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Ok, so I'm trying REALLY hard to not be a "yeller". I try not to yell "NO!" when my 10 month old DS pulls dirt from the houseplants for the millionth time, and I try not to yell when he insists on sticking his hands in the dog's water bowl. BUT, for some reason, I can't seem to not yell at our dog!<br><br>
DS is babbling alot these days (we call it baby jibber-jabber) and he's also into pointing at things. Yesterday I was yelling at the dog for swooping in and eating DS's cheerios. The jibber-jabber coming from DS got louder and more forceful. He started pointing at the dog and looked at me with a big smile on his face, like "look at me mommy! I can do it too!". It made me feel AWFUL.<br><br>
I've worked so hard to not yell <b>AT</b> DS that I never even thought about how I yell <b>AROUND</b> him. So, today's a new today and I've already reminded myself 12 thousand times to not yell at the dog. It's hard when it's already become a pattern!
 

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I have this problem, too. Once ds started yelling at our dog and cat, and saying "For heaven's sake, George!" I got the message that I need to stop. He also says a lot, "it makes you crazy" when she wanders around the kitchen during meals, repeating what I've said a million times. And he's tried to push our cat off of things, since I push her off the kitchen table and counter. It's very hard to gd a dog and cat, though! If I don't raise my voice or physically force them, they ignore me.
 

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I have the same problem as Colleen. DH always yells at our cats or smacks them and they ignore me completely. All DH has to do is stand and act like he's going to move towards them and they bolt. I can march right over to them and they'll ignore me completely. How can I get them to behave if they ignore me?
 

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I am always afraid that the mail man or someone going by will here me yelling at my dog and think i am yelling at the kids!!! My dog is a bit high maintenace, and I find myself always yelling, because when I just talk, he will not listen..hmmmm. I keep wondering if the mailman thinks I am a terrible mommy!!!
 

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Wanted to note, it doesnt help my dog has a humanish name, James, so it probably does sound like I am talking to one of the kids!!!!!
 

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I am so, so struggling with this. Since having ds I have come to realize that I have been a mainstream dog owner for years! I want badly to change, but often don't feel like I have any patience or gentleness left inside me after a long day with a teething toddler. And when I do, the dogs ignore me until I ramp up to a harsh tone. I hate that ds hears us speaking that way <i>ever</i>, but I'm not sure what else to do.
 

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Wow, I never really thought of that. James (my ds) will grab at the dog, I don't think he's ever yelled at her. It's kind of a joke in our house that James is going to tell someone his dogs name is "D****t Shadow!" because we're always hollering at her for getting into stuff...and more recently having accidents.
 

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The same thing has been happening at our house with our three cats. I used to be very GD with the cats, until DD came along. They have been showing some undesirable behaviors and sometimes I really feel out of patience with them. DH has never had much patience when they've misbehaved and has always raised his voice to them or made threatening gestures. (Never actually hits them though.)<br><br>
Recently, DD has been yelling at the cats or chasing them around. She even makes some of the same faces as her daddy. It was cute the first few times, but then we thought how embarrassed we would be if she treated someone else's pet that way, especially if we were guests in their home.<br><br>
Since then, I have tried to model "good pet discipline" around DD. DH hasn't been much help, though. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:
 

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Yeah, the same here <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> Sometimes I feel like I am taking it all out on our dog because I try to GD my DS. I don't have ANY patience left for my dog.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Yin Yang</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Yeah, the same here <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> Sometimes I feel like I am taking it all out on our dog because I try to GD my DS. I don't have ANY patience left for my dog.</div>
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Yeah, me too. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> Somehow dh is always patient with them. Maybe because he's not home all day.
 

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With cats...carry around a squirt bottle, and squirt them if they are bad. I get irritated with my dog too...she is a 10mo 10pound Rat terrier, that is a PITA to house break, and Im potty training a 3yo and 2yo...and the dog pushes me over the edge. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:
 

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Well, as much as I don't want to model yelling for ds, I think that squirting the dogs would be worse. The dogs would find it very scary and ds would see me literally shooting them with something to control them. I'm looking for <b>gd</b> techniques that will work with dogs.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>uuelisabeth</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Well, as much as I don't want to model yelling for ds, I think that squirting the dogs would be worse. The dogs would find it very scary and ds would see me literally shooting them with something to control them. I'm looking for <b>gd</b> techniques that will work with dogs.</div>
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If you are looking for a GD for dogs you MUST have a book The Dog Listener by Jan Fennell. She was inspired by the work of Monty Roberts (the horse whisperrer), and she does not believe in ANY kind of voilence whatsoever. She believes in willing cooperation ofr dogs. It's a great book.
 

