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Does anyone know how many jelly beans I must eat to equal the sweet liquid I'll receive for the glucose test? Do you know a source that I can use to look up such information?

(also posted on Midwives board)

Thanks, Claralyn
baby #1 edd 11.05.03
 

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My midwife allowed me to eat a regulated breakfast (2 whole wheat pancakes with maple syrup, 2 fried eggs and a glass of orange juice) once a week for three weeks, monitoring my blood sugar both before and exactly one hours after eating. She was following the guidelines given by another midwife in a book, but I can't remember the book. In it the exact amount of carbs/sugar for this meal is layed out. I thought this was much more reasonable than eating sugar syrup, but when I ended up birthing in the hospital the docs questioned the results. What do they know anyways?
I wish you luck.
 

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I did 18 brach's jellybeans 45 minutes before they checked my sugar. I had the choice of this or a specified meal, but since I'm 1.5 hours from my MW, it was easier to transport the jellybeans and just eat them halfway through my trip. But I'll warn you...consuming 18 jellybeans in a period of two minutes is just about as disgusting as drinking the glucose drink that the drs. give you. And probably overloads your system with sugar just as much...
 

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The point is to overload your system with the sugar. I had a glucose tolerance test when I was 13 (the twelve hour one), and I didn't think the glucose drink was that bad. Tasted like overly sweet coca-cola to me. Given that I hardly ever drink coke now, coke tastes overly sweet...but it shouldn't be that tough to get down.
Anyway, I'll probably refuse the test. I already know I'm hypoglycemic and fasting for the stupid test would do neither me nor the baby any good.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Ravin
The point is to overload your system with the sugar.
Actually, the point is to see how your body is metabolizing the sugar you take in, and how quickly it is doing so. A fast ending in a sugar overload doesn't rightly show how your body is handling sugar during the course of a normal day with normal meals. Unless of course you're in the habit of fasting for 12 or more hours and then drinking a coke and eating a candy bar for breakfast. This is why the GTT is so controversial...a lot of women "fail" the test when their body can actually handle normal amounts of sugar under normal circumstances just fine. The test sets you up for failure because your body isn't used to having to metabolize that massive amount of sugar in such a short time.
 

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Yes, Charlotte, you are 100% right.

At our birth center we have a 50 gram carb menu, and we have moms fast from midnight until the next morning. They are to finish consuming their breakfast one hour before their appointment (it is called a one hour post prandial test) I dont' know the menu exactly--there are two to choose from, but they include sugar in the form of a juice or jelly, protein in the form of milk or eggs, and carbs in the form of toast or breakfast cereal.

We are interested in how your body reacts to FOOD, not to a sugar binge. We certainly hope you aren't fasting for 12 hours, then drinking a coke and eating ho hos and ding dongs for breakfast!

As far as I know, we have had 3 women in 2 1/2 years fail the 1 hour post prandial. One had to monitor her diet and do regular finger sticks...the other did some dietary changes (though her diet was very good to begin with) and then she did fine. The other refused to retest, and we kept her in our practice (though she had a huge baby, with shoulder dystocia....). I think all or at least most of these women will end up with adult onset diabetes later on. I think that when we catch someone with "gestational diabetes" what we really are finding are women who all ready have some insulin resistance, but with the stress of pregnancy and the frequency of monitoring (I mean, how often is your blood sugar otherwise checked?) we discover them earlier in the disease process. Not saying that everyone who fails the sugar overload will develop diabetes later in life....I'm talking about a post prandial test. And it is just my opinion, but of course I like to share my opinion...
 

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My midwife had me eat 2 Glucerna bars (25 grams of carbs each), did a baseline right after I ate, then 3 more glucose checks (using accu-check) an hour apart.

It showed that I am hypoglycemic, so I now have to moniter my glucose and carb intake, along with monitoring my blood sugar just as someone with GD does


Finally showed why I ALWAYS got awful sick if I didn't eat at 4 hour intervals even when not pregnant though. Enlightening.
 

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Are you worried about the drink? I was worried that it would be nasty with my first pregnancy and was bracing myself to vomit it all up but it tasted like sprite. Got a little gassy chugging it so fast but other than that it was ok.
 
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