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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Lydiah</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15358799"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Does anyone have a super easy method to make sourdough starter?</div>
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I don't know how you define easy, but I have found it very effective to start with 2 cups of rye flour and 2 cups of water, stir and every day measure another cup of water and flour each into a new bowl. Stir in the older mixture to the newer one with a wooden spoon. Keep covered with a cloth. After a week, you have your starter.
 

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I did this last week, and the first loaves were great. The nice thing about this one is that it's also a no-knead bread.<br><a href="http://www.maryjanesfarm.org/Recipes-Patterns-Instructions/no-knead_bread-2.asp" target="_blank">Sourdough Starter - Mary Jane</a><br><br>
I pretty much followed her directions exactly. My second baking is rising right now.<br><br>
The Los Angeles Times also did a weekend project on making your own sourdough starter - it looked pretty straightforward too. I think their secret ingredient was pineapple juice in place of water at the beginning.<br><br>
I have also read that rye flour gives good results . . .
 

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I have built three SD starters using different ways. They all works. Most SD starter recipes work as long as you have the most important ingredient: patience.<br><br>
I built one by capturing wild yeast; it took me about 10 days to get it going. I used just whole wheat flour, water, and a couple of raisins. I keep this one for making whole wheat bread.<br><br>
Just for fun, I built another one using commercial yeast to kick start. Yup, you could do that too. Some people say it's not true sourdough. In the beginning, it's not because all the activities were results of the commercial yeast. But as you continue to feed the starter as you would to your wild yeast starter, it will eventually rid of all the commercial yeast then you will have a starter. It worked very well for me for about 3 months then I decided to get rid of it. There's no point to keep two whole wheat starter at home.<br><br>
The last one is an unbleached starter; just started five days ago. I used kefir whey, unbleached flour, and nothing else. I mixed equal parts of whey and flour, discard and feed the starter as what I'd do with the water/flour starter. Took only four days and I had just made a loaf of SD bread yesterday. Turned out beautifully. Now, I use just water and unbleached flour to maintain it. This is the one I use when I make everything but whole wheat bread.<br><br>
So, there's more than one way to get to Rome, some are easier than others, but all takes time and patience. Give it a little TLC will go a long way. Best of luck!<br><br>
Al
 

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I have a method and it's SUPER easy. If you send a self-addressed stamped envalope to an adress that can be found on this site: <a href="http://carlsfriends.org/" target="_blank">http://carlsfriends.org/</a> a volunteer will send you a dried portion of a sough dough starter from 1847 for free.<br>
I just found about it the other day and I'm sending my envelope off tomorrow. I like the idea of a starter with a history.
 

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I use a glass jar because I can easily see the progress of the starter. Keep the lid lose, in case the starter becomes too active, so it won't explode on you. :)<br><br>
Where about in Alberta are you? I am in Calgary. If you're anywhere close I will be more than happy to just give you some.<br><br>
Al
 
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