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Ok, I *know* I shouldn't worry because DS is only 18 months, but I do anyways. He's been saying words for a few months now, but most of the words he says, he doesn't say the whole word. He only says the first part: "bi" for bike, "co" for car, "da" for dance, ect. A lot of his words sound exactly the same because he doesn't finish them so car sounds like go and dance sounds like da (dad).

And he gets very frustrated because he *wants* to say them right and sometimes he'll say a word, realize it didn't sound right and never try to say it again. One day, he pointed to a bunny and said "uh-e", I looked at him and said, "that's right, that's a bunny", he looked a me with a sad look on his face and shook his head and grabbed his ear (his sign for bunny). He never said it again. He's done that with quite a few words. It's like if he can't say it at all intelligible, he won't say it at all.

When do all the aspects of language fall into place so he can mimic sounds? He still can't make some sounds, like "S", "T", and "P" that I now of. He doesn't make any of the combination consonants like "sh" or "pl". He doesn't even attempt them. He doesn't mimic animals that I know of. I thought I heard him say "meow" the other day, but I'm not sure. He looooves dogs, but does not say dog or try to "woof woof".

I guess I'm just worried because he wants to talk but he's just not *quite* there as far as speech skills go. He still can't make so many sounds and that really limits his vocab. Is this normal for this age? It seems like sooo many other 18 months olds are talking up a storm. And I know I shouldn't compare
: , but his 12 month old cousin makes more sounds than he does.
 

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Don't worry. Its totally normal in this age. In the next six months you will see the sounds evolve further, but starting out with just part of the word is totally normal.

Also, don't be worried about "never saying it again"... He's most likely storing them up.

Development is not linear. Babies/toddlers will work on one skill (or word, or task, or whatever) at a time and so things kind of come in "fits and starts". You'll think "Wow! Look at how much dc is talking!", then they will move on to something else for a few weeks and not talk a whole lot but will start to be able to run a whole lot better or fit the blocks inside the holes in the box or something. The frustration will also ebb and flow as well, peaking around this time.

I know that we mothers, espceially of boys, are worried about language. But it sounds like your ds is totally on track! Don't stress it
. Enjoy these first words!
 

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Your ds is talking more than my ds at 18 mos. Heck, my ds didn't have a word he used consistently until he started mom and dad at 20 mos. He added more at 23 mos, and now he's adding words all the time. He doesn't really finish them either. There was an article posted a while ago that said that's normal in most cases. I'll try to find it.

However, in my totally unprofessional opinion, I *would* be concerned that your ds is bothered and frustrated by the fact that he can't finish words. Perhaps look up info on apraxia.
My ds was never bothered by his speech or lack thereof. If he had been, and it had gone on for a while, I might have considered calling EI to see what they think.

eta- here's the link http://www.contemporarypediatrics.co...ID=1&sk=&date=
quote from page 3

Quote:
Phonologic development is the gradual process of acquiring adult speech. The majority of children pick up most phonologic rules by age 5. For example, most children stop deleting the final consonant in words (as when a child says "cuh" instead of "cup") between ages 2 and 3. And children usually outgrow velar fronting by 3 years. An example of velar fronting is, "Mommy, tan you div me one?" (for "Mommy, can you give me one?"). In such cases, the child is replacing consonants made with the tongue moving toward the back of the mouth, such as "k" and "g," with consonants produced at the front of the mouth: "t" and "d."
 

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Don't worry too much about it, I had the same problem as you do with the speech with my 4 yo. Take it a day at a time and he will be speaking clearly in no time. I was really discoauraged (sp?) when my son couldn't pronounce all his words right, He too would only say the beginning of the word or just the last part of the word. And to make it a little worse he was trying to speak 2 languages at the same time. So, it was really confusing to understand what he was trying to say. Today he is talking really well besides a few mispronounced words but hes only 4.
 

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My ds didn't start "talking" till he was nearly 1 1/2, and that was only "ma" for momma.
He then didn't pick up any new words still he was almost 2 then he started expanding his vocabulary.. To this date ( 2 1/2 years old) i think the only words he can say correctly are "mommy", "puppy", "pee and poo", "kitty" and "car". All his other words are understandable but he can't seem to master the "n's" in "Bunny", so when ever he sees our bunny he yells out "BUH EEE!", or the "p" in "cup" so he says "cuh", and many other words .. i know eventually he will get it, he hasnt lost intrest in learning ( and by the sounds of it neither has your child ), so as long as we keep stressing the pronounciation he will keep copying till he gets it right.
 

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my 15 month old niece says just part of words a lot of time, like Ju for juice or pe for please, and I think that is perfectly fine.

Now my non-talking 26 month old is a different story...


I would wait until your ds is around 20-23 months old before being concerned - if you feel you need to be concerned at all. Of course, I totally don't take my own advice!
 

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Just an FYI

when 'we' (adults) speak, the end of the word is often much softer and harder to hear than the other parts of the word.

Take the word 'cat' vs. the word 'Tom'.

Even though both words have the sound 't', we pronounce it very differenlty depending on the position w/in the word. In 'Tom' we release a pressurized puff of air to really get the sound out. In 'cat' we just flick our tongue up to the roof of our mouth w/out realeasing that same pressurized puff of air.

So...

Kids have a hard time hearing those 'final consonants'.

What you can do is repeat what your child has said in a positive tone and emphasize the end of the word.

child: "bi" (pointing to a bike)
you: "yes, I see the bike" overemphasizing 'k' in bike.

That way you are not drawing attention to his error, just giving him a chance to hear the last sound on the word he just chose.

hth!
 

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Hmm, what you described in terms of not saying a whole word is very normal.

The only thing that makes me concerned is that he gets frustrated when he cannot say the word correctly - that is a sign of one of the axia's (can't remember which). Bear in mind it is just one sign out of many, many.
 
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