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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My dd just turned a year a couple of weeks ago and rarely eats anything in terms of solids. She is formula fed so she gets a bottle, and that is pretty much her only source of nutrition. I know a lot of people say this is normal and she will eat when she is ready, but I've also seen a lot of posters mention something about their dc having food sensory issues. Can anyone tell me what this is, and what the signs are? Or if there are other food issues I should look out for in case there is something else here?<br><br>
Dd will eat a few bites of 'dry stuff' - mainly cheerios, toast, veggie puffs, that sort of thing, but hardly anything in terms of other table foods or purees despite offering her every kind of food she is able to have (different tastes, textures, temperatures, etc) in every way we can think of (mesh feeder, spoon feeding, self feeding, etc). She seems almost grossed out at stuff that is slippery - so basically everything except for grains.<br><br>
We had our 1 year wbv and will most likely be getting a new ped. She was pretty much useless and said that we should start limiting dd's bottles and formula intake and that since she has no reason to starve herself, she'll eat eventually. The thought of that nearly brings me to tears and goes against every bit of my 'mother's intuition'.<br><br>
So I guess my questions are -<br><br>
When at the latest should she be eating table foods?<br><br>
What things should I look out for in case this isn't normal behavior in her case and there is some sort of underlying problem?<br><br>
Is there anything wrong with using bottles as opposed to a sippy cup? Like, could it interfere with tooth formation or something?<br><br>
We offer whatever we are eating plus cheerios and the like every night at dinner and sometimes for lunch. I 'suggest' it in that I'll pick up a piece for her and put it up to her hand to see if she'll take it form me, or eat a piece myself, but about 1/2 the time she'll take it, and very rarely does it stay in her mouth (she spits it out on purpose). Is this how I should be approaching it? Not a completely take it or leave it approach, but not forcing the issue either?
 

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i see no problem with what your doing, except for a mainstream ped.<br><br>
ds is 13mths, still pretty much EBF. he will take a bite or two here and there, hes only just starting on the little baby jarred foods, I'm going at his pace and keeping up his liquid nutrition.
 

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Sounds like she just needs to learn to eat in her own time. If she's gaining on the bottles, and exploring foods on her own then that's great. Try to offer her a small sample of what you eat on a plate of her own at the table. It's a great way to encourage kids to see that eating is part of being social. She can also play with the food and see you eating it, and want to try some eventually, too. For some kids it takes a lot of exposure to food before they actually eat it.<br><br>
Signs of sensory issues include severe gagging on certain textures. Purees and wet/soft foods are the worst.
 

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I'm currentl;y working with a mom who has a child with sensory issues, and the leader of our local Holistic moms is a spech-language therapist who deals with these types of sensory issues, and I've talked to her about it as well. They ARE REAL. Now, I don't know if your child has a sensory problem, but if so, the whole "he won't starve, he'll eventually eat" is TOTALLY WRONG...YES, a child with certain sensory disorders WILL STARVE rather than eat.<br><br>
That being said....it could be, and is liekly, that your child is just picky, LOL!<br>
Deifinitely continue formula..do not switch to cows milk, until you are certain she is getting adequate nutrition for solids..this could be well into the second year. Keep offering foods. If you want, get an evaluation by early intervention......a sensory problem is nothing to mess with.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>bobandjess99</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6465852"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm currentl;y working with a mom who has a child with sensory issues, and the leader of our local Holistic moms is a spech-language therapist who deals with these types of sensory issues, and I've talked to her about it as well. They ARE REAL. Now, I don't know if your child has a sensory problem, but if so, the whole "he won't starve, he'll eventually eat" is TOTALLY WRONG...YES, a child with certain sensory disorders WILL STARVE rather than eat.</div>
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<br>
Yep, that's why my child has a feeding tube.
 

