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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm not sure if this is the best place to post this. I'm wondering if any of you have children who have said something like this to you.<br><br>
Short preface, my dd is 5 and has always been very high energy and has a difficult time focusing her attention on directions. She can focus for long periods of time on coloring, painting, and other activities but isn't always able to focus on what people are saying to her. She has had problems in preschool and now in kindergarten with getting into trouble for not listening to her teacher.<br><br>
So, last night were sitting at the table together having a snack and she says to me, "My brain is always talking to me and I can't make it stop and I don't like it. It bothers me. When I'm eating, when I'm trying to sleep, even right now when I'm talking to you, it's always buzz, buzz, buzzing." I asked her what her brain says to her and she said it sounds just like when we talk, only that it never stops.<br><br>
Is this the active mind of a spirited child or something else? I'd like to talk to a professional about it but am apprehensive of the knee jerk ADD diagnosis.<br><br>
Thanks for an advise.<br><br>
Robin<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/joy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="joy">:
 

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Sounds exactly like my DH and at least 2 other friends I've got. Perfectly normal! All three of them happen to be exceptionally intelligent and very analytical/scientific--excellent critical thinkers! They're all really funny, too.<br><br>
I happen to possess an exceptionall quiet brain--I can actually space out and think of nothing at all. My DH can't, no matter how much he wants to. His brain is always on. The only time his brain gets quiet is after he's had a drink or two (not recommending alcohol consumption for your DD!!!).<br><br>
DH can focus on work for hours at a time, but unless I make sure I have his undivided attention, he won't hear what I'm saying to him (eye contact or physical touch will get him to focus on me). He also manages to drown out the noise in his head while listening to music--ever since he figured that out in high school, he always did homework with music on in the background. DH also has a hard time falling asleep b/c his brain keeps going. Usually a back rub will knock him out, though. Again, it's the physical touch that helps soothe/relax him.<br><br>
One of my friends describes her brain as never shutting up. She can't turn her brain off no matter how tired she gets. She's always thinking/analyzing a bunch of different topics all the time, which is great when she's trying to muster a variety of thoughts for an argument, but is a total pain when it's late at night and she wants to go to sleep.<br><br>
My DH and my 2 friends seem like natural entertainers--maybe just from channelling some of their inner "voices". All I know is that it's hysterical what my DH comes up with sometimes, and off the wall tends to be the norm with my 2 friends as well. Look on it as the ultimate source of creativity and embrace it! But you might also want to help your DD learn how to do focused relaxation exercises to figure out what works for her (breathing, massage, staring at a candle flame, exercise). HTH!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you so much for your response. That's exactly what I needed to hear.<br><br>
DD sounds a lot like your DH, and your friends, in temperament. She's definitely a natural entertainer, comedian and artist and I love that about her. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"><br><br>
She seems to be getting frustrated with the distraction though. And I want her to succeed at school. I'd really like to be able to give her the tools she needs to help her turn it down when she wants/needs to.<br><br>
I'll have to try music as a background noise, she certainly gravitates in the direction...her little body never stops moving. And physical and eye contact definitely helps to get her attention.<br><br>
If anyone has any other suggestions for ways to help her focus, especially at school, they would be greatly appreciated. Maybe I'll post in the Learning at School forum.<br><br>
Thanks again!
 

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I found a book at the library a few weeks ago with guided meditations/visualizations for children. I read some to my dd(4) who is also quite active and she loved them.<br>
Also, since your dd just started kindergarten she is probably out and about alot now; stimulated all day. Perhaps when she gets home from school you should limit other classes, outings, and errands so she can unwind playing at home. Maybe just some real down time could allow her to play through all that "stuff" going on in her brain.
 

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I forgot about the fidgets! DH fidgets all.the.time! He's a programmer, so he sits in front of the computer all day (not the greatest physical situation for him)--he copes by, at a minimum, jiggling one leg up and down all the time. Then he usually also has something in his hand(s). If it's a pen, he's tapping it. For a while he had a squeeze ball, but he eventually broke it--I doubt your daughter has the hand strength to do that, though. I think his latest distraction toy is a slinky.<br><br>
I'd recommend getting her (if you don't already have one) an exercise/birth ball to sit on. She'd be able to wiggle, rock, and roll, which is hard to do in a chair. It also might help her focus better. Has she noticed if her brain seems quieter after she's been really active? Maybe try some "experiments" to find out--like put on dance music and have her dance energetically for 5 minutes, then try to focus on something that usually is hard for her to do. See if it helps. Later in the day, try dancing for 10 minutes. Or running around the yard/house, skipping rope, whatever. Just to see if it helps or not (if it does, figure out how active she has to be to see a payoff).<br><br>
My DH does some of his best thinking while he's running/working out and when he's taking a shower (I think the soothing nature of the water as it's delivered in small droplet form from the showerhead is enough sensory input to keep his brain busy processing the physical sensation, but that's just my hypothesis.)...how busy is her brain after a bath/shower?<br><br>
I realize a lot of this won't help her during classtime, but if you can find things that work at home, then maybe you can adapt them (or enlist the teacher's cooperation) for school.<br><br>
Good luck!
 
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