Mothering Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,236 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ds is 25 months old. I thought his sleep would improve as he got older. Apparently not.<br><br>
The past few months have been, for lack of a better word, hell. Seriously, I've forgotten what it is like to wake up refreshed. I'm operating in a fog of sleep deprivation & exhaustion every day. It's no longer sustainable. Dh nearly got into 2 bad accidents yesterday because he was also sleep deprived. Something has to give.<br><br>
The new 'rythm' for the past few days, ds has been fighting sleep until literally midnight-2am. Unless he doesn't get his afternoon nap, then he conks out at 11pm. And, predictably, he's up at 5. It starts with nursing a bit. After 45min of nursing, I pull him off & he's awake. Then the rolling around, sighing, and arm rubbing start. I literally feel like I have no skin on my upper arms where he keeps rubbing--either with his hands or his body. They still tingle & hurt. I give up around 6 or 7 am and take him out. He's happy, plays, but I'm honestly incredibly grumpy.<br><br>
Of course, then at around 9am-10am or so, he collapses on the floor, sleeping. I can't take him back to bed before then because the crying & rolling & screaming fits start. He'll sleep until noon. And then he promptly refuses an afternoon nap.<br><br>
Or, if gets an afternoon nap in, he goes to bed later & still wakes up super early. Even days when he 'sleeps' longer I still wake up groggy--maybe he's waking me up several times to nurse & I don't remember?<br><br>
At this point, I feel like I'm either going to start giving him baby sleeping stuff or lock him in the bathroom after he wakes up in the morning.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> We only have one bedroom, so co-sleeping is the way it has to be. But I don't know how much longer I can take this. I am so tired. Dh is so tired. And these past few days, I've lost it with him in the mornings. I'm literally screaming at him. I swear this is torture of the worst kind--I can't think straight, I'm moody, all I want is some damn sleep! Seriously, CIO is incredibly inviting right now, the only thing keeping from it is that there's no other room for him. And yes, I am THAT tired to even entertain that.<br><br><br>
HELP!<br><br>
Ami
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
So sorry you're having such a hard time! Sounds like he might be seriously overtired and it's causing him to be too wound up to sleep properly. He should be sleeping around a total of 13 hours a day, 11-12 at night with one nap. Doesn't mean he should be able to sleep 11-12 hours straight at night, but that should be closer to what he's getting, not 6 hours!!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/jaw2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="jaw2"><br><br>
Is there a possibility he may have allergies? Some kids who just can't sleep have food sensitivities. My daughter wake up in the middle of the night and thinks she should go play if she has any corn syrup or too much dairy, but <b>never</b> does this if we keep those things out of her diet.<br><br>
You might want to check out <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FNo-Cry-Sleep-Solution-Toddlers-Preschoolers%2Fdp%2F0071444912%2Fref%3Dsr_1_1%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dbooks%26qid%3D1253374718%26sr%3D8-1" target="_blank">The No Cry Sleep Solution for Toddlers and Preschoolers</a>. It might have some suggestions that might help you. If you think it could be allergies, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FThis-Your-Child-Doris-Rapp%2Fdp%2F0688119077%2Fref%3Dsr_1_1%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dbooks%26qid%3D1253374751%26sr%3D8-1" target="_blank">Is This Your Child</a> by Dr. Doris Wrap might be helpful to read. You might be able to check them out from your local library.<br><br>
Good luck! I hope everyone gets some sleep! Until then, you and your DH may want to take shifts. Who ever is going to be getting up at 5am should go to bed before DS while the other one watches him till he's ready to go to sleep. That way you'll at least get some rest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,426 Posts
Your post really scares me, OP. The zeal that we have to change America's CIO culture is a good thing, IMO, but over and over I've seen the issue of unsustainable exhaustion minimized. Car accidents, depression, increased susceptibility to illness, frayed tempers - we do our children no favors when we let ourselves get this sick.<br><br>
I don't know what you have or have not tried in the area of diet, natural sleep aids like melatonin, etc., and there are probably some things there that could help. But the essential problem is logistical. You are bedsharing with a child who is simply not cut out to bed-share at this age.<br><br>
Since you can't get a two-bedroom place, I'd get a crib or toddler bed to put in your room. Then you'll have to explain to him why he's going to sleep in it (that's the good thing about his age, you can actually tell him what's up with the exhaustion issue). Then you will have to put him down in his crib or bed, and when he gets out, you'll have to put him back. You will have to do this approximately five million times, without crying or yelling or showing anger. You will have to do this at naptime, at bedtime, and throughout the night.<br><br>
