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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
anyone has them? is a 5.5 year old too young for something similar? any thoughts on how to make them yoursel, so they are more age appropriate?
 

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Are you just asking about the cards with pictures on them that you make up stories using them as prompts? If so, yes- we have them and 5 is a great age. I don't want to write too much if I'm thinking of something else, but if I'm on the right track I'll share more.
 

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I'm not sure exactly what you mean. There is a wonderful card game called <a href="http://www.wunderland.com/LooneyLabs/Nanofictionary/About.html" target="_blank">Nanofictionary</a> in which players tell stories based on the cards in their hands. It's labeled "age 10 and up" because the rules are complex, but I don't care for the rules; I just like the cards and the stories they inspire! I prefer just to give each player some cards, maybe do some swapping around, and then tell our stories. However, I've never tried to play with kids who can't read, and I think the cards wouldn't work as well just looking at the pictures without being able to read the captions. I mean, some of the character cards are "the alien disguised as a human" and "the time traveler visiting from 1888" and "the millionaire"--you cannot recognize these traits just looking at the pictures.<br><br>
But you totally could make your own set of cards for scrambling into stories! Nanofictionary has 4 types of story elements:<br>
Character<br>
Setting<br>
Problem<br>
Resolution<br>
You could make those types of cards (using different colors of stiff paper), draw pictures or use pictures from magazines, and write brief captions (to encourage reading, but they wouldn't be necessary to understanding the cards). Characters obviously would be various types of people and animals. Settings would be places. Problems would be pictures of things going wrong: spilling something, arguing, skinned knee, too many things to carry, feeling sick, etc. Resolutions would be pictures of things that happen at the end: cleaning up, hugging, going home, winning a trophy, etc. (I'm finding it hard to think of resolutions that can be expressed in pictures, off the top of my head. Look at the last page of books for inspiration.)<br><br>
One thing I've learned playing Nanofictionary is that you have to take your Characters and imagine them in place of whatever people are depicted on your other cards, because when you mix up the cards you don't see the same people on all the cards throughout your story. For example, if you have the Character "the guy in the apartment upstairs" and the Resolution "she decided to stay", you may tell a story about how HE decided to stay.<br><br>
I hope this is helpful and not totally out of left field because you had something completely different in mind. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>julieshayna</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9866501"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Are you just asking about the cards with pictures on them that you make up stories using them as prompts? If so, yes- we have them and 5 is a great age. I don't want to write too much if I'm thinking of something else, but if I'm on the right track I'll share more.</div>
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yes, this is what i mean! sorry for not being specific. please share more if you can!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>EnviroBecca</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9866574"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm not sure exactly what you mean. There is a wonderful card game called <a href="http://www.wunderland.com/LooneyLabs/Nanofictionary/About.html" target="_blank">Nanofictionary</a> in which players tell stories based on the cards in their hands. It's labeled "age 10 and up" because the rules are complex, but I don't care for the rules; I just like the cards and the stories they inspire! I prefer just to give each player some cards, maybe do some swapping around, and then tell our stories. However, I've never tried to play with kids who can't read, and I think the cards wouldn't work as well just looking at the pictures without being able to read the captions. I mean, some of the character cards are "the alien disguised as a human" and "the time traveler visiting from 1888" and "the millionaire"--you cannot recognize these traits just looking at the pictures.<br><br>
But you totally could make your own set of cards for scrambling into stories! Nanofictionary has 4 types of story elements:<br>
Character<br>
Setting<br>
Problem<br>
Resolution<br>
You could make those types of cards (using different colors of stiff paper), draw pictures or use pictures from magazines, and write brief captions (to encourage reading, but they wouldn't be necessary to understanding the cards). Characters obviously would be various types of people and animals. Settings would be places. Problems would be pictures of things going wrong: spilling something, arguing, skinned knee, too many things to carry, feeling sick, etc. Resolutions would be pictures of things that happen at the end: cleaning up, hugging, going home, winning a trophy, etc. (I'm finding it hard to think of resolutions that can be expressed in pictures, off the top of my head. Look at the last page of books for inspiration.)<br><br>
One thing I've learned playing Nanofictionary is that you have to take your Characters and imagine them in place of whatever people are depicted on your other cards, because when you mix up the cards you don't see the same people on all the cards throughout your story. For example, if you have the Character "the guy in the apartment upstairs" and the Resolution "she decided to stay", you may tell a story about how HE decided to stay.<br><br>
I hope this is helpful and not totally out of left field because you had something completely different in mind. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"></div>
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this is wonderful! thank you for the inspiration and detailed descriptions. i'm totally going to make a set of cards like this for DD!!!
 

