Mothering Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm still plodding away at my first soaker using worsted weight and size 10 needles. Next time around could I use a larger needle to help the process speed up a little bit? What size could I use that would still be functional and not make stitches that are too loose for a soaker?
Also, does the yarn have to be worsted weight? I have some sport weight that is absolutely beautiful and my grandmother has a pattern for some very pretty shorties with lace looking cuffs that I'd love for her to try. Will a lighter yarn like that still work?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,776 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by Perogi
I'm still plodding away at my first soaker using worsted weight and size 10 needles. Next time around could I use a larger needle to help the process speed up a little bit? What size could I use that would still be functional and not make stitches that are too loose for a soaker?
Also, does the yarn have to be worsted weight? I have some sport weight that is absolutely beautiful and my grandmother has a pattern for some very pretty shorties with lace looking cuffs that I'd love for her to try. Will a lighter yarn like that still work?
It's all about gauge and the density of the finished fabric. You can use lighter weight yarn, but you have to go waaaaay down in needle size (from a 10), unless you want an "airy" look.
I'm surprised you're using size 10 needles with worsted weight yarn. I just finished a pair using size 5 needles. Are you a tense knitter? My knitting was really tight when I started, and now I have to keep going down in needle size as it gets looser. Good luck!


BTW, which pattern are you using?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,933 Posts
You will really be surprised at how much faster your second soaker goes, and I get faster all the time. In general I think that soakers look and work much better when you use the recommended needles for your yarn type (btw I use size 8 for worsted weight yarn). A better option than sizing needles up is to size yarn up-- use bulky weight yarn (fabric connection has some good ones).

But, yes, you can use sport weight yarn. Depending on the kind of wool, it may not be dense enough to stand up to a heavy wetter, but that would only mean that you'd use them during the day.

Karla
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,655 Posts
The gauge is typically somewhere around 5 to 5.5 stitches per inch. I need US size 7 in order to get somewhere in there with worsted weight yarn. I was using US size 6 and getting 6 stitches per inch so I understand how you feel. It went so much faster when I got those size 7 needles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,776 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by Perogi
I think we are having some sizing confusion....
I am using US size 3, metric size 3.25, Canadian size 10.
So by the sounds of it I can size up a bit next time!
I didn't even know Canadians had different sizes! :LOL Silly American...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,171 Posts
I use 3mm needles (loving my Addi bamboo circs!) and get 7 sts per inch -- I can only think in metric for needle sizes!
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top