It will probably take you weeks to help him replace the existing unhealthy sleep habits with healthy ones. But it really, truly can be done. You are the adult. You are the one who can take the long-range view and summon the emotional strength to put him back in his bed a zillion times, to answer his crying with calm assurance, and to stick to your resolution that you are going to heal your family's sleep.<br><br>
If he can't yet climb out of a crib, I'd buy one that converts to a toddler bed. Then you don't have to add in the physical strain of returning him to his bed with the emotional strain of chanting "it's all right, I'm here, it's time for sleep now" hour after hour. IMNSHO, is not CIO to let a toddler cry in their bed when you are present in the room gently explaining that it is time for sleep, that sleep is necessary for them to be healthy, etc. It's not the best thing ever, but it's a lot less traumatic than losing your dad in a pileup on the freeway <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
Best of luck to you, mama!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
349 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Smithie</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14407408"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Your post really scares me, OP. The zeal that we have to change America's CIO culture is a good thing, IMO, but over and over I've seen the issue of unsustainable exhaustion minimized. Car accidents, depression, increased susceptibility to illness, frayed tempers - we do our children no favors when we let ourselves get this sick.<br><br>
I don't know what you have or have not tried in the area of diet, natural sleep aids like melatonin, etc., and there are probably some things there that could help. But the essential problem is logistical. You are bedsharing with a child who is simply not cut out to bed-share at this age.<br><br>
Since you can't get a two-bedroom place, I'd get a crib or toddler bed to put in your room. Then you'll have to explain to him why he's going to sleep in it (that's the good thing about his age, you can actually tell him what's up with the exhaustion issue). Then you will have to put him down in his crib or bed, and when he gets out, you'll have to put him back. You will have to do this approximately five million times, without crying or yelling or showing anger. You will have to do this at naptime, at bedtime, and throughout the night.<br><br>
It will probably take you weeks to help him replace the existing unhealthy sleep habits with healthy ones. But it really, truly can be done. You are the adult. You are the one who can take the long-range view and summon the emotional strength to put him back in his bed a zillion times, to answer his crying with calm assurance, and to stick to your resolution that you are going to heal your family's sleep.<br><br>
If he can't yet climb out of a crib, I'd buy one that converts to a toddler bed. Then you don't have to add in the physical strain of returning him to his bed with the emotional strain of chanting "it's all right, I'm here, it's time for sleep now" hour after hour. IMNSHO, is not CIO to let a toddler cry in their bed when you are present in the room gently explaining that it is time for sleep, that sleep is necessary for them to be healthy, etc. It's not the best thing ever, but it's a lot less traumatic than losing your dad in a pileup on the freeway <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
Best of luck to you, mama!</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Yes, yes and more YES. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,891 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Smithie</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14407408"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Your post really scares me, OP. The zeal that we have to change America's CIO culture is a good thing, IMO, but over and over I've seen the issue of unsustainable exhaustion minimized. Car accidents, depression, increased susceptibility to illness, frayed tempers - we do our children no favors when we let ourselves get this sick.<br><br>
I don't know what you have or have not tried in the area of diet, natural sleep aids like melatonin, etc., and there are probably some things there that could help. But the essential problem is logistical. You are bedsharing with a child who is simply not cut out to bed-share at this age.<br><br>
Since you can't get a two-bedroom place, I'd get a crib or toddler bed to put in your room. Then you'll have to explain to him why he's going to sleep in it (that's the good thing about his age, you can actually tell him what's up with the exhaustion issue). Then you will have to put him down in his crib or bed, and when he gets out, you'll have to put him back. You will have to do this approximately five million times, without crying or yelling or showing anger. You will have to do this at naptime, at bedtime, and throughout the night.<br><br>
It will probably take you weeks to help him replace the existing unhealthy sleep habits with healthy ones. But it really, truly can be done. You are the adult. You are the one who can take the long-range view and summon the emotional strength to put him back in his bed a zillion times, to answer his crying with calm assurance, and to stick to your resolution that you are going to heal your family's sleep.<br><br>
