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Anyone heard of this treatment?? Anyone use it?<br><br><br>
Today DS was at the DR for yet another ear infection (thanks to MIL sneaking him dairy over the weekend! GRR!), the doctor broached the subject today of peptide injections to treat his allergies (including his ana. peanut allergy).<br><br>
She said that it binds to the cells that recognize certain foods as allergies and that most kids have a dramatic result after the first shot. She thinks that DS is a perfect candidate. We have spent 6 weeks doing the elimination diet, most symptoms have resolved - yet he still has eczema. I have found a definite soy allergy and atleast intolerance to dairy and egg as well. We have tried the immuno profile but we can't manage to draw blood from DS (he is only 20months).<br><br>
She said it is used to treat allergies, inflammatory diseases (like lupus), etc. That it has been used for years in Europe and that it has come over here about 2 years ago. SHe said it is like an "immune booster." She said that it will make it possible for him to eat allergens like dairy and soy without having a reaction - within moderation of course. And that it can help decrease his severity of his ana peanut allergy (which is a contact allergy at this point, severe and scary beyond words). Honestly it is the possibility of decreasing his severity of the peanut allergy that makes this so alluring to me. Not that I would ever feed him anything peanut, but to be able to go shopping and use a cart without wiping it down a 100 times and anxiously watching him to monitor for a reaction - that would be such a relief.<br><br>
After reading the literature she gave me, the peptides bind to Tcells - but only certain Tcells (is this possible??) that respond to the allergens. My concern is that it is involving his Tcells - a major component of the immune system. Which do plan to discuss with her next week when we follow up on his ears and on this topic.<br><br>
Just wondering if anyone has any info and/or experience with this. TIA!
 

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Hi, NatureGirl:<br><br>
My understanding of this type immunotherapy is that it is an attempt to expose the child's immune system to the allergen while reducing the risk of an anaphylactic reaction. It uses short pieces (i.e., peptides) of the allergen instead of whole allergen proteins in order to avoid the areas of the allergen that bind to IgE, the immunoglobulin that is responsible for anaphylactic reactions. So the body's immune system "sees" the allergen, but it does not get exposed to the part of the allergen that can trigger an anaphylactic reaction.<br><br>
There's a review article about it in the March 2007 edition of Allergy, entitled <a href="http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1398-9995.2006.01309.x" target="_blank">Peptide Immunotherapy for Allergic Diseases</a><br><span style="color:#0000FF;"><br>
[T]he use of whole allergen preparations is associated with an unacceptably high prevalence of allergic adverse events during treatment. Many approaches to reduce the allergenicity of immunotherapy preparations whilst maintaining immunogenicity are under development. One such approach is the use of short synthetic peptides which represent major T-cell epitopes of the allergen. Major potential advantages of this approach include markedly reduced capacity to cross-link immunoglobulin-E and activate mast cells and basophils, and ease of manufacture and standardization...</span><br><br>
...<br><br>
As for things binding to or activating certain types of T cells, yes, that is possible. There are several types and subtypes of T cells in the body. All immunotherapy would have to involve T cells to some degree.<br><br>
Hope that made some sense and helped. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 
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