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Discussion Starter #1
<p>My plan for vaccinating my twins who will be born this summer is to give the first dose of every vaccine alone, and then proceed on schedule. I would like the first doses to be separated so that we can be sure which vaccination causes a reaction, if any happens. </p>
<p>I would separate the vaccines by a week or so, in that way not actually deviating from the schedule. Is there any reason why that is not a good idea? </p>
 

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<p>For the most part it is a fine idea.  I personally didn't do it that way, but that does't mean it isn't the right way.  The only caveat I would have is to find a place to get vaccines that doesn't mix people in waiting rooms.  The only potential problem I see with this idea is that if you go to a doctor's office that mixes well and sick visits you are increasing the exposure to non VPDs  in a very young infant.  But if you go to a well child immunization clinic or an office that separates well versus sick visits it should be fine.</p>
 

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<p>Have you spoken with your doctor about your concerns?  Keep in mind that the risk of a serious adverse reaction is incredibly small.  I think it would very difficult if not impossible to stay on the recommended schedule by giving the first dose alone (and you may not even be able to get a single dose vaccine of some of them). </p>
 

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<p>Since it's only been a few months, I'm curious about whether you went forward with this plan and how it is going.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>From what I understand, there are better ways to know which vaccine most likely causes a reaction. Different vaccines have different common reactions, and also the reactions each have a window of time in which they are known to occur after certain vaccines. If you keep a journal noting any possible reactions and how soon after the shots, you can probably pinpoint the vaccine or component that was responsible that way. If you want to know possible reactivity to future shots, it's  not really a reliable method to spread them out, because some shots also have reactions associated more with the specific sequence of a series. For example, DTaP is not usually very reactive for the first 3 doses, but can cause more significant swelling for doses 4 and 5. Having spread out the earlier doses isn't going to give you much insight about whether or not these 4th/5th dose reactions are more likely to occur. MMR and Varicella are the opposite, the first dose is usually more reactive, but if your child reacts (e.g. with fever or rash, not an allergic response) then it's much less likely that the second dose will cause a reaction, should you choose to get the second dose.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Also, when you get to MMR and Varicella, if you're choosing to have both of those, they have to be spaced at least 4 weeks apart if they are not given at the same time.</p>
 

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Discussion Starter #5
<p>The twins aren't set to arrive for another month or so, so I still have quite some time to think over the plan. </p>
 

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Best of luck with the end of your pregnancy. <img alt="smile.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/smile.gif">
 
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