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the set that we have are very simple. they do not have any words on them but have pictures. some things that are pictured are an ice-cream cone, astronaut, shoe, house, sun, etc. really simple stuff. My DD has been using these to tell stories since kindergarten (5 years). Sometimes we play that she picks a card and tells a sentence to the story, then I pick and try to make up a sentence that connects, her turn to pick and add on, then mine and over and over. We come up with some crazy/silly stories that way. Other times we play that you pick a certain number of cards and tell a story using all the cards you picked. I can remember DD had a friend over one time in K and the other girl just didn't get it! She was a child raised on TV, fast food, left at home with no supervision other than 8 year old sister, etc. so she had other issues, but she just didn't enjoy the process or have fun making up the stories. But I think that 5 is totally an appropriate age if your DC is used to listening to stories either read or told and if you play with DC- at least at first. My younger one started trying to play with us at age 3- grant it, his stories didn't always make sense (AT ALL) but he was using his imagination and was working on his skills of being a story teller and a good communicator. I dont think you can start them on this too young if you use age appropriate cards (and if you make them than you know what your DC is capable of) and if you "play" with the child. Have fun!! This makes me want to get ours out and tell some stories!
 

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I've been browsing for new games and I saw this one, which sounds something like what you are describing: <a href="http://www.funagain.com/control/product?product_id=004374N" target="_blank">http://www.funagain.com/control/prod...uct_id=004374N</a><br><br>
It's called <i>Once Upon a Time</i> and has both a storytelling aspect and a group game element.<br><br>
I think my 5.5 yo DS would love it and it would be fun to play in a mixed age group.<br><br>
Juliette
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lurk.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lurk">:
 

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Family Pasttimes has a great game as one of four in its <a href="http://www.familypastimes.com/3%20to%207%20Years/earlyyears.html" target="_blank">Early Years</a> game. The game is called Story Time. It includes "obstacle" cards and "useful things" cards. You lay out a bunch of obstacle cards face down and deal out useful things cards and then, as a group you tell a story about a search for treasure (or to rescue a lost baby) turning over the obstacle cards one at a time and then imagining ways to overcome the obstacles using the useful things. My dd loved this game from about age 5 and still likes it.<br><br>
Another story telling game we have enjoyed is <a href="http://www.funagain.com/control/product/~product_id=016708" target="_blank">The Storybook Game</a> at Funagain Games. This is a memory game where you make up a story to help you remember a sequence of cards, but you certainly don't have to do the memory part - you could just turn the cards over one at a time and add them to your story. This game is rated ages 4 and up.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>jrcronewillis</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9870082"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I've been browsing for new games and I saw this one, which sounds something like what you are describing: <a href="http://www.funagain.com/control/product?product_id=004374N" target="_blank">http://www.funagain.com/control/prod...uct_id=004374N</a><br><br>
It's called <i>Once Upon a Time</i> and has both a storytelling aspect and a group game element.<br><br>
I think my 5.5 yo DS would love it and it would be fun to play in a mixed age group.<br><br>
Juliette</div>
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This one is fun. My 5.5 year old loves it, but it is one that works best in a multi-age setting.
 
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