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Hello everyone! I don't post her often, as we do not have a Waldorf school near us. We are moving and have applied to the local Waldorf school in our new town.

I am totally fine with not watching tv - we watch too much at the moment, but that is waining and I am thrilled.

However, my son has gotten REALLY into Star Wars somehow! And I know other Waldorf-raised children in our area that have seen all the movies (my son and his friends are all five or just over five). My son has seen parts of the older three movies, but not the newer three.

He is completely obsessed with Star Wars though - even though he doesn't watch it much - and draws Star Wars characters at school, wakes up asking me questions about who the master Jedis are, etc. It's all very strange to me!

I don't really know what my question is - I guess maybe it's about balancing mainstream life with Waldorf life. Do other Waldorf children get into things like this? Is it "allowed?" Or should we nip it in the bud now before he officially starts at school?

Thank you!
 

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We were new to Waldorf this year, and for us the change has happened slowly over the year.

I cut TV our cold turkey last June. Once the weather was nice enough to spend more time outside, and we were taking a lot of weekend trips. It was MUCH MUCH easier than I expected, and I think our timing helped that.

As for "character" toys, clothing & books, we have been weaning those things out over the past 8 months. I started with collecting the items they never played with anyway (& therefore didn't miss) first. Then, as they received new toys for B-days, Christmas, etc. we weeded out the playroom to make room. And of course, the toys that went were all the character things. As they grew out of their branded clothing, it was replaced with non-character clothing. Etc. Etc. We still have items that are 'contraband' Waldorf, such as Barbies, but they play with them alongside their play-silks, gnomes, rocks and blocks & play food. Actually I was thinking of taking a few pictures because it is quite funny to see a very "Waldorf" playscape set up with a Barbie in it. Over time, the Barbies will go too.

It does bother me when other children come into the class with character clothing or when other 'waldorf kids' come to a birthday party bearing character gifts, but, as my DH reminds me, I am not the Waldorf police, and we are by FAR not a perfect Waldorf family.

If you can actively discourage the Star Wars fascination now, it might be easier that taking away an obsession later.

Beth
 

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Oh boy. Star Wars seems to be a biggie in my son's 1st grade class. I'm not thrilled about it to be quite honest but it really is the teacher's job to quell that stuff at school. The kids make star wars figures out of beeswax, act out scenes during recess, and at a recent birthday party I know there were some star wars themed gifts.

In all fairness we let DS watch tv when he visits with grandparents and yes, he has seen some of the movies. I don't think he would have made such an obsession over it though had it not been for some of his other classmates. Again, something the teachers should monitor in the class. Honestly, I think there are worse media characters than Star Wars but I personally get tired of hearing about it when we don't even have a tv.

OP, to answer your question I don't think it is a huge deal really. You should simply have a little talk with DS about how talking about this isn't allowed or appropriate at this school. I know the kindy teachers tell the kids "no tv talk", something like that. Of course like most kids it will probably come out in his play and the kids kind of feed off each other with that sort of thing. Then parents like me just hope the teacher is paying attention and moderating it.

Really, that's all you can do.
 

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We homeschool, and even among the homeschool waldorf crowd there has been a major star wars obsession. It faded after a while, I don't know that the parents could do very much to stop it. Sometimes when you are playing in the woods a stick just becomes a light saber. We tried to counter it a bit by finding similar hero stories to get into at home, like king arthur and robin hood. It seemed to help, a lot, and now robin hood is their hero of choice.

FWIW, soooo much has been written about star wars being the fairy tale or myth of the modern time. I think it does speak to the children (and adults) on a lot of deep levels. (Assuming of course, its the story they are moved by and not the merchandise.)
 

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I posted the same question a few weeks back. Whats going on? why are all 6 - 8 yr old boys SO into Star Wars? Like you, its driving me batty! I've been trying to find a happy medium for my son, because he's the new boy in school (a waldorf school, but he's starting in class 2 where the other kids have been together for a year already...) and he wants to fit in. Our kids do watch TV, but only dvds that we've screened, etc- no commercial tv, and only on the weekends. Like one of the other posters, I've slowly been trying to get rid of all of the character toys and junky stuff from my childrens playthings, but I haven't been that severe. Its a process, and I think my kids would respond better to a gradual transistion, rather than a cold turkey approach.

So far, for my son, we've allowed him (well, my HUSBAND) allowed him to watch the first star Wars- the original one. I've told him that he is too young for the others, and he was pretty disturbed even on that one when a guy gets his head cut off or something. His friends have seen a ton of the others, including the cartoon one, and he knows that he's too young. When he wants to draw Star Wars, I try to talk with him about the scenes he's drawing, to keep him from focusing on the violent parts. If he's drawing the death star, for instance, I ask him about the other planets around it, what kind of solar system does he think the death star exists in, can he draw some of the other planets, can he draw some of the creatures or plantlife on that other planet, etc, and sort of carry the conversation away from the "movie" aspects. If he is drawing some of the guys fighting, I ask where are they fighting, then talk about their environment, and have him imagine what else is going on in that land, etc. For me, this has really helped a lot because instead of him just rattling off a list of character toys that he wants to "get" from Toys R Us, he seems to get more into the fantasy part... for his birthday, he wanted a Star Wars party. Instead, we've agreed to have a Space themed party, with lots of stars and planets and an alien cake, etc. He's really excited and doesn't even care that its not "Star Wars"...
 

