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DS is just over 3. We've been a little concerned that he speech is lagging behind so I took him for a ST eval. She said that he is slightly behind, but makes good sounds and uses his mouth well. She is concerned about his receptive language and social receptive skills.<br><br>
During the 1.25 hour eval he laid on the floor for half of it playing with a farm set. (I think he was just starting to get the cold he has now). He would not look at her when called and would not come to play a "tea party" with her. She was concerned about his lack of eye contact at times (other times he looked at her and me just fine). Now I don't know what to think. Most of the things she mentions as concerns he does just fine with at home. He is able to make his needs known very well. One thing he does not do so much right now is if you ask him a question like "What did we have for lunch today, or where did we go this morning?" He will not answer.<br><br>
So, my MIL (who is not very involved with DS) was contacted by my DH. She is an early childhood educator with many masters degrees. What she has seen of DS does not jive with what the ST saw.<br><br>
MIL feels that DS is fine, but maybe lagging in speech a bit because he is with DH and I all the time, with limited exposure to other kids. She feels DS might benefit from enrollment in Kindermusik, swim lessons, Tot groups, etc. She is not in agreement that DS should be evaled by early childhood and attend "school" M-F with other children that have speech problems.<br><br>
My head is spinning. How much does social interaction with other same age children help language? We go to the library, the children's museum at least weekly, and play with the neighborhood children...but the ages are all over (which I thought was a good thing).<br><br>
Ugh. I don't even know what should be the next step. MIL is coming over Monday night to share some materials. Sorry this thread is all over the place, so is my brain!!
 

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I'm sorry.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">How much does social interaction with other same age children help language?</td>
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It helps a lot because the other children give the kid no quarter. He has to communicate to be understood. They are also communicating more at his level and he can get there faster.<br><br>
Also, think about when you are at the library- are you constantly talking? Is he constantly required to talk? Count the words. Children are constantly talking. They don't shut up. It is thousands of repetitions of short phrases in a short period of time.<br><br>
I am not an expert, that's what I've been told by my mom when I was worried about my daughter, who is about 1.5 years younger than your son. She also started to talk much more when she spent more time with groups of kids. "Much more" being, 5 - 10 words in DH's native language.
 

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I completely agree with Mahtob. I personally think interaction with peers helps tremendously with language development and have witnessed that first hand with dd. Playing and negotiating with other kids is a HUGE motivation for speaking. Especially the negotiating part, because you can't get by without language. For example, if dd wants to play with another child's toy, she knows that it is not acceptable to just grab it away. She must ask to play with it. She must say that she would like a turn. And if another child wants her toy, she must explain that she is still playing with it, and that they can have a turn later. But even beyond such toddler negotiations, she loves playing with her friends and has found language to be a great tool in that--she and her friends have the sweetest toddler converstations, they also tell each other about what they have done or seen recently, sing songs for each other, teach each other rhymes. They really seem to feed off of each linguistically and they do learn words from each other. I know this for a fact because several of dd's friends now know numerous Russian words which I have heard them use while playing : Also dd's English is great (maybe even stronger than her Russian at this point)--that is not the language we speak at home, so she is learning A LOT of it from the other kids.<br><br>
...<br><br><br>
.....
 

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I learned it from you after you told me and I went and looked it up on the Internet, EVC. So, actually this only counts as 1.5 opinions.
 

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My ds turns 3 in a few weeks and has been in EI for just under a year. When he turns 3 he will start a special pre-school in a neighborhood school focusing on his speech. He'll be with other kids his age and will receive one on one time with an SLP.<br><br>
He has had little to no interaction with other kids, let alone kids his age because we do not have access to a car most days and in our complex, most of the families are Spanish speakers only.<br><br>
Though he has all the sounds to make words, at home with me he doesn't need to use words...and knows that eventually I will give in and do the communicating for both of us. I know that ds will thrive with other kids and in school in general, and with all of the information and communication with the administrative side of EI I feel very comfortable.<br><br>
I've always known that more social interaction would benefit ds, but it's hard when you can't actually get out (no car) and money is not available for things like kindermusik or Gymboree types of things.<br><br>
Good luck, and maybe if you don't feel the evaluation was done when your ds was himself-you can always contact the SLP and ask for a new eval.
 

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Honestly, I think you've got to be careful. Depending on what's going on (and whether the speech therapist or MIL are correct in assessment) peers can make it worse. You want him to have the skills to be successful in interactions and gain confidence. Not to fail. Most kids pick up those skills through interaction yes. But some kids with developmental differences do not. They need another approach.<br><br>
Does he consistently respond to his name at home?<br><br>
He's your first I take it? And grandparents (and sometimes parents) are notoriously slow to see differences in their grandkids. No matter the issue impartial is probably more accurate than a relative. However he well could have had an off day due to illness. Certainly. I wonder if they would do another look when he feels better? Deciding which of those is the case is probably important. The things the therapist was mentioning are flags for autism spectrum (which is not the end of the world; my son is mildly affected) and if you know you can help him.<br><br>
So my suggestion is to try to figure out what you're dealing with.<br>
Some links to help with knowing whether it <span style="text-decoration:underline;">might</span> be spectrum stuff (these aren't diagnostic but would help in deciding whether further looking might be good):<br><a href="http://www.childbrain.com/pddassess.html" target="_blank">http://www.childbrain.com/pddassess.html</a> (assessment tool to tell you whether spectrum might be possible; gives a score but is not diagnostic and of course depends on your perceptions)<br><a href="http://www.autismweb.com/signs.htm" target="_blank">http://www.autismweb.com/signs.htm</a> (signs of spectrum stuff; some that the therapist was mentioning)<br><a href="http://www.bbbautism.com/diagnostics_psychobabble.htm" target="_blank">http://www.bbbautism.com/diagnostics_psychobabble.htm</a> (description that uses lots of examples of what you might see in each category)
 

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Speech therapist are that - SPEECH therapist. This doesn't have to do with speech. I'm glad she told you she has concerns as it is her professional duty but she isn't qualified to do much more than that. I would recommend an eval with a developmental and maybe even an occupational therapist.
 

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What the speech therapist did was mention things that concerned her. She did not give you a specific dianosis b/c she is aware that his behavior in the unfamiliar enviornment of her office may not be his typical behavior, and she is not trained for the kind of evaluation that would be needed. Her simply pointing a few things out and raising them as concerns is just what she should do.<br><br>
I don't know what specific training your MIL has, but she is not an objective observer. She may or may not be qualified to evaluate childrens developement, and she may have some good information to pass along. However, she is not completely objective when it comes to diagnosing her own grandson.<br><br>
Since your son was coming down with a cold it most likely explains his not wanting social interaction, but I would get the evaluation anyway. It will help put the matter to rest so that it isn't nagging in the back of your mind making you worry.
 

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Since your son was getting sick, I agree that a second evaluation would make sense.<br><br>
Also, there are many ways to have a child interact with other kids--playgroups being the big one that seems appropriate here.<br><br>
My son was in speech therapy from 9 to 12 months. It didn't take much to get him on track. Now he is 26.5 months and his speech is great.<br><br>
If another evaluation shows he needs some assistance, and you are not comfortable with the local school district, ask the therapist to work with you to find other ways to get his needs met.
 
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