Mothering Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,705 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you store diapers and covers, like in a garage/attic/closet, do you put something in them to keep the moths away? I would have NEVER dreamed we'd have a problem with moths (I imagine the fluttering kind/size you see by the lights), but Dh's suit (one and ONLY suit) got moth-eaten in our closet! I can't let that happen to precious diapers (who cares about the suit, right? You can BUY another one of those... :LOL). Everything gets stored in rubbermaid around here, but for diapers I was thinking of lining it with unbleached muslin, first.<br><br>
Thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,839 Posts
I'd like to know this, too. After ds is out of dipes, I'd like to save a cover or two for possible grandchildren. That would be a long time in storage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,427 Posts
I have been wondering about moths too. Like can they attack the wool covers we are currently using? What do the kind that eat wool look like? And where do they come from? Like we have moths in our house that get in from outside but I always assumed they are not the bad kind.<br><br>
Melaniee , for storage I would think a rubbermaide container would be enough. They couldn't possibly get through that could they?<br><br>
I think I better hit the internet for some moth research because if they wrecked my RB's I would just die.<br><br>
eta I just read some articles about clothes moths and they weren't much help. They basically said to wash the clothes before storing and that the key is prevention. But because the months like the dark (ie stored items) the infestation is usually not caught until it is too late.<br><br>
So I have some size 2 RB's stored in a dresser drawer waiting for ds to grow into them and I am very worried. I am terrified of bugs in general and after reading the articles about the moth larva eating the wool I am going to be sick. So I found this <a href="http://www.drugstore.com/qxp82222_332828_idif/springstar/clothes_moth_alarm.htm" target="_blank">moth alarm</a> and I think I am going to have to boobie trap the dresser drawer.<br><br>
Anyone else feeling a little paranoid about their wool or am I being crazy again?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,733 Posts
I found moths on a thrift store sweater I brought home and now I am UBER paranoid about them. It was in my closet with ALL my good woolen sweaters, and I had to toss a couple <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/mecry.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="crying">. I have always had a moth 'thing'...and so when i found them I went on an all-out moth-busting rampage! I also found a bunch in our storage room, in my maternity clothes and in dd's stored baby stuff. Seems they don't just like wool. They were on cotton, corduroy, and on some polar fleece things too. bleh.<br><br>
They are beige, pretty tiny, and they don't fly around much. they just kind of flutter a bit if you disturb them, but don't FLY much. Their larvae eat the sweaters. look for tiny little silk trails. looks kinda like regular swetaer fluff but they disappear when you roll them with your fingertip.<br><br>
I wash all thrift stuff on HOT now when it comes through my door. *shudder*<br><br>
to protect my wool fabric, I crush lavender flowers by hand between all pieces of fabric. i also put lavender & eucalyptus sachets in between stacks of fabric. it's kinda messy but no moths! *knocking on wood* They also don't like cedar. you can buy aromatic cedar and place it in the rubbermaid with the woolens. Eucalyptus or cedar oils are a little too strong smelling for me to use on fabric for the business, as I am uncertain of allergies and sensitivities, but lavender is a common moth replellent. (that's why Eucalan uses eucalyptus and lavender).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,427 Posts
Thanks for the tips Kendall. My room is going to clear the nasal passages when I get done with it.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
So where do the moths come from? Do they have to be brought in from an outside source?<br><br>
I was trying to find info about where clothes moths are more commen, like certain parts of the country. But couldn't find that anywhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,016 Posts
Thanks Kendell for pointing out that it is the larvae and not the actual 'adult' moths that cause damage to our wooly what-nots! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Just say 'no' to Rubbermaid: Due to a lack of air circulation within plastic containers or bags, it is not a choice environment for long-term storage of any textile. Any moisture that is 'captured' in the container will cause a musty smell and possible mold and mildew damage. It is recommended that to protect your wool covers from mold, mildew and moth larvae, try storing them in cedar wood, wicker baskets with cedar chips, cotton bags or any other type of container that will allow the textile to breathe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,705 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Kendall.<br><br>
Heather, I'm bug and rodent paranoid about storing stuff in non-rubbermaid. A friend stored her wedding dress in a plastic zip-bag, and a year later it had moisture stains, though. That's my though on the muslin, maybe it will absorb the moisture?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,016 Posts
You know - I don't know . . . but I'll look into it and see if I can't find an answer for ya! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
752 Posts
as wool is a natural fiber and really should breath. For long term storage I would get some acid free packing papers (some are also treated for moth repellant) and pack in an acid free box with some lavender buds and some ceder balls or some eucalyptus. Just be sure none of the botanicals or balls are touching fabrics cause in time they may leave some marks on the fabric.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,016 Posts
All of me says rubbermaid isn't a good idea - I know people were able to effectively store wool items through the ages before the introduction of non-breathable/permeable plastics.<br><br>
My quilt fabrics are all in cardboard boxes and the edges are all sealed with packing tape - but I'm still checking out about that muslin absorbing moisture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,016 Posts
Okay, found some information regarding plastics. Apparently, the biggest concern is that, as we know, fabric needs to breathe. Storing wool (or any fabric for that matter) in vinyl/plastic airtight containers will cause fiber deterioration from chemical interaction and that same plastic will impart an odor to the wool over a period of time (especially if we are talking long-term storage).<br><br>
So, what is suggested. Well, acid-free products (of course). Also, sturdy linen stationary boxes - you should ask at a local print shop (they usually have tons).<br><br>
What is warned against (and I had never considered this) - CARDBOARD SHOE BOXES. We aren't talking regular cardboard, but those cheap, think cardboard gift and shoe boxes. Why? They are produced from un'friendly' products (leftovers). But, if it is all you have, you can get some acid-free tissue so that NONE of your wool will come into contact with the actual cardboard.<br><br>
If cedar chests are a bit pricey (yep, they are), you can wrap your wool in tissue first, then in newspaper! Get this: MOTHS HATE NEWSPAPER! Store in a dresser, cabinet, closet, but not with moth balls and away from direct sunlight, damp basements, hot attics and/or garages.<br><br>
You can learn a heck of a lot about fabrics of all sorts online through simple searches, but I particularly like the organization at Fabrics.net. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,705 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
:LOL Cedar Chest - I have one! I don't know why I didn't think of that!? Probably b/c it's full of dolls and newspapers.<br><br>
Thanks Heather.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,282 Posts
For those who really, really want to use Rubbermaid containers but worry about moisture - would a little silica gel work? I imagine that some people might object to it because it's not a natural substance, but I just thought I might throw it out there.<br><br>
Oh, and silica gel is reusable - you just dry it out in the microwave or the conventional oven. I wonder if you could try drying out those little packs that come with new shoes and then just tuck them in the container with the diapers?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,043 Posts
Also, for those of you that don't have cedar chests, you can just get balls of aromatic cedar to store with your wool and it will keep the moths away.<br>
Luckily, I have grandma's chest, complete with 3 (well, 4 now) wedding dresses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,311 Posts
Wow, I never knew that about plastic containers.<br>
I am going to have to unpack all of my cherishables next weekend, and repack them in cardboard boxes.<br><br>
As for wool, Eucalan claims to keep moths away, I wonder if a good dousing with that would help.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top