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Sigh. Star Wars got in the way of my teaching all last year. I liked the movies too but hearing about them ALL DAY LONG?? It was just too much. One student finally drew a turtle instead of a Jedi and his mom and I were soooo excited. I had other parents complain whose children did not watch TV and who now too were obsessed with Star Wars. Peer influence is big - even for four year olds. It really is so attractive to kids. There is something about it! Maybe it is the "fairy tale of our time"? Wooden lightsabers anyone?


Even so, I would try to redirect the energy to something else. Kids need balance as do we all and something that occupies their every waking thought just doesn't seem healthy to me.
 

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I am a huge star wars fan. I started off my marriage OK with the movies. My DH loves them, so I watched them again and this time I liked them. Fast forward to my kiddos ages 7,5,3,2 and they are ALL starwars fanatics. We don't buy into the whole 'starwars media' stuff that is avalible for purchase, but there are lots of good things about starwars.

MORALITY is big in StarWars- doing the right thing.
EQUALITY is big- there are all kinds of beings in star wars.
RESPECT for one's master and for all living things.

I would much rather see my kids play with a pretend lightsaber, something that they aren't going to find in real life than a gun. I would rather they play something that also teaches discipline, respect, responsiblity, honor, morality and a love for all of life than just guns and shoot em up.

We have turned StarWars into our homeschool. I have a son that's difficult to reach due to various reasons, and starwars is one outlet that he is alive in. He's learned to count by the number of light saber hits we've had as we play toghether. We have re-created some of the planets from the movies using simple science and an old aquarium.

I don't see StarWars as a bad thing. If your child was so into trains wouldn't you embrace that and learn as much as you can about trains? Wouldn't your child talk non stop about trains? It's the nature of their age and I think the more we fight them the more they embrace it. The more they WANT to know about it. There are also thouisands of star wars books out there for them to read- you don't have to watch the movies!

Just my very biased opinion! Hope you all have a wonderfull day! May the force be with you!
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by yarngoddess View Post
I am a huge star wars fan. I started off my marriage OK with the movies. My DH loves them, so I watched them again and this time I liked them. Fast forward to my kiddos ages 7,5,3,2 and they are ALL starwars fanatics. We don't buy into the whole 'starwars media' stuff that is avalible for purchase, but there are lots of good things about starwars.

MORALITY is big in StarWars- doing the right thing.
EQUALITY is big- there are all kinds of beings in star wars.
RESPECT for one's master and for all living things.

I would much rather see my kids play with a pretend lightsaber, something that they aren't going to find in real life than a gun. I would rather they play something that also teaches discipline, respect, responsiblity, honor, morality and a love for all of life than just guns and shoot em up.

We have turned StarWars into our homeschool. I have a son that's difficult to reach due to various reasons, and starwars is one outlet that he is alive in. He's learned to count by the number of light saber hits we've had as we play toghether. We have re-created some of the planets from the movies using simple science and an old aquarium.

I don't see StarWars as a bad thing. If your child was so into trains wouldn't you embrace that and learn as much as you can about trains? Wouldn't your child talk non stop about trains? It's the nature of their age and I think the more we fight them the more they embrace it. The more they WANT to know about it. There are also thouisands of star wars books out there for them to read- you don't have to watch the movies!

Just my very biased opinion! Hope you all have a wonderfull day! May the force be with you!
That sounds wonderful that you are able to incorporate Star Wars in a way that breaks through to your child's education. I really think that is fantastic.

I agree that Star Wars deals with a lot of moral issues which is fine. It just becomes a slippery slope as far as I'm concerned because even though yes, there are books, then they've gotta have the toys, then the cereal with characters on it....and you know how smart kids are. I know with DS that if I let him have Star Wars Legos for instance (which he has been begging for now that his classmates have them) then he will want something else Star Wars related...and if I tell him no about that, he'll argue why was he allowed the Legos, and now why can't he play the video games, watch the newer violent movies...etc. So I sort of have to not get any of it or before I know it his whole room will be a Star Wars haven.

That is part of why we got rid of our tv. An all or nothing approach seems to work best in our home or else the media stuff just slides back in.
 

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I loved what the last two posters wrote about the good elements in star wars...however...

My understanding of Waldorf/Steiner's approach and warriness of the film media is this:
They are stories painted by someone elses imagination.
There is NOTHING inherintly wrong with that, violent or not. The idea is that since the main mission for a Waldorf-raised child is to nurture the imagination and protect the spirit/soul as much as possible, the more of other people's creative visions they see on a DEEP impact level such as film, the less time and energy they have to create their own.

Something like Star Wars (of which I am a huge fan as is my huge nerd/sci-fi husband) is brilliant! THe story has a classic hero cycle, it can be a great vehicle for teaching how our choices bring us to where we are and that our destiny may not come easily and so forth. BUT...both my dh and I agree that we don't think our children should see it before age 9 or 10 because it makes such STRONG an impact...and those messages can get overshadowed by the pretty pictures.

Perhaps...if your little one's at age 6 or 8 are interested in these stories, but have not seen the films yet...you could TELL them the story over a period of time! Write an appropriate version of the story, with the battles even, but their own imagination will construct the battle THEY can handle...nothing more. I was HORRIFIED that my uncle allowed my 7 year old (at the time) cousin to see "Revenge of the Sith". The images were difficult for me to watch, let alone a small child viewing a man being burned alive after slaughtering children! It is no surprise to me that my little cousin "play fights" more violently than I would EVER be comfortable with and that aggression being encouraged worries me.

Anyway...It's a hard call at times, but as much as want to share these things with our children now...we might need to wait longer than we anticipated.
 
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