If he can't yet climb out of a crib, I'd buy one that converts to a toddler bed. Then you don't have to add in the physical strain of returning him to his bed with the emotional strain of chanting "it's all right, I'm here, it's time for sleep now" hour after hour. IMNSHO, is not CIO to let a toddler cry in their bed when you are present in the room gently explaining that it is time for sleep, that sleep is necessary for them to be healthy, etc. It's not the best thing ever, but it's a lot less traumatic than losing your dad in a pileup on the freeway <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
Best of luck to you, mama!</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
This post was of huge help to me. Thank you. My 2 year old is driving me nuts with her poor sleep habits. So tomorrow I will start a routine. Tomorrow is a new day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
We are in a very similar situation with our 18-mo-old. I imagine it only gets worse when the child *knows* more and understands more and knows what s/he wants.<br><br>
We moved DS to a mattress on the floor at 12 months. We did it in his room, and DH slept with him. We tried weaning him from sleeping with an adult and that did not work.<br><br>
If you have time on your hands (I hope you're resting), which your probably don't, you can read my previous posts. I've also become extremely angry and gone to very scary lows all due to this early-morning waking and screaming before bedtime.<br><br>
I can't believe I fought the CIO theory and advocates for so long, just to be in this horrible situation where I fantasize about it.<br><br>
But, honestly, I don't think it would work. DS cries with us present soooo much lately. There's no way our situation--or his state of being--would be improved if we left him by himself.<br><br>
Do what you can to get by. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><br><br>
P.S. It's hell on earth, especially when rundown and beaten up by exhaustion, but consoling him while putting him down on a twin mattress sounds like a good idea.<br><br>
P.P.S. I also second that your DS must be soooo tired that his little body can't switch to sleep. Sleepless in America is a book I'd recommend when you get some rest. Maybe we MDC mamas can sum it up for you. IMO it's way too anecdotal and cute to read when you're in a really rough spot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,236 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Carrruth</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14406198"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">So sorry you're having such a hard time! Sounds like he might be seriously overtired and it's causing him to be too wound up to sleep properly. He should be sleeping around a total of 13 hours a day, 11-12 at night with one nap. Doesn't mean he should be able to sleep 11-12 hours straight at night, but that should be closer to what he's getting, not 6 hours!!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/jaw2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="jaw2"><br><br>
Is there a possibility he may have allergies? Some kids who just can't sleep have food sensitivities. My daughter wake up in the middle of the night and thinks she should go play if she has any corn syrup or too much dairy, but <b>never</b> does this if we keep those things out of her diet.<br><br>
Good luck! I hope everyone gets some sleep! Until then, you and your DH may want to take shifts. Who ever is going to be getting up at 5am should go to bed before DS while the other one watches him till he's ready to go to sleep. That way you'll at least get some rest.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Thanks for the book suggestions! I will keep an eye out for them at the library. He is sensitive to corn, but I'm pretty on top of keeping it away from him. As for the shift thing, I don't know. Dh works either the swing shift (3pm to 11pm) or the morning shift (7am to 3pm) so it's hard to really get down a rithym for it that doesn't leave both of us tired.<br><br>
I think he is overtired, now that you mention it. It seems he sleeps worse when he doesn't get a nap in.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Smithie</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14407408"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Your post really scares me, OP. The zeal that we have to change America's CIO culture is a good thing, IMO, but over and over I've seen the issue of unsustainable exhaustion minimized. Car accidents, depression, increased susceptibility to illness, frayed tempers - we do our children no favors when we let ourselves get this sick.<br><br>
I don't know what you have or have not tried in the area of diet, natural sleep aids like melatonin, etc., and there are probably some things there that could help. But the essential problem is logistical. You are bedsharing with a child who is simply not cut out to bed-share at this age.<br><br>
