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I always thoght to make stocks, you need raw bones.<br><br>
I recently came across a recipe calling for cleand bones that had already been cooked (chicken roast or whatever).<br><br>
Can stocks be made with cooked bones? Can I use all the bones after roasting a chicken, or do you think they've been cooked "too long" if I have them in a crockpot for 6-8 hours?<br><br>
I'm also looking for your favorite chicken or beef broth and stock recipes - and what do you do with your meats after you've made broths? I normally go ahead and use the chicken in soup but am looking for other ideas.
 

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You can make stock from cooked carcasses, but IMO, it's not nearly as good. I've found that the best stock comes from a mixture of meat and bones. My butcher sells chicken carcasses cheap, so I use those along with a boiling chicken--lets me stretch one boiler further.<br><br>
Best ever chicken soup (authentic Jewish housewife speaking <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> ) is to make a stock base using the carcasses and one batch of soup veg (onion, carrot, celery, parsley root or celery root): bring to a fast simmer, skim, turn heat down and simmer 90 mins, then remove, add the boiler and a fresh batch of veg (plus another 5 carrots, peeled, to eat with the soup), simmer another couple of hours, add big handful flat leaf parsley and (if you like, to me it's essential) a handful of dill and simmer another hour. Oh, the onion in the first batch should be unpeeled, to deepen the colour, but peel the 2nd or it goes too brown.<br><br>
The pullets I got in the States were usually just about usable for shredding and eating in the soup, but the boilers here are so tough that even after being cooked all afternoon you can't shred them.<br><br>
For beef I use bones with meat on (whatever the butcher has packed for soup bones) and a piece of shin.<br><br>
For brown beef stock I brown the onion, carrot, bones and meat in a hot oven, put in the stock pan, deglaze the roasting tin and add to the stock pot, add celery and herbs (parsley, bay leaf, unpeeled garlic clove, 2 cloves, sprig of thyme), pinch of salt. The beef isn't worth eating after being simmered for hours, so i bin it. Not the cheapest way to make stock, but the only way if you're using it for, say, French onion soup. If I'm making stock to use in bits for cooking I'll try to find whatever bits are going cheap--the tougher and more gelatinous, the better!
 

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To get good color in your stock from bones, it is recommended to roast the bones until they color. That color will effect both the flavor and color of the finished stock.<br><br>
So yes, definitely possible to use cooked carcass. Have you ever heard of Thanksgiving carcass soup? That's the soup made the week after thanksgiving with the leftover carcass of the turkey (I'm sure it has many names).
 
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