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Hi everyone,<br><br>
I have a question about babywearing on a plane. When DH and I were traveling with our little one last month, I had DD in a sling where she was happily snoozing. We were getting ready for take-off, and the flight attendant made me take Natalie out of her sling. I thought that was odd, since having her in the sling would make her safer from the turbulence and bouncing around, yes? I resisted a bit, but in this day and age, didn't want to make a scene and get booted from the plane.<br><br>
Has anyone experienced this, or does anyone know why this would be a guideline? We had just taken another flight before then (these were EARLY in the morning) and nobody said anything to me there.<br><br>
Thanks for any input you have! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I guess it would depend on the airline because I flew last month, used a sling going and a mei tai coming back, and was not told a thing. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
laural
 

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I've frequently been told to take my kids out of slings, ergos, or the baby b'air during takeoff and landing. Something about them being FAA-unapproved as a restraining device. I think it does depend on your airline. Which one were you on?
 

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As a former flight attendant, I can tell you that the FAA has rules (known as FARS) that apply to all US airlines. Some flight attendants just don't do a great job of enforcing the rules. Personally, I wouldn't want to be on a flight where the flight attendant didn't enforce the FAA mandated rules, because who knows what else she (or he) isn't doing (as far as preflight safety checks, security sweeps, etc.). The FARS require all lap babies to be unrestrained. If a sudden impact were to occur, strong g-forces could actually cause injury to a baby restrained in a sling (or other such device).
 

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Aha. There you have it. It was such a hassle to deal with the slings, and I found landing to be somewhat worrisome, so we've since bought seats (and brought carseats) for the kids since those trips.
 

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I use the child belt with mine if she's still in the sling. We've never brought a craseat on the airplane and we travel a million miles a year! (US-SE Asia - Europe)
 

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I had a frustrating instance just two days ago. DS was sleeping, facing my chest, legs wrapped around, OUT of his carrier. He had had a REALLY rough trip and i was so happy he was going to sleep for this long plane ride.<br><br>
They made me turn him facing forward. That of course woke him and he was up then, but cranky. GRRR!<br><br>
I don't understand, it seems safer if he was wrapped around me and i could brace him, rather than forward to smack him head on the front chair should somthing happen.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mkmama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7919169"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I don't understand, it seems safer if he was wrapped around me and i could brace him, rather than forward to smack him head on the front chair should somthing happen.</div>
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I've flown a lot with my baby, too. And the way it was explained to me is that the FAA has done extensive testing on the best positions for babies to be sitting in . The facing forward thing actually makes sense to me. I saw FAA crash test footage somewhere (On Mythbusters, I think), and in a sudden stop, your body will fold completely forward at the waist. If your baby is facing forward with you, his body would bend with yours. If he was facing your body, the force of your body bending forward would snap his back as it forced his spine to bend backwards. That would be a bad thing.<br><br>
Being in a sling in a sudden stop or a crash could actually be worse for the baby than being flung out of your lap. Think about a baby in an Ergo... his body from mid-back down is restrained, so his shoulders and head take 100% of the forces of the crash. Having the forces dispersed so unevenly across that little body could cause serious injury.<br><br>
Seems to me that bumps, bruises or even breaks from falling out of your arms would be better than having a neck-snapping whiplash, concussive forces to the brain, etc.<br><br>
Airlines are especially sensitive about safety precautions on take off and landings because the plane is moving so, so fast on the ground at those points. If something occurs on the runway and the pilot has to brake suddenly or turn suddenly, there's going to be a heck of a stop, generating incredible g-forces. It's incredibly rare that a plane would fall out of the sky, and frankly, when that happens, no amount of seatbelts or car seats are going to help you. Though you don't hear about them much, sudden stops on runways are much more common, though, and that's when the safety guidelines become really valuable.
 

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HEY KEEKS!!!<br><br>
it's lou from dottis.<br><br>
I flew with my godson last summer and they made us take him out for take off and landing, but during the flight it was OK.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hey Lou!!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br><br>
OK thanks everyone. I didn't know it was an FAA guideline. I guess that makes sense. It just *felt* so secure, I didn't understand. Thanks for the explanations.<br><br>
And, to answer the question about what airline it was -- it was United.<br><br>
I didn't know if it was a fluke thing or an actual hard and fast rule. Now I know. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I flew several times and I didn't take my daughter out of the sling. On two occasions the flight attendant told me to hold the baby in the bracing position, but I didn't do it. I opted instead to nurse her. They can't say stop feeding the baby for take off....besides nursing during take off helps the baby deal with the elevation.
 

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yes, I had to take my DD out of her sling too. the flight attendant said there is a FAA approved sling/carrier out there but I can't remember the name of it. It was one I hadn't heard of before.
 

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I've been both allowed to leave dd in her sling & been asked to remove. Once I was complemented one way on using the sling & asked to not use the sling on the return trip - this was the same airline both ways. So I really think it depends on the attendent.<br><br>
Though hearing the explanation from a pp on why a sling is not recommended is helpful. TY!
 

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I have had both happen. I haven't been able to find a good answer. The body bending forward facing thing sounds good but they never made me sit her up and forward face her during take off/landing. She was always laying down nursing so the position argument doesn't make sense to me in reality.
 
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