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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everybody,<br><br>
I have just stopped breastfeeding my two year old son, and I am not sure whether I should give him milk or any other dairy products now. My husband is completely against the idea (says cow's milk is for baby cows not for humans anyway) but I'm not sure. Ok, maybe not cow's milk, but what about other dairy products? Yoghurt?<br><br>
My baby eats all manner of fruit and veg, whole rice and pasta, pulses, nuts, etc. He doesn't eat meat and has had a bit of fish a few times only (we're trying to decide on this one - with the current pollution levels in our oceans, eating fish does not seem such a good idea anymore...).<br><br>
Thanks in advance for all your help and comments,<br><br>
M.
 

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Sounds like your child is eating very healthy <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br><br>
I think the most nutritious dairy products are (in this order): kefir, cultured sweet cream butter, raw hard cheeses, organic yogurt, and organic soft cheeses & creams. I think when it comes to dairy raw and organic is best but it can be hard to find. Anything that is 'cultured' is good. If you can't find raw milk I'd suggest using rice milk (Westsoy brand). I'm sure you can find some high quality organic dairy products at your local health food store or co-op. If you don't give your child meat and very little dairy you're going to have to get him to eat alot of eggs to get certain nutrients in him. And be sure to use lots of flax seeds/oil for his omega 3s, much less smelly and polluted than fish. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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My ds did not have dairy with exception of yogurt, until he was 3. he started eating yogurt at 2 1/2. Both dh and I have food allergies, and we were informed that it is better to wait to introduce allergic foods if there is a history. he still does not drink milk from cows because he prefers soy milk. There are different types of nondairy milks (soy, rice, almond, potato), I would recommend finding one that contains the vitamins and nutrients you want while also tasting good to your dc. You can also do cow's milk if you and your dp are ok with it because I think 1 is the average most babies start some dairy. Do introduce to much at once- go slow.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mz_libbie22</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">If you don't give your child meat and very little dairy you're going to have to get him to eat alot of eggs to get certain nutrients in him.</div>
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Out of curiosity, which nutrients are you referring to that cannot be gotten from non-animal sources? My children have never had eggs, very limited dairy & no meat. They aren't lacking any nutrients that I am aware of - I've researched it pretty well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
OP here - just wanted to add that there is no history of allergies in our families, it's just that we're not sure about dairy products, that's all...<br>
I just wanted to know if he actually needs to have it, as a growing toddler. He likes oat milk, and other nut/seed milks, but they cannot be considered "substitutes" for dairy, as they are not dairy, right? (or wrong?).<br>
He does have eggs, about one a week.<br><br>
thanks again!<br><br>
M.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>ChristaN</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Out of curiosity, which nutrients are you referring to that cannot be gotten from non-animal sources? My children have never had eggs, very limited dairy & no meat. They aren't lacking any nutrients that I am aware of - I've researched it pretty well.</div>
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B12 for one. You could rely on supplements but, I chose not to do that with my formerly vegan son and started him back on eggs and dairy recently, I don't believe in giving kids pills for something they should be getting naturally (plus he wouldn't take a vitamin everday even if I wanted him to). I also didn't like him relying on fortified drinks/food for his B12. It just seemed totally unnatural to me. From my experience animal products were a very necessary part of his diet, he immediately lost weight when he was taken off of them six months ago. I tried everything to get his weight back up but nothing worked. I also thought that he would get everything he needed from vegan food but, after going beyond the pro-vegan websites for information I realized that that's just not possible.<br><br>
I know that this is strange since I'm a vegetarian but, I do think that Price was right about the importance of good quality animal products. I'm starting to follow alot of the advice from the Weston Price site (it's actually very similar to veg/raw foodist principles) and I am gonna buy his book and NT soon. Hopefully there are a few non-meat recipes in it<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mummy111</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">OP here - just wanted to add that there is no history of allergies in our families, it's just that we're not sure about dairy products, that's all...<br>
I just wanted to know if he actually needs to have it, as a growing toddler. He likes oat milk, and other nut/seed milks, but they cannot be considered "substitutes" for dairy, as they are not dairy, right? (or wrong?).<br>
He does have eggs, about one a week.<br><br>
thanks again!<br><br>
M.</div>
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The only dairy products my son is eating right now are kefir, butter, and raw cheese. A toddler only needs a few pieces of cheese a day to meet their calcium needs. No child needs to drink several glasses of milk of day to be healthy. It's best to get kids off of the sweet milk/juice beverages and get them used to drinking water.<br><br>
btw, right. Nut/seed milks do not have the same nutrional value as cow/goat milk.
 

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I have heard that dairy is one of the least adequate ways to get calcium and vitamins compared to its fruit and vegetable counterparts. Sea vegetables are extremely high in digestable digestable calcium and is not problematic with iron absorption like dairy, and even fortified tropicana is supposed to be a better calcium for healthy bones if combined with exercise. I think nutritional yeast is a good source of b12 and can be used similar to salt on foods to enrich. All things aside, I eat some dairy because I like the flavor and texture in some of my meals.<br>
OP- I was just trying to give you some background on why we did not introduce milk, but was not assuming you had allergies. I think you will have read from a variety of sources and compare the nutrients you are/ would be getting from all of the sources to see if they meet your needs.
 
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