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The other thread was too massive for me to enter.<br><br>
I'm a PhD student with a 21-month-old at an Ivy League school which, despite its very deep pockets, offers next to nothing to assist, or even acknowledge the existence of, student parents (other than, for those with babies and toddlers, semi-useless social events like Halloween parties). However, I am meeting with a dean & various people involved with student affairs to try to change that soon.<br><br>
I wanted to know: What does your college/university offer student parents? Is there free or cheap day care available? Child care scholarships? Housing help? Does your school pay for your kid's health insurance?<br><br>
If your school offers little or nothing, what do you need? How could your school make it easier to be a parent?<br><br>
This will help me organize my argument, and compare my university to others. Thank you!!
 

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I'm a grad student with a 17mo at a state university (so no deep pockets). Still, they do offer some recognition of student parents. As part of an RA or TA, we get health insurance which can cover spouse and/or dependents for a not unreasonable premium.<br><br>
There is student housing available for married couples, same sex couples, or students with children. When I arrived here they offered these units at a subsidized rent, which is great, but the waiting list was a year or two long. THey have since built more units, but they are no longer subsidized, and are now open to any student/faculty/staff who can afford to live there.<br><br>
There is child care on campus, but it is essentially unreachable. The wait list is too long! (One guy received a phone call about a slot open in the infant room - for his now 3 year old.) You have to sign your child up well before you even consider conceiving him/her. And it's too expensive and not flexible at all! A full-time slot for an infant is $1000. There are part-time options, but they are things like 5 half days for $600 (as opposed to drop in hours for people in classes, etc.). There are some subsidies available (up to about half the cost) for low-income students.<br><br>
So, yes, student parents exist here, and the school recognizes it, but I don't think they recognize that their system isn't set up quite right. Health insurance - great! Housing - going in the wrong direction, with fancy expensive units. Child Care - I would really like something cheaper and more flexible - allowing for students who are taking classes to have care for a few hours here and there.<br><br>
Good luck with your meeting.
 

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I am law school evening student with a 16 month old. We get nothing. (well, we do have a lactation room, so I guess that counts)<br><br>
Part of the reason is that the law school and the undergraduate school it is affilaited with are on two different campuses. I visited another law school down the road where the undergrads are on campus and they had a cooperative daycare program. From what Ive heard it seems to work.<br><br>
Daycare is the overarching need for me.<br><br>
But some smaller things have really helped me, like profs who are willing to answer questions by email and having old exams on the web. The more I can do from home or in the off hours, the easier life is. Even the cafeteria offering meals to go has helped me out.<br><br>
It seems that these kinds of things would be easier to get off the ground than a day care center.<br><br>
BTW:<br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/Welcome.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="welcome">
 

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Hi--I'm a dissertating PhD student away from my home campus (lg public university in CA) and writing at the campus where my husband teaches in the midwest. We have daycare, which is very expensive, but the quality of care is exceptional with a 1:2 ratio until 12 mos, and a 1:3 ratio until 2yo. Students receive a discount and have priority for admitting their children over faculty and alumni because the mandate of the center is that at least 50% must be student's children. Most parents are very happy with our daycare, and I could give you more information if interested. Just pm me and good luck!
 

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I'm a law student at a big midwestern school, and we too get very, very little support. (Although we did finally get an old storage room converted into lactation/cry room space -- only because after having a couple of newborns come in for feedings and start screaming in the grand atrium where the whole school could hear, the administration got 'motivated'.)<br><br>
*If* you have a fellowship or a TA position, you are eligable for university benefits, which offer good coverage for a very small premium (we pay $26/a month for family benefits), but these positions are generally not available to law students.<br><br>
Day Care at our campus is absurdly expensive compared to the going rate of private child care in town and the subsidies that are offered are very small. Day care for a toddler is $260/week and subsidies are $100/month, and are shared out among the entire campus, graduate and undergraduate so there are a couple hundred subsidies for several thousand student parents, and since undergrads are poorer, most grad students don't qualify. Luckily, there is some state day care assistence availible if you work in addition to going to school. Also, the campus day care is extremely inconviently located, off on the back arse of beyond -- convienent to graduate student housing, but not anything else, and does not do anything but full time or a very few half time spots.<br><br>
Graduate student housing is available, but I don't know anyone who actually lives there. Mainly, that's because it's expensive and not convienent to anything other than the university, and we're having a housing glut, so housing is pretty cheap outside of the University. But we have it, and it's actually pretty nice.
 