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I didnt say anything about squirting the dog...I said cats..because a pp said her cats didnt listen at all. I use positive training with the dog....and she spends a lot of the day either leashed to me, so I can correct her when need be...and make sure she doesnt pee anywhere. That is the quickest way to train a dog to have nice manners. Tie the leash to your belt or hold the end, and just have her go wherever you go. If she does something you dont want her too, you can correct immedietly....and praise her the second she does the right thing. I trained many dogs quickly with that method...abused rescue dogs, that had no house manners, were aggressive with strangers, and they learned very fast and learned that people were safe. I just find it oddly amusing, that after all that, my 10lb wonder beast of a dog is giving me such a hard time with house breaking...its very irritating..especially when potty training 2 toddlers. My 3yo will miss the toilet and pee all over the floor....then after cleaning that our, I notice that the dog has had a bad accident. Somedays when dh asked how my day went...I tell him that body waste would be the theme of the day. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:
 

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I have this exact same problem.<br><br>
I NEVER used to yell at our dogs! Now it seems like they can't do anything right, the poor things.<br><br>
It's like I only have enough patience to not yell at one member of the family. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
I am working on this as well. At least after I had children I stopped cuffing them. I mean cuff like a gentle smack, not a handcuff.
 

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Take your dog to some obidience training, it really helps. When the dog has done wrong and needs to listen to you, scruff it. I mean grab it by the loose skin on the back of the neck, you don't have to grab hard, most dogs respond to a very gentle grab, give it a light shake if you need more doggie attention. This is what mama dogs do to pups when they are bad. After you have its attention you can help it to behave better. if it is barking or eating when it should not I gently put my hands around the muzzle and tell it no or quiet.<br>
I also suggest having a "time out" area to put the dog. a pen outside or quiet room or even crate in a quiet place. Don't use it as punishment but a dog needs a retreat from a hectic household and you get a break from the pet. You may find the best way to use time out with a dog is to put it there at the time of day (every day the same) when it gives you the most trouble.<br>
Of course don't expect it to like that if you have been gone all day and it is just happy to see everyone. But if people are there all day the dog may get over stimulated or just plain tired and iritated. Most dogs are going to need some amount of training to become enjoyable pets, if you or someone in the house does not have the time or desire to train don't get the pet. If you have a child 9 years or more that wants the dog the investigate your local 4-H, most areas have a good k-9 program, is as good for the kid as the dog.<br><br>
as for potty training many dogs will go where they smell waste. If they smell your kids peeing around then they might do it too. I had a very good dog who NEVER went in the house except when we visited my SIL who had a not very potty trained dog and a sort of potty trained son who liked to pee in the house plants, then my dog would go where ever he smelled that they had gone.<br><br>
I don't speak cat so I don't have good ideas for them<br><br>
Just like kids yelling at pets doesn't acomplish anything positive. Hitting or other physical punishment can easily make them aggressive, maybe to your kids.
 

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I'm a gd pet owner and gd mom. I still have a lot to learn. But, too many times ds has heard me say "Grace, down." Not yelling and he tries to tell her what to do. "No, Gace." "Get down Gace." etc. It's actually pretty funny to see him get serious with her - but I don't let him know that.<br><br>
Luckily, our dogs are pretty easy to handle and weeks can go by without a reprimand.<br><br>
But, this whole topic is interesting to me. We took our dogs to training classes at a young age and that's where we learned about not yelling, intimidating, hitting, etc. (not saying anyone here does that.) No matter how much we've worked with them, they still jump on us when we get home from work. (but, at least they know better with ds or any other kids.)
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>peilover010202</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">No matter how much we've worked with them, they still jump on us when we get home from work.</div>
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There is very simple solution to this one: IGNORE IRNORE IGNORE. When you come home, igrnore your dogs NO MATTER WHAT they are doing! NEVER have an eye contact, never say a word to them, just pretent like they do not exist. Give them 5-10 minutes and they will give up, and go do their own business.<br>
This is very well written in the book I mentioned above - The Dog Listener. Any time you leave your pack and come back it's another chance for your dog to establish a new leadreship, but acknowlaging them when you come home you give them the leadership, that's why they jump. They are trying to get an eye contact with you, which is what they need to know "Good, I am still the leader here". If you avoid that, and ANY kind of acknowlagment they will totally change their behaviour. Once they are call and not jumping, then it's time for you to call them. The LEADER makes the decisions. So YOU need to decide when you are ready to welcome them <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"> Try it, it works like a charm! After few days they won't even bother to come!
 
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