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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How many moms out there have very sore nipples and have literally tried EVERYTHING???<br><br>
Apparently it's very common for baby to be tongue tied. That's where the frenulem (a tiny flap of skin similar to cartilage) is too tight or too close to the edge of baby's tongue.<br><br>
The thing is that when women in the 50's started being told to formula feed there was no need to check for it, and Dr's forgot how to do it or look for it.<br><br>
And midwives back in the day just kept one fingernail long and swept under the baby's tongue and under front lip to check for it at birth. The skin is there on every in-utero baby but is supposed to retract and dissapear closer to birth. If she found a strand she's simply pinch it. Toddlers who still had a short frenulum have been known to fall and cut their own off!<br><br>
Right after birth if done does not pose any problems as it's still thin and no blood is in there. The Dr. simply clips the cartilage a little bit and baby usually does not bleed or bleeds a drop or 2 and baby can nurse right away afterwards.<br><br>
After a few months or years it can be a little scarier for Dr's to do it if they are not experienced in case baby bleeds. If done later they may do a dab of local anesthetic and 1-2 stitches. The whole thing takes 15 min or so. This is why so many Dr's are hesitant to clip it. If left it can do serious damage to speech later as baby learns to talk, and forget about a normal nursing relationship! Some babies are super lucky and have a Dr that does it rt away with no problems, or an LC or LLL leader who may work with mom to help baby learn to latch on deeper if they cannot find anyone to clip it.<br><br>
Honestly I haven't found anything to warrant a reason NOT to clip it! In other countries it's still regularly checked for after birth. The US is still a bottle feeding culture, unfortunatly it's not going to change until we insist on it. Tell your Dr to clip it, dont ask, if you suspect it. It can't hurt and baby will nurse better right away!<br><br>
Check out these links for info and great pics, and do your own research:<br><br><a href="http://www.breastfeedingbasics.com/html/tonguetie.shtml" target="_blank">http://www.breastfeedingbasics.com/html/tonguetie.shtml</a><br><br><a href="http://www.breastfeeding.com/helpme/helpme_asklc_ans107.html" target="_blank">http://www.breastfeeding.com/helpme/...lc_ans107.html</a><br><br><a href="http://www.lalecheleague.org/NB/NBNovDec03p212.html" target="_blank">http://www.lalecheleague.org/NB/NBNovDec03p212.html</a><br><br><a href="http://www.lalecheleague.org/llleaderweb/LV/LVAprMay02p27.html" target="_blank">http://www.lalecheleague.org/llleade...rMay02p27.html</a><br><br><a href="http://www.drjain.com/" target="_blank">http://www.drjain.com/</a>
 

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My daughter was born with third degree ankyloglossia. We met with an ENT and I consulted an oral motor therapist as well. I decided not to have the frenectomy performed. There is some current data to suggest that clipping the tongue in an office setting with scissors or a scalpel can lead to scar tissue and actually compound the issue. There are other methods that require general anesthesia, and I just wasn't ready to put my peacefully homebirthed baby through that.<br><br>
Despite a horrible latch and some painful nipple damage, we were able to work through our breastfeeding issues. We worked on tongue exercises suggested by our LC and her tongue seemed to loosen around 8-10 weeks and feedings were no longer excruciating. If our breastfeeding relationship had been at high risk, however, I would have opted for the surgical route.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Cool! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br><br>
Good for you!<br><br>
You are soo lucky to have found someone who could help you train your dd for a better latch! That's awesome!
 

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How common is tongue tie? If my first dd had no problems with something like this, what is the likelihood that my second baby will/will not have problems? Is it hereditary?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It is more common than we know, just that most Dr's are taught it will "go away" with time<br><br>
Yes, it can be hereditary. But if you've nursed one child successfully, most likely you'll know if something "feels wrong" and be able to get help soon enough.
 

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two of my ds's had this, and a few days after they were born, the got it clipped. It was very simple and they didn't even cry. One way you can tell if your baby has this is because the tip of the tongue looks a little different - it looks a little separated, like something is pulling it from beneath.
 

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funny that i just saw this post. adrian nursed fine for the first 2 mo, but then went on a 3 mo plus nursing strike - would only eat at night - due to reflux and tummy pain. we had to wean to neocate for medical reasons, and now that he is bottlefed have found that he has mild tongue tie. he's 7 mo old and can't stick his tongue out - it curls to the side - and clearly has difficulty sucking on a bottle.<br><br>
we are going to see an ent and prob. will have it clipped under local or general, simply b/c he has so many feeding issues. even if it only helps a small amt, we want to do all we can to encourage him to eat enough to avoid a feeding tube.<br><br>
thanks for the links!
 
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