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I'm at NYU Law School. It totally sucks for parents, we might as well not exist (I'm sure they would prefer we didn't). That's not just the law school, it's all the NYU schools.<br><br>
No child care at all. There is a $200/semester subsidy, which is a joke (that covers about 1 week for me). They offer a free child care referral service; however all 3 times so far that I"ve had to find child care I've foudn the service to be a huge hassle and I've gotten my referrals thru word of mouth. Grad housing is available, but we're talking Lower Manhattan, so insanely expensive - I'm way better off doing my own housing in Queens. Health insurance is available, but while the price for the principal is quite reasonable, the price to add a dependent is just outrageous. I managed to get my ds on Medicaid, but I had to spend uncountable hours on the phone arguing with bureacrats to do it.<br><br>
Fortunately, someone in the Financial Services office loves my ds <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"> so she has really gone the extra mile for us. This is on her own initiative, I don't feel like the institution supports me at all, but she does. So she has managed to hook up a special loan for me to cover child care expenses, which is zero interest for the life of the loan, and payment won't start till 5 yrs after graduation. So that's nice.<br><br>
So in conclusion, please do NOT hold up NYU as an example. I have heard that Yale Law School is pretty good, tho I don't know any details. Might want to check them out. Also a friend of mine used to work at the daycare at Berkely? Or was it Stanford? She loved it there, it was co-op-ish, the parents were very involved. Might want to look at that.
 

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I'm a grad student at a large urban public university. We get childcare subsidies if we qualify financially. There is also on-site childcare with a wait-list but priority for students. I have a TA appointment, which pays exactly $60 less than the cost of monthly daycare without subsidies. With subsidies, I am left with less than half of my monthly stipend.<br><br>
I actually pulled my dd out of daycare because even with the subsidies, I am paying $450 a month, which is way more than I can afford.<br><br>
There is also university run housing for marrieds, same sexed partnered, and parents, but the housing is more expensive than other apartments in the area, so we don't live there.<br><br>
TA/Ras get health insurnace for free, and pay $100/month for dependents. If you're an undergrad or don't have appointment, you can purchase health coverage for yourself and your dependents for about $250/month for 2 people. I had this purchased health coverage when I had my dd, and paid over $5000 out of pocket for her c/s birth, because the health coverage is so minimal.<br><br>
I think FREE daycare for students would be a big help, as well as daycare that offers evening hours.<br><br>
LIke someone else said, it seems like the effort is there, but parent students are really very underserved here.
 

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wow i feel little. im a regular college kid.. 4 year college with a 3 month old and my college offers nothing! not even married student housing <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">
 

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i'm a ph.d. student at an urban university which offers little in the form of "formal" support for students with children...personally, i think the biggest factor is departmental culture...structural changes are nice and well-needed, but frankly, the climate of your particular department is likely to mean more in the here-and-now (which is of course when you need the change). my dd is 6mo and she's been with me to classes, teaching, meetings, and everyone in the department is used to seeing her around (and me bf'ing her everywhere) and it makes a WORLD of difference...there is no way i could have had the qua;lity of time with her that i have had if the departmental culture was not supportive of my mothering her in the way i do...btw, the department secretaries bought me a sling for my shower...that's how cool they all are!!!<br><br>
good luck and do post on what you find out
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>freegirl23cat</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">i'm a ph.d. student at an urban university which offers little in the form of "formal" support for students with children...personally, i think the biggest factor is departmental culture...structural changes are nice and well-needed, but frankly, the climate of your particular department is likely to mean more in the here-and-now (which is of course when you need the change). my dd is 6mo and she's been with me to classes, teaching, meetings, and everyone in the department is used to seeing her around (and me bf'ing her everywhere) and it makes a WORLD of difference...there is no way i could have had the qua;lity of time with her that i have had if the departmental culture was not supportive of my mothering her in the way i do...btw, the department secretaries bought me a sling for my shower...that's how cool they all are!!!<br><br>
good luck and do post on what you find out</div>
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i second this. i just bitched and complained about how unsupportive the *structure* is, and tis true, but the culture is both good and bad. thank god i took clinic, where i have been able to spend most of my time, and took the baby w/ me till he was 5 mo. that was a lifesaver. i still bring him in there when i have to, and the students and faculty and secretaries are so happy to see him, and often offer to hang out w/ him while i get stuff done. but if i had taken only regular classes instead of clinic i am sure i would have found the culture very unsupportive.
 

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We have an office to provide referral and assistance. Right now I recieve a subsidy called CCAMPIS (Child Care Access Means Parents In School), but the grant that pays for it ends after the spring and can't be renewed because the funding for it dried up.<br><br>
There is no on-campus childcare for under 2. DD is on the waiting list for the campus daycare that starts at 2 yo and because I put her on it at 1 yo birthday she should be able to get in the semester after she turns 2.<br><br>
There is also no child-friendly place to study on-campus. There is family housing, but it is out at East Campus and not substantially less expensive than renting an apartment close to Main.
 