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I know of someone who doesn't start her children on solids until well after a year. Our ped was the one who suggested we delay solids until at least a year, due to our history of food and environmental sensitivities (though I think she would have suggested it to anyone, just we're people who would think it's a good idea).<br><br>
My guy stopped that just after 11 months, but it took him until around 15 months to really pick it up with eating. He refused all purees, and my purchased-years-before Happy Baby Food Grinder has never been used in my house. He's always been perfectly content to eat the food that interested him in whatever form it was in at the time. If he didn't want it, he didn't eat it. No big deal.<br><br>
I think that perhaps the sensory stuff is almost something you figure out after the fact...someone with that in mind, looking at my kid at 13 months, might have wondered. But then at 16 months and today at 29 months, well, they would never even guess he was slow to pick up on solid foods. After the fact it's obvious he's OK, but while he was slowly starting it all, one person would have thought one thing, another person another thing.<br><br>
Coming from my point of view and experience with DS, I wouldnl't, personally, worry one more minute about it. I would imagine if it's TRULY a problem, you will figure it out at some point, so in the meantime, just honor that refusal of purees and similar foods (since she doesn't really NEED a puree anymore, I would imagine, that's a *baby* food sort of thing), keep up with her nutrition otherwise, and she'll show ya what she needs, I'm sure. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Ok, I have two kids both of whom have had eating "issues"<br><br>
DD Janelle is 4 years old. She didn't eat a bite of solids despite our trying till 11 months old, and even then it was just like one baby spoon sized bite a week, if that. She didn't start eating 1 meal of solids a day every day till 15 months old, and then that was just one ice cube sized serving of pureed fruit/veggies...she stuck with this till about 17 months old when she started refusing to be spoon fed and went to table food, still just a teeny tiny amout of something, like 1/16th of an avocado chopped into bite sized pieces. My son was born when she was 18 months old and she went back to full time nursing an no solids for about a month to a month and a half at that point...she didn't start eating 3 meals a day till she was 3 years old, and at 4 that's where she still is. She is picky in that she refuses to eat meat of any sort (chicken, turkey, pork, beef) but she will eat all seafoods and all veggies and fruits with no issue what so ever...so not horribly picky, she just doesn't eat much.<br><br>
DS Kincaid is 2 1/2...his issues are sensory related. He doesn't realize he is hungry and he doesn't enjoy eating/food/tastes much...if we do find something he likes it's cause we have mixed hot sauce or lemon juice into it, and still it is hit or miss.<br><br>
The way it is different between the two is Janelle always nursed...she nursed up untill about 2 months ago, and never ever ever refused that. Nursing was ALWAYS hard with Kincaid...he hated to nurse from day one, getting him to eat has always been a struggle...strangely we got him started on solids really young, just cause at that point in his life he was more willing to eat pureed fruit than breast milk... He self weaned before he turned 2, and I tried for months and months to get him to latch back on...it just won't happen. There are times he goes days without eating anything, we've been threatened with feeding tubes many times but always seem to dodge it.<br><br>
Also the other thing that shows us it is sensory related is that when Caid is getting regular OT he eats a LOT better than like over the summer when he got OT once a month. He actually lost weight over the summer, 9-10lbs, and now that he has been back in school for 6 weeks and getting OT a few times a week he has regained 4 of those lbs!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>USAmma</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6465626"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Signs of sensory issues include severe gagging on certain textures. Purees and wet/soft foods are the worst.</div>
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That totally depends on the kid! What sets off one kids sensory system is the only thing another kid with sensory issues is willing to eat!<br><br>
Pureed food is one of the things we can get our DS to eat sometimes...pureed fruit, hot sauce, and yogurt mixed up together...so disgusting!
 

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i found this website while perusing the web for more info about solids and oral sensory skills. i found it very interesting and helpful and thought you might, too: <a href="http://pacificcoast.net/~twendorf/strategies11.html" target="_blank">http://pacificcoast.net/~twendorf/strategies11.html</a><br><br>
~claudia
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks so much for all the responses!<br><br>
I don't think dd has any sensory issues, but when I see most babies half her age eat 4x as much as she does, I start to get paranoid.<br><br>
Shen doesn't really gag too much, and no where close to what I would call 'severe'. I think it's that she still has a little bit of gag reflux maybe? She rarely does it and it's not near as dramatic as it was when we first tried solids around 6mo...almost looks like she tasted something gross, but it's usually after the third or fourth bite. She loved nursing, although required the use of a shield, and now loves her bottles.<br><br>
Today and yesterday she actually did exceptionally well, although I'm hesitant to call yesterday a good day because it was basically dessert food - 'blueberry buckle' (gerber blueberries with sugar basically...I let MIL feed it to her because I didn't think she actually eat it) Today for breakfast she had apple and blueberry puree, lunch was a complete miss, but for dinner she had maybe 2 shells of pasta in maranara sauce total, which was several bites for her, and a couple bites of hamburger.<br><br>
I only gaver her 2-3 pieces at a time on her tray, and that seemed to help, whereas before I would give her several pieces and assume she would just take what she wanted. Actually, now that I think about it, we had a dog growing up with the same problem. If you gave him several treats at once, he'd pick one up, spit it back out, and go to the next one...just too overwhelmed and too excited to know which one to eat first<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">"he won't starve, he'll eventually eat" is TOTALLY WRONG...YES, a child with certain sensory disorders WILL STARVE rather than eat.</td>
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This is what I had guessed. The ped didn't ask any questions to see if she may have a sensory issue, or other problem before making that statement and I didn't bother to ask as I didn't trust her judgement on the issue after that. Unfortunately very few docs around here are open to not vaxing, so we'll stick with her (only going to CMA in case of CPS anyways) and we should be moving to a new area this summer, if not definitely by fall.
 
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