Mothering Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking to have a bit more 'loose' structure to my day, because I think I am a lazy mum and if I plan things to do I am more likely to get them done than if I fly by the seat of my pants. I will also feel better at the end of the day knowing I have done stuff with my kids.<br><br>
This doesn't mean I am going to drag my dd away from her games, but just have ideas. I have found previously the things we have done seem to have little meaning (we did start on number properties) but if I ask dd about it, she won't remember because it has been too scarce and flitting from one thing to another, with no real links between anything we have done.<br><br>
I want to cover the basic areas of numeracy, literacy, science and throw in some French (we are going to go on holiday there this year) history/geography, arts etc. Maybe do some projects- notebooking/lapbooks.<br><br>
But there are so many different things to cover- how do you know where to start????? I know you should follow your own child's interests and I am in that we are doing a topic on Mulan/China at present.<br><br>
Do I just choose anything I think she will enjoy? If I choose an area to study- how long should we study it for? Days? A term? Is it better to say study for eg a History topic every day for 2 weeks so the child can become immersed in it, or is it better to do it a day or two each week and have other things as well?<br><br>
How do you narrow a topic down and know how to present it to your child???<br><br>
Sinking here with this stress <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">:<br><br>
Any starter tips?<br>
Thanks mammas xxxx
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43,705 Posts
I think it's best to follow the child's interests, as far as how long to study something. It certainly can't hurt to have some ideas and materials available available for her to choose from, but I'm not personally a big fan of setting up formal curriculums and using them religiously.<br><br>
Maybe get some books or videos about France/in French? Label everything in the house in French? We've done that with Hebrew here- the table, the window, the wall, etc, are all labeled with both English and Hebrew words for the things.<br><br>
I don't think kids need to be able to parrot back everything they've learned. What makes you think that kids in school can do that? Just because she can't parrot it back doesnt' mean she hasn't learned anything or benefitted from the lessons!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,914 Posts
If we are 'doing' a topic I start by gathering resources ( library books, dvds, music, manipulatives), checking out potential field trips, putting together a list of activities that my kids would find fun, finding out if anyone we know is an expert - that kind of thing. Then I start putting the resources into 'play' at our house. A poster or map goes up on the wall, Friday night movie might be related to the topic, bedtime stories on that topic start showing up etc.<br><br>
As for things like math - we just let that be part of our everyday. I read math books to the kids, we play games, watch math videos/dvds, play with manipulatives etc. With my older child we work on math and writing every day.<br><br>
hth<br>
Karen
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,397 Posts
You could ask her what she wants to learn in the from of a KWL.<br><br>
KWL<br>
What do I <b>know</b>?<br>
What do I <b>Want</b> to Know?<br>
What have I <b>learned</b>?<br><br>
Literacy, math, science etc will all fit into this category.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
456 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>brendon</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7340147"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">KWL<br>
What do I <b>know</b>?<br>
What do I <b>Want</b> to Know?<br>
What have I <b>learned</b>?</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Even if you are wanting to introduce regularity and structure, this can be a great interplay - you can start with assessing what she needs, then talk to her about the ideas you have and ask her to contribute more.<br><br>
Follow her interests - as you mentioned Mulan, well, even if you feel she needs some math, it can be Mulan-based math stories, and you can help guide her while at the same time empowering her to seek out her interests both within the loose structure and in the free time outside of it.<br><br>
I like all of the ideas presented above. Keep her at the center, then just help her to follow up - like you're her support network, and also her guide. Don't be afraid to say, ok, now lets add in some science, or art, or whatever on the theme she has chosen. Expanding can help her to find new interests.<br><br>
Keep structure short at first - maybe plan a week-long unit. Then you can lengthen it if she wants to. When you are used to no structure, it's a good idea to transition slowly.<br><br>
There are some great stories of China in two books I just had to mention, the Chi Lin Purse and Lao, Lao of Dragon Mountain (which has a paper cutting/folding activity in the back), also check out some general books on China.<br><br>
If she likes arts and crafts, go to the library for a book of Chinese crafts: Paint a silk, or lean a few Chinese characters, or about the Great Wall, or the matchmaking traditions - what's she interested in?<br><br>
To avoid getting overwhelmed, I would caution against going too broad with China. Choose a time period or part of the culture that she's interested in, and then concentrate there - otherwise China can overwhelm you (so can Greece). Here's a page with some Mulan links to give you ideas if you need them:<br><a href="http://www.heroinesinhistory.com/links.html" target="_blank">http://www.heroinesinhistory.com/links.html</a><br><br>
My eldest son loves China and even studied Chinese for over a year. He seems to relate to their culture, so we work a short China unit in each year.<br><br>
Best wishes,<br><br>
Lucie
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top