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I was very disappointed to find that at one of the colleges I attended, you could only put your child in the daycare on campus, IF you enrolled in the class to <i>work</i> at the daycare (and NOT working with your own child(ren) even). Really, wtf? I had a packed schedule as it was. Working at the daycare did NOT fit into my degree program at all, and would only add more stress to my day, and time it would take to earn my degree.<br><br>
I honestly didn't even bother looking looking into campus daycare at the school I where I just finished my degree.
 

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hi im another measly undergrad feeling tiny<br><br>
we have nothing at my univerity either. i was suprised when reading your post when you were asking about it. i was like HUH they are supposed to give me extras??? they do have student family housing here that seems OK but we live off campus cuz they dont allow pets and we have 2 cats<br><br>
there is a daycare but it is just as hard to get into as above posters talked about<br><br>
what i wish for is extra flexability with large assignments. i am lucky cuz i have had really understanding profs , and have only had to ask once for an extension, but i would like it if it were my *right* as a parent. also, i hate it when professors assign out of class things where you have to go meet with a study group , or you MUST go to the library to get something special that wasnt on the syllybus, or when they require one-on-one meetings with you on a regular basis. these extra appointments are a HUGE hassle for me as a parent and i wish i could be exempt from them! the same goes for attendance policies. my attendance will obviously affect my grade and i wish i could just be treated like an adult and not have to worry about my 2 "allowed" absenses per semester! (as an addtional threat to my grade) ARG!<br><br>
again i have had understanding teachers, and have gotten out of some stuff, but i really wish there was a school policy so it didnt feel like i was getting special treatment under the table.
 

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Bumping up this thread.<br><br>
I am on my way out of school, but have started talking w/ some folks in student gvt who I hope will take on this fight in the coming year - something I never had time to do. I'm meeting w/ them this afternoon and would love to hear other examples of how it is at other schools. (Especially law schools.)
 

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I work at a private university, the same university where I got my Ph.D. When I first came in 1994 there was absolutely no childcare at all. Nothing. Zero. Zip. Then a group of grad students with kids started making a fuss. The grad student association started bugging the administration about it. Eventually the junior faculty members got on board, too. The Women's center was involved as well. Finally, a few years ago the administration started up a relationship with an existing childcare provider, giving our faculty and students priority over folks in the community. This year a second facility opened on our second campus. Grad students get a substantial discount; I'm not sure about undergrads.<br><br>
I'm saying this because I don't think the university would ever have voluntarily started up this service; the persistance of the grads paid off. So don't give up hope! I would also suggest getting junior faculty involved if you can. At our university, the administration is finally getting the picture that good childcare is a benefit that can make or break a decision to stay on and invest in the university, or take a better offer someplace else.
 

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I go to Nursing school at a community college, so I'm not sure how much I'm "entitled" to ask for from them. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"><br><br>
They have a daycare center, but only for children who have already done their potty learning. My DS is only 3 months old, so that's out for us. Really stinks too, because the caregivers seem so wonderful. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/crap.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="crap"> As for paying for health insurance? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/ROTFLMAO.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rotflmao"> Now THAT I know they don't do. Sure would be lovely though! I know from my sister that they do give you more loan money when you have DC to help with housing costs.<br><br>
Several of the bathrooms at our school have a small room with a couch just prior to entering the bathroom bathroom, which would be handy for breastfeeding if I was shy about it (though I'm not <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> ). I see a lot of Mamas bringing their DCs to class when necessary, but they are usually age 7 and older...it'd be nice if the school was more welcoming to babes coming to class. Can't think of anything else because I drank way too much coffee and my brain is only putting things together in little bits. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/upsidedown.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="upsidedown">
 