Since you can't get a two-bedroom place, I'd get a crib or toddler bed to put in your room. Then you'll have to explain to him why he's going to sleep in it (that's the good thing about his age, you can actually tell him what's up with the exhaustion issue). Then you will have to put him down in his crib or bed, and when he gets out, you'll have to put him back. You will have to do this approximately five million times, without crying or yelling or showing anger. You will have to do this at naptime, at bedtime, and throughout the night.<br><br><span style="color:#0000FF;">We are not technically sleeping in the same bed. I have his crib sidcarred and he spends all night in it. So he does have his own space. I could put on the other side, but I'd only be able to pull our bed a couple inches away--our room is that small. He'd still be able to reach through the bars & touch me. I don't know if it's worth it if he can still do that. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/headscratch.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="headscratch"></span><br><br>
It will probably take you weeks to help him replace the existing unhealthy sleep habits with healthy ones. But it really, truly can be done. You are the adult. You are the one who can take the long-range view and summon the emotional strength to put him back in his bed a zillion times, to answer his crying with calm assurance, and to stick to your resolution that you are going to heal your family's sleep.<br><br>
If he can't yet climb out of a crib, I'd buy one that converts to a toddler bed. Then you don't have to add in the physical strain of returning him to his bed with the emotional strain of chanting "it's all right, I'm here, it's time for sleep now" hour after hour. IMNSHO, is not CIO to let a toddler cry in their bed when you are present in the room gently explaining that it is time for sleep, that sleep is necessary for them to be healthy, etc. It's not the best thing ever, but it's a lot less traumatic than losing your dad in a pileup on the freeway <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
Best of luck to you, mama!</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Thanks for the tips. I feel so bad when he cries though. He's also a 'high needs baby/toddler' meaning he literally won't stop crying. I've tried similar techniques and he keeps crying. Then dh gets mad because his son is crying and no one is sleeping.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> Ever since Carrruth mentioned it, I've realized that ds sleeps worse when he doesn't get in naps. Now the fight is how to get him to nap consistently?<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>editornj</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14407837"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">We are in a very similar situation with our 18-mo-old. I imagine it only gets worse when the child *knows* more and understands more and knows what s/he wants.<br><br>
We moved DS to a mattress on the floor at 12 months. We did it in his room, and DH slept with him. We tried weaning him from sleeping with an adult and that did not work.<br><br>
If you have time on your hands (I hope you're resting), which your probably don't, you can read my previous posts. I've also become extremely angry and gone to very scary lows all due to this early-morning waking and screaming before bedtime.<br><br>
I can't believe I fought the CIO theory and advocates for so long, just to be in this horrible situation where I fantasize about it.<br><br>
But, honestly, I don't think it would work. DS cries with us present soooo much lately. There's no way our situation--or his state of being--would be improved if we left him by himself.<br><br>
Do what you can to get by. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><br><br>
P.S. It's hell on earth, especially when rundown and beaten up by exhaustion, but consoling him while putting him down on a twin mattress sounds like a good idea.<br><br>
P.P.S. I also second that your DS must be soooo tired that his little body can't switch to sleep. Sleepless in America is a book I'd recommend when you get some rest. Maybe we MDC mamas can sum it up for you. IMO it's way too anecdotal and cute to read when you're in a really rough spot.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I am so sorry you are going through this too. It's so hard. And sleep deprivation IS used as a form of torture. Doesn't make me feel much better when I snap at dh or ds from sleep deprivation. I hope both of our lo start sleeping well soon. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"> That book sounds interesting. What is the premise of it?<br><br><br>
Right now I'm working on getting ds to nap. It feels like I'm fighting a angry seal at times <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">, but I'm definitely seeing some differences. If he gets in a 2-3 hr nap in the afternoon (around 3-4pm), he will sleep a lot better at night. He still goes to bed around midnight, but he's sleeping until at least 11am. I know it's not 'ideal' sleep times, but for now, it's working.<br><br>
I think I need to get really really strict about sleep routines. I was waiting for ds to show me he was tired to take him in, but the truth is he just keeps going. He hates naps/sleep because he wants to keep playing. He even told me if he could never nap/sleep, he would!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/bigeyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="bigeyes"><br><br>
