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I have heard that dying silk scarves with koolaid only works for some colors. i would like to dye scarves and achive a nice solid rainbow of colors - has anyone who has tried get good results?<br>
Any recommendations?
 

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I haven't tried kool-aid, but I did buy a simple tie-dye kit at Hobby Lobby, and used the 3 primary colors and made a great rainbow of scarves that way. It was actually fairly quick and easy.
 

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I didn't use kool aid but I used powdered jello packages which I think would give a similar effect. It depends on what you are going for. Trying natural dyes will only yield light or pastely colors. The red jello turned pink and the bright green a light green. My favorite and easiest dye was with turmeric which turned the dye a bright yellow. Plus, they are hard to rinse out and fade with the wash. I think they are okay for a quick fix or craft project but for super pigmented or dark colors, you need the real dye tablets. Just an FYI too, I determined that the price of the dye combined with blank silks costs just as much as buying an already dyed playsilk. I guess if you were a teacher or dyeing lots of playsilks this would seem cost effective but if you are like me and only needing a couple here and there, buying them blank and dyeing them doesn't seem very cost effective when you could just buy one for ten bucks or so and get it over with. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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Yeah, the best way to dye stuff is to do a workshop, have lots of people bring their stuff and do pots full. Then you get efficient amounts of fabric in relation to the dyestuff.<br><br>
One of the brightest natural dyes, which is also very easy to work with are these bugs from South America called cochineal. This is actually an ancient dye, used all the way back in Roman times, only in those days they used a European bug that lived in Spain. The women who gathered the bugs kept one fingernail extra long <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> It gives a lovely purplish red and it is a non-toxic substance, so you can also use it for dyeing Easter eggs. It used to be used as a food coloring, too.
 

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The local Threads Guild offered an acid dye class here last winter and since then a group of us gets together to dye our wool or silk about once a month. I bought a couple of metres of silk fabric and have been dying a few at a time. It's been so much fun, looks beautiful and IMO I saved a lot of money compared to buying it pre-dyed/cut. Maybe there's a similiar group around you?
 

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I've used Kool Aid before (in fact I'm using it right now <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">) and it was fabulous!! I used 2 packages for a 36" x 36" silk and all my colours were bright. I also found that using Kool Aid made the playsilks way less expensive than buying the premades.<br><br>
Good luck with yours.
 
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