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What does your college/university offer student parents? Is there free or cheap day care available? Child care scholarships?<br>
No, No<br><br>
Housing help?<br>
No, married student housing or the like does not exist.<br><br>
Does your school pay for your kid's health insurance?<br>
No, but I can add my husband and my duaghter for 125 bucks a month. Which isn't super affordable given grad student salaries, but it is decent.<br><br>
I'm a 5th year phd student with a >2yr old (sorry i forget the months, exactly) and a baby on the way. I've asked the womens resource center here on campus to sponsor a student parent group. Nada. They do offer "a microwave + achair for pumping + a fridge to store milk in."<br><br>
What do I want?<br>
1. childcare help. there's a (new) daycare center on campus that isn't awfully expensive, nor is it super cheap. But I want students to (a) have priority and/or (b) get a discount and/or (c). get a discount for working there on a volunteer basis -- ok I want a coop.<br><br>
2. I'd also like a more private space for pumping.<br><br><br>
Personally I think it depends campus to campus and dept to dept. The "main u" i.e. University of Minnesota in the twin cities has a cooperative daycare center there and student housing for married students.<br><br>
Ways a campus CAN show support:<br>
1. not require seminar attendance for parents and/or make it OK for kids to come along to departmental seminars.<br><br>
2. offer a space for hanging out with your kids. frankly I can't take my kiddo to the library while I study with friends. I *could* study with my friends if they had a room available where the kids could play on the floor with each other, with a closed door so no one escaped.<br><br>
3. provide a spot for parents to get names, email, whatever of other parents interested in getting together for support. Be it a support group or simply a parents list where you could contact them at random.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>fuller2</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">What does your college/university offer student parents? Is there free or cheap day care available? Child care scholarships? Housing help? Does your school pay for your kid's health insurance?</div>
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ph.d. student also at a medium-sized private, east coast university - the university itself offers student parents nothing beyond what it offers every student. the day care on campus is clearly geared to faculty and staff, as it closes at 5:30, and the majority of classes (at least in the college of education) are either 4-7 or 7-10pm. the cost is in the same range as other daycares in the area.<br><br>
married student housing is available, but i am not sure how it compares to other rentals in the area (we own). the university subsidizes a percentage of our health insurance if we need it, but i do not think that the subsidy increases if you have others on your plan (i was only on their health plan one semester, while dh was laid off, and dd was on the state insurance for free).<br><br>
that said, my college is very flexible with hours for research and grad assistantship hours - and deadlines when one (don't know WHO THAT could be!!!) has a baby one month before the semester ends!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"><br><br>
AND the college that we share a building with renovated the women's bathroom on our floor to include a private pumping area when a large number of their faculty and students had little munchkins last year.<br><br>
bottom line - i feel very supported by the faculty and dean of my college, being a student parent, but see little from the university itself.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Ravin</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">There is also no child-friendly place to study on-campus. There is family housing, but it is out at East Campus and not substantially less expensive than renting an apartment close to Main.</div>
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Oh my god, now wouldn't that be a dream? I'd love it if they could take one of the storage or study rooms off the Library and put down carpet and tables and make it a parent-friendly study room. We had an area like this at the school that I did my undergrad at, where they even had TOYS, and kids books an old computer with learning games right in the library. I was co-parenting my goddaughter at the time, because her mom was having some problems and we went there to study all the time. Plus, they would let you have drinks and snacks in that room as long as you cleaned up after yourself. It was great.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">what i wish for is extra flexability with large assignments. i am lucky cuz i have had really understanding profs , and have only had to ask once for an extension, but i would like it if it were my *right* as a parent. also, i hate it when professors assign out of class things where you have to go meet with a study group , or you MUST go to the library to get something special that wasnt on the syllybus, or when they require one-on-one meetings with you on a regular basis. these extra appointments are a HUGE hassle for me as a parent and i wish i could be exempt from them! the same goes for attendance policies. my attendance will obviously affect my grade and i wish i could just be treated like an adult and not have to worry about my 2 "allowed" absenses per semester! (as an addtional threat to my grade) ARG!</td>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that">:<br><br>
At our university, undergraduate tests (like unit tests, and the like) are scheduled outside of class time during the evening, for some stupid reason. They have no way to change that around for parents who work, or anyone else who might have a family life or a conflict. Plus, the university is trying to encourage professors to assign more group projects and things that are just a MESS if you've got any other commitments outside of school. Luckily, attendance hasn't been an issue with law classes (Most law students don't go to class anyway after their second year, so if I miss one or two it's not a huge screaming deal) but my fellowship classes have been a *nightmare*. I actually had a (older, male) professor this semester who didn't understand why I wouldn't return to class the day after I gave birth! With my homework in hand!
 

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The languages department schedules finals in the evening like that. Luckily knowing about it far ahead of time lets DH take off work for it, and this semester it's on a monday which he has off anyway.<br><br>
As per my rant elsewhere on the board, the grants funding CCAMPIS subsidies have been cut, and also they are now limiting it to daycare directly affiliated with the campus. This comes down from Washington and is not the fault of the school. The director of the Child and Family Services Office is awesome and helpful. But because of the changes there are exactly 9 childcare slots that qualify for the subsidy, at a center so expensive that WITH the subsidy it's as expensive as my in-home provider (who I am going to have to start paying full price in October when the old grant runs out). This at a school w/ over 20,000 students...
 
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