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Discussion Starter #1
I hope someone else has experienced this...<br><br>
For over 6 months now, DS1 (3.75) has been spitting up and gagging on food. Occasionally, he "makes" himself throw up as well. I'm posting now because I just exploded at him for puking all over the carpet after lunch. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> This morning he gagged on a banana, then spit up a muffin and now this... ugh!! I strongly believe it's a texture thing since it's almost always the same types of food that make him gag (mushy textures), although culprits will change quite often (he's been fine eating rice cakes up to now, but has gagged on them 3 times this week). He's a great eater so it's not like we're restricted in what he eats, but this is getting really annoying.<br><br>
Here's what usually happens: he takes a piece of food (cracker, cheese, piece of fruit, meat, whatever...), puts it in his mouth and starts to chew, then he'll start whining and spitting it out of his mouth. Sometimes, if the piece is still somewhat intact (a chunk of apple, say) we just wipe off his mouth and he's fine, but with something more mushy (bread, cheese...) he'll typically keep on gagging until he pukes. He's not choking, there's nothing left in his mouth, but he'll keep heaving until he pukes.<br><br>
Last week he did that at the playground after eating a blackberry (one of his favorites, go figure) and the kids started making fun of him and telling him they didn't want to play with pukers. He was sad.<br><br>
When I ask him why he does that, he says it's because he doesn't want the offending food in his mouth and that he can't help retching until it's all gone. I should mention that he had GERD as a baby and was recently evaluated by 2 different gastroenterologists and all is well according to them. They weren't helpful at all and seemed to think this was just a phase. He's gaining weight and eats great, so I guess the problem is the stress that this is causing (for example, when we're out or when having/being guests and no knowing whether he'll gag/puke) and also the social issues for him (kids making fun of him). I've tried limiting eating to home and removing foods that I suspect will make him gag, but it's so random at times that this is not practical. I thought of posting in the SN forum as well since I strongly suspect a sensory/texture issue. Anyone?
 

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I'm going to take a guess, and say I think it sounds physical. Perhaps, there's something in his throat that makes it hard to swallow.<br><br>
Also, when possible, he should be sitting down. Most kids will choke when they are walking with food in their mouths. At least once or twice. His sounds more often that normal.<br><br>
I have had daycare kids who tried something that made them gag. I have actually said "Don't you dare throw up" Then I hand them a napkin and make them spit it out, but I won't let them throw up on their plates. LOL. It works too. I just can't say if it's the best way to handle it.<br><br>
When my daughter was about seven, a boy threw up in the pool. ONCE. It's been ten years, and I just saw on his facebook the other day where some kid said "Hey connor.. remember when you threw up in the pool?". So, apparently yakking in front of your friends is remembered forever.<br><br>
Before you try the "Don't you dare throw up" approach, I would first make sure there is nothing wrong in his throat that's causing him to gag. Even swolen tonsils can get the gag reflex going. He's still pretty young to control that by himself, and too young to know if there's something wrong. Especially if whatever is wrong feels like his "normal".
 

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I would suspect sensory issues relating to food, probably stemming from his GERD.<br><br>
I second the feeding therapy. What he seems to need help on is controlling his gag reflex. He may also need help to make sure he's chewing properly and sufficiently before he swallows. I would ask for a referral.
 
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