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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After talking with my dd's SN teacher this week briefly, she made it clear that she thinks my DD is very smart...despite all her "issues". That's great but it's making it hard for me to make decisions about her schooling.<br><br>
Her issues seem to be Auditory Processing Disorder, SID and maybe ADHD. She's 3y10m and on the cusp of beginning to read (she's showing lots of interest in learning how to read anyway). I think with some extra work she could also do some beginning math but I just haven't focused on that with her...most of her interest has been self-learned/motivated and I just try to provide things she's interested in.....<br><br>
Anyway, her language is very atypical and she rarely responds to peers in a conversational way....it's hard to tell if it's shyness or the APD. She's very "well behaved" so it's also hard to tell if she's paying attention (while staring off in space) or if she's not getting what's going on around her.<br><br>
I don't know whether or not to hold her back from K - my instinct says that language-wise and socially I should - but her teacher says she's so smart that she needs the academic stimulation....<br><br>
Anyone else have a "smart" SN kid? How have you negotiated what seems like huge deficits in one area with huge strengths/advances in others?<br><br>
Just looking for some mentoring here....<br>
peace,<br>
robyn
 

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We know my daughter is definitely very smart. We see it an her SLP comments all the time about how smart she is. She just picks up a lot of things very quickly. She definitely has areas of weakness though too. I just take her as she is and work with her in each area at whatever level she is at. It helps too that we plan to homeschool so we can do that.<br><br>
I have been recommending this book: <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FMind-at-Time-Mel-Levine%2Fdp%2F0743202236%2Fref%3Dpd_bbs_sr_2%2F102-0960178-6416102%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dbooks%26qid%3D1188402148%26sr%3D1-2" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/Mind-at-Time-M...8402148&sr=1-2</a> all over the place lately and I think it would be helpful to you too. The whole premise of the book is that every child's mind is different and we have to look at their strengths and weaknesses and find ways to work with both. I think it's a fabulous book.
 

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She's very young to diagnose auditory processing problems. I'm assuming her hearing has been checked. What kind of help is she getting for the auditory processing part of it? I agree that it is difficult to tell about peer conversation when they are so young. I would be sure you are doing stuff that helps with auditory processing: nursery rhymes, music, swimming, left right activities, etc.<br><br>
You may want to swing over to the gifted board and see what responses you get there. If you haven't already read them I'd suggest these books:<br><br><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FMisdiagnosis-Diagnoses-Gifted-Children-Adults%2Fdp%2F0910707642" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/Misdiagnosis-D.../dp/0910707642</a><br><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FLosing-Our-Minds-Gifted-Children%2Fdp%2F0910707707%2Fref%3Dsr_1_1%2F105-3308962-4294808%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dbooks%26qid%3D1188402585%26sr%3D1-1" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/Losing-Our-Min...8402585&sr=1-1</a>
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the book recos - I will check them out at our library!<br><br>
Roar - yes we had her hearing checked and even though she had trouble understanding what the audiologist's instructions were, she tested in the normal range as far as they could tell (they used some animal noise test...)<br><br>
They said they couldn't "definitively" diagnose APD until 7 or something but that they are going on the assumption that is what she has since she doesn't really meet the PDD-NOS criteria. She goes to a language intensive SN preschool where she gets pulled out for ST and OT...she is very interested in written language and symbols and they often motivate her to learn words by using what is written.<br><br>
I was interested in the rest of your list...she excels at swimming, she LOVES music, she's getting more into rhymes etc - but we don't necessarily do anything formal with that....what is left right activities?<br><br>
peace,<br>
robyn
 

