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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<p>Okay, folks, what do I do with them?  </p>
<p> </p>
<p>Apart from not touch them as I put them in the compost ;)</p>
 

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<p>I think you can add them to soup and cook them like any other green. They're very nutritious!</p>
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<p>If I had a bunch of nettles, though, I'd tincture them or infuse them--nettles are great for seasonal allergy sufferers.</p>
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
<p>How do I tincture or infuse?  </p>
 

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<p>I just made nettle soup last night for dinner, using the nettles that sprouted up in our garden. The soup was okay, but I would definitely tweak the recipe I used. I found both the texture and the flavour were lacking a little. I boiled the chopped nettles in chicken stock, then pureed it, along with some fresh chives from the garden. I think I might use potato to thicken it, if I made it again. </p>
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<p>I searched for other soup recipes yesterday, because I know we'll have more nettles in a week or so, and I'd like to find something a little tastier. I found <a href="http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2012/mar/30/nettle-recipes-hugh-fearnley-whittingstall" target="_blank">these recipes</a> and might try some of them. </p>
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
<p>Thanks!</p>
 

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<p>I like them in soup, usually with the addiiton of stock, spinach, potato, and lemon. Some nice olive oil to finish.</p>
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<p>BUt wear gloves, they really do sting.</p>
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<p>I've also had them prepared at a restaurant in the same manner as spinach-ricotta gnoochi with a brown butter and sage sauce.</p>
 

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<p>I love them in a potato leek soup.</p>
<p>Stir fry.</p>
<p>My mom made an amazing nettle pie (like spinach pie) this spring.</p>
<p>Anywhere you use spinach or other cooked greens.  They taste great, and similar to spinach but with a rougher texture.</p>
<p>They're awesome in lasagna.</p>
<p>If you eat eggs, they're great in egg dishes as well.</p>
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<p>Oh, and to make a tincture, chop up the herb, put it in a jar, cover with alcohol (I like brandy for tinctures), shake it a couple times a day, strain some into a dropper bottle and use as desired.</p>
<p>You can make a tea (infusion) by pouring very hot water over the herb and letting it rest covered for 15 minutes.  You can keep it in your fridge for 4-5 days and drink it daily for allergies.  Nettles are very high in minerals, and the tea is wonderful for all kinds of stuff.</p>
 
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