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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello! We are considering starting to homeschool our kids (going into 2nd and 3rd grade) and are interested in some version of "worldschooling"/ traveling while homeschooling. This would be possible because my husband's work is seasonal and I do part-time contract work from home.

I've been wanting to homeschool anyway but we came to this idea after looking at buying a larger home and realizing we would be spending so much money on this new house that wouldn't we rather use that money to travel, show the kids more of the world, and even just get away from our crazy cold winters.

In the scenario we are envisioning, we would stay in our current home and homeschool here most of the year, keep the kids in their regular fall/spring extracurriculars, and then spend January/ February/ most of March traveling- ideally staying in one place per winter but maybe some winters it would be a shorter trip depending on the cost of the location etc.

Besides the expense, possible downsides I see include the kids not wanting to leave their friends in the winter (or their friends growing apart from them bc they're not around for months at a time). What else am I not thinking of?

Has anyone done/ is anyone doing something like this? I realize the situation is unique bc of our jobs but I'm hoping there are others out there in similar scenario. Thanks!
 

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What else am I not thinking of?
We used to dream about doing this. Then, by the time it was possible for us financially (i.e. when my eldest was about 12) it was no longer something that worked for the kids. They had ended up finding passions which have kept them pretty rooted to place. Stuff like:

Piano and piano lessons ... fairly high level studies with a teacher with whom my eldest had a very special relationship; an electric keyboard and Skype lessons would definitely not have been sufficient.

Community orchestra, chamber music groups, etc. No one wants to form an ensemble with a student who is going to be gone for three or four of the core months every year.

Ballet, with ongoing attentive teaching from a skilled teacher amongst a group of very committed students, in a studio where a year-long commitment is required and there's a waiting list of kids looking for spots if you can't commit.

An amazing auditioned youth choir with annual festivals, retreats, multi-day tours.

Part-time jobs that flowed out of regular volunteer work in the community.

Election to the board of directors of an active local non-profit society.

When my kids were all under 10, I didn't anticipate the way they'd end up involved in so many things that required their ongoing participation. But it happened to all of them by the time they were 13 or so. It wasn't about friends as much as it was about the ability to pursue their interests and talents to the level that they wanted.

It's possible your kids won't end up deeply committed to community-based interests the way mine have been. But perhaps it's a possibility to keep in mind anyway if they're still young. Maybe if you start snowbirding while they're young they won't develop that connection to community and won't miss it. You won't put them in ballet in the first place, because you know you'll be leaving before the end of term....

Miranda
 

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I think it sounds like a great opportunity.


We are not doing this, but a family we are friends with does something similar. Every year, they spend three months in Spain, May - July. They did this when the kids were all in Montessori (missing class was not a problem at the school) and now that we have been HS'ing the past few years. (They left the Montessori school and started HS'ing shortly after we did.)


It is a great experience for their daughter. She gets to travel throughout Europe and is learning a lot through travel. The kids miss each other but they still hook up on Minecraft and chat on Whatsapp.
 

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Saw moominmamma's reply after I posted. She brings up a really good point.


The family we know has done this for years so their daughter (currently 11) is not in activities during the three months she is gone. They plan around their trip. In our area, a lot of activities stop during summer months so she is not missing too much. However, she does take a break from some things - like piano and voice lessons.
 

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I live in Alaska, where seasonal travel is common, including lots of seasonal workers, snowbirds, families that go off fishing in summer, etc... Our part-time or most-of-the-time residents seem to have no trouble fitting into the community, either as kids or adults. However, this means that there are relatively few year-round activities, and that people disappearing for large chunks of time is accepted.

I have a somewhat similar situation to you since we're a family of wilderness adventurers, and regularly go off on 2 to 4 month expeditions. However, my kids are little (6.5 and 4.5), so I can't give you much in the way of helpful insights.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks everyone, your responses have been very helpful! I hadn't thought about classes that are year-round that they wouldn't necessarily be able to take part in. We have a lot of thinking to do for sure. Thanks again!
 
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