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One thing I'm just going give you the heads up about. They may think she has hyperlexia when she starts reading early. We got that from therapists and it wasn't accurate and I've heard of that happening with other special needs gifted kids. If it helps at all I will say that our son's speech improved a great deal when he started reading. While that isn't the way it communication progresses for most kids there is a subset that it does seem to work that way.<br><br>
By left-right activities I mean anything that requires use of both sides of the body - swimming, playing the banjo, catch, the hokey pokey, etc. You'll sometimes hear this referred to as bilateral coordination. There is some thought that anything that provides vestibular stimulation (including swimming and swinging) is good for the inner ear and may help with auditory processing.<br><br>
If you have access to Music Together or Kindermusik or another program like that it may be worth a try. MT in particular is good for ear training and it seemed like it helped our son with his auditory processing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thanks, that's helpful...we do have MT around here so I will look into it....I would LOVE for DD to start an instrument soon - I think for her birthday in October I will get her a kiddie guitar because everytime she sees one she is fascinated! I have a banjo (!) at home that I let her play with sometimes but it's too big for her to do anything with...maybe she can play with a kiddie guitar and have some fun! (I've also thought about tap dancing because we have a pair of tap shoes someone gave us and she LOVES to wear them and hear what it sounds like...but there aren't any kiddie tap programs around here unfortunately!)<br><br>
but it's good to think about the LR stuff - most of which are actually her strengths! I would love to build on her strengths as much as I can....<br><br>
peace,<br>
robyn
 

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I have a kid that is way above age level on some academics, but socially and speech wise very, very behind. I am not sure what to do yet, but we will be discussing placement in the upcoming IEP meeting.<br><br>
For now, he is mainstreamed in a typical kindergarten classroom with me acting as his aide. I am undecided if I want him to continue there or whether it might be a better match for him to be in a communications disorder classroom. He needs exposure to typical peers, but the CD classroom would let him work where ever he is at academically while addressing his speech issues. I don't want to see him in a full autism room at this point because it seems to be directed at kids who have both social and severe cognative impairments, and that is not where he is at. (I don't think that is the same scenerio in every district, just the school I am dealing with)<br><br>
If he remains in the mainstream classroom with an aide, I would like to see him pulled out for a few academic subjects to he can do advanced work. It is good for him socially though to be with his peers, and even though it isn't challenging academically, he is still struggling to produce because of the social requirements. The fact the work is so easy for him does help in the sense of him being able to participate a little better, so it is really a double edged sword.<br><br>
I don't really have any advice, but I totally understand the dilema. I hesitate to say he is actually "gifted" at this point, but I am pretty sure he isn't impared cognitivly. And, with ASDs, that can all change if he starts having seizures, so I keep my eye out on all the options because who knows what the future holds.
 

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My DD (turning 5 late next month) could have gone to kindergarten with an IEP this year but we chose not to send her. She is bright and curious. Academically she is ready for kindergarten. All of her teachers and therapists say that she is very smart. She has a few areas where she especially excels.<br><br>
She spent the past 3 years in special needs preschool and is doing quite well developmentally EXCEPT for sensory issues (which would not be well supported in most K placements), immaturity (emotionally and socially) and a relatively poor attention span. She also fatigues very easily. Those problems were enough to make me decide not to send her. She is home with me this year and we are undecided on whether she will attend our PS kindergarten next (7.5 hour days and intense curriculum), a private school K, a different school district with half day K or be homeschooled. My head just spins thinking about it.<br><br>
It's a tough, tough decision. I've been stewing about school placement for the past three years and it's making me <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">:.<br><br>
Good luck!!
 

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I don't think that a child would need "academic stimulation," whether they were smart or not. It's not like the smartness is going away and you have to catch it now. I would relax on that part of things...my dd is 6.5 and not reading and doing just wonderful academically. She's started writing just recently as we started some first grade work in our homeschool. I would just relax and let her go at her own pace...I think it is extremely important to pay attention to where she is developmentally and emotionally right now. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>fluttermama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9043934"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I don't think that a child would need "academic stimulation," whether they were smart or not. It's not like the smartness is going away and you have to catch it now. I would relax on that part of things...my dd is 6.5 and not reading and doing just wonderful academically. She's started writing just recently as we started some first grade work in our homeschool. I would just relax and let her go at her own pace...I think it is extremely important to pay attention to where she is developmentally and emotionally right now. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"></div>
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Yeah, see that's how I feel - but the teacher got me thinking I was wrong...<br><br>
I guess I just feel like I'd rather that my DD had some idea of what it meant to go to K - I remember being very excited! But to her, she can't even understand the concept right now because of where her language is...<br><br>
Well I have at least until January when school registration starts. I'll just keep gathering information until then and until the IEP in February. hopefully by then I will have more of an idea of a good game plan and convince everyone else of it too! LOL<br><br>
peace,<br>
robyn
 
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