Now that naps are working, does anyone have any tips for him to have more restful sleep. He wakes up a few times a night crying and rolling around, nurses for a bit, then falls asleep again. And he seems to do this after a couple hours of quiet sleep. He wakes up crying, even if I'm right next to him. Am I missing something?<br><br>
Ami
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,426 Posts
Hmmm. What's different in the logistics of naps vs. nighttime? Do you leave ds alone in the room while he's napping? Or do you lie on the bed next to his crib? It may be that having your dh in this tiny bedroom (his smell, the sound of his breathing, and apparently his uncontrolled negative language when your ds cries and disturbs his sleep) is creating an overstimulating situation at night.<br><br>
Could you rearrange the furniture so that the crib is at the foot of the bed with the side up, getting your ds farther away from your head (and your boobs) and farther away from your dh's head? That might help. At the very least he wouldn't be able to do the water-torture maneuver of plucking at your arm while you are trying to sleep.<br><br>
Can your dh crash on the couch (or a friend's couch) for a few nights while you are working on a routine with ds? I know it doesn't seem fair that you have to endure the crying while he gets to sleep, but if his contribution to the situation is to act like a big spoiled baby himself in the middle of the night, then maybe you are better off going this alone. (A lot of men who are really good dads in daylight completely stink at nighttime parenting, so don't fret too much if that's what's going on in your house. You gotta work with what life hands you.)<br><br>
As to the routine itself, if you can get the crib to the foot of the bed where he can't reach out and grab you, I think that would be worth a try. In your situation, I would also nightwean. What you want is for your child to sleep soundly for a good chunk of the night, and at his age I think waking to nurse might be interfering with that.<br><br>
Yes, he'll cry. Yes, you'll feel bad. But it sounds to me like both you and your dh feel pretty bad <i>all the time</i> right now due to the sleep deprivation. I really do think that the right course with a child this age is to tell them the truth, i.e. some version of "we need sleep to be healthy, none of us are sleeping enough right now, if we do not start sleeping more at night then we will all get sick," and then lie down and play possum. At intervals, you "wake up" and reiterate the message. If you are resolved, your ds will eventually adjust to the new world order.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
486 Posts
get your dh to trade sleep time with you.<br><br>
YOU need a nap in the evening, so he can sleep while you are up parenting this kid to sleep.<br><br>
myds didn't sleep through the night until he was maybe 26 months old. he sleeps ALL NIGHT LONG in his own bed (which we call his nest) we make it into a tent sometimes.<br>
sleep is fun.<br><br>
good luck, remember, you are not alone!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,236 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
UPDATE:<br><br>
We are all sleeping a LOT better recently.<br><br>
The BIG difference was listening to this Oprah radio on healthy sleep habits in children:<br><a href="http://www.oprah.com/media/20090921-radio-dr-oz-children-sleeping-habits" target="_blank">http://www.oprah.com/media/20090921-...leeping-habits</a><br><br>
One thing stood out, and that was that the kids that fight naps/sleep are actually sleep deprived. The less sleep deprived, the easier the child falls asleep. i would always let ds get out because he 'obviously' wasn't tired. No more. I even started putting ds to nap earlier than ever before (about 2-3hrs after waking) and he went down like a dream.<br><br>
I have been enforcing naps and longer sleep times. He will fight me, but eventually goes down to sleep. Fast forward 2-3 days, and while naps are still a bit of a struggle, it's NOTHING like it was. I'm also very firm with his bedtime. He HAS to be in bed by 11:30pm. Whether he instantly conks out or not, doesn't matter, we have to be in bed, with lights out at that time. He'll sleep until at least 10am.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/joy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="joy"><br><br>
The other thing I've done is stop 'keeping myself awake' tricks ds uses. Like tapping a foot while nursing. Or even nursing itself! If he keeps asking to switch boobs, more than 2 times, I tell him, "nope, finish up or let's cuddle". He'll either stay with the current side or delatch, roll over onto his side & we'll spoon together until he sleeps. I literally cannot let him fidget around. The more fidgeting, the longer he can keep himself awake.<br><br>
I also started 'overdressing' ds for bed. He is a notorious blanket kicker (like dh). So he sleeps in long pjs and a long sleeve shirt on top of his short sleeve t. Even here in Cali, it gets a bit chilly in the morning, enough for me to wrap myself in my blanket.<br><br>
I also had to re-train myself to sleep through--I was so used to waking up every hour or so I was still doing it! We are all doing a LOT better. Ds is acting much better, behaviorally, and dh & I are actually getting some rest!<br><br>
Anyways, I hope some of the above might help anyone else who has this problem/reads this thread.<br><br>
Ami
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top