk factor, not because babies can't breathe, but because they sleep longer and deeper. The reason letting them sleep on their tummy seems to be a good thing (better, deeper, longer, uninterrupted sleep) is actually the very thing which invites SIDS.<br><br>
That's one reason that breastfeeding helps mitigate the risk of SIDS (although breastfeeding has a fairly small effect compared to tummy sleeping). Babies who breastfeed don't sleep as deeply.</div>
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</tr></table></div>
<br><a href="http://www.inspiredparenting.net/learn/library/vol3_no2/sids_html" target="_blank">http://www.inspiredparenting.net/lea..._no2/sids_html</a><br>
I don't think sleeping on your tummy invites SIDS. just my opinion. I think tummy sleeping is soothing for a colicky baby. ds was extremely colicky til about a month or two ago, and learned how to roll from back to tummy early on because he hates lying on his back so much.<br>
I tend to be of the same thought as the article I posted link to.Sleeping deeply is a good thing, but all babies are wired to arouse easily when nessecary, unless under the influence of some drug.Babies do not sleep deeply as we do.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br>
That said, we do not have a matress cover, we lie on a firm, mattress, and i am not afraid of SIDS. ds sleeps alot in my lap as we fall asleep in our cozy chair most times. And i sling him most of the day. He is not on a matress very often yet<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br>
I know what the research says, but ds will only sleep on his tummy or side.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/innocent.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shy">
 

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I put both my gassy sons to sleep on their tummy with encouragment from my mom. Both are fine ds#1 is 3 and ds#2 is 10 months. That being said they also both woke up to nurse every few hours and ds#2 still does. Also I would remove the mattress topper until baby gets a little older.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
you know the last fw nights I have tried the back sleeping and it just isn't for us. Plus, coincidentally (and I do not believe in coincidences) my mom just went to a teacher's workshop with some dr. lecturer and he was talking about a study that has just come out that is connecting some of the recent difficulties school age children are having with lack of tummy time as children. Sorry I don't know the specifics but I was hearing it 2nd hand. Something about how all children used to sleep on their tummies so they were a lot stronger because they had to learn how to push themselves up and this somehow affects their relationship between their left and right brain in a positive way. They are finding now adays that the new generation has slept on their backs and their are increasing learning disabilities associated with the left and right brain working together.<br><br>
This is a very crude analogy...wish I knew more...but I took it as a sign.
 
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