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Hi Ladies,<br><br>
I am a long time lurker sometimes poster and want some input on suctioning baby after birth.<br><br>
I am having my 4th baby at home in mid Oct. I don't want a bulb syringe near my baby at all and wanted to know what you all do.<br><br>
Do you let the midwives suction your baby or just leave the baby alone???<br><br>
I personally feel like that thing can do more harm than good!!!<br><br>
Looking forward to everyone's opinion!!<br><br>
Katie<br><br><br>
Oh, and off the subject a little......how do I get my little signature on all of my posts???
 

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You might want to go to the Birth and Beyond Forum, and look for the recent thread on suctioning started by pamamidwife! There has been active debate on tihs lately---w/few who believe suctioning routinely is good.
 

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your baby traveling through the birth canal should be enough. Our son had no need for any suction, and I agree...it could do more harm than good!
 

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with my UC baby she had a lot of goo in her mouth, not a ton but she was sputtering a bit. I wasn't alarmed but thought it looked annoying so I did some very gentle mouth-only suctioning myself. I doubt seriously that it was necessary; and I only did a tiny bit, very carefully. I HATE the way they suction babies in hospitals. I wouldn't let a midwife do it.
 

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DD was born in a hospital and I remember them jamming that nasty syringe in her mouth. DS was born at home and my midwife never even touched it. At my 37 week visit when I was in the clear to have a homebirth, we discussed all the details and I told her I would rather her wait and assess the baby before using it automatically. She was happy to comply when he pinked up right away and showed no signs of needing it. I agree that it is WAY overused!
 

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I've had two homebirths. My second homebirth baby didn't need suctioning. My first homebirth baby did. There was meconium when my water broke. The midwife was incredibly gentle. She didn't use a bulb syringe - it was this tube thing that she somehow suctioned the baby with using her own mouth to use the suction - I have NO idea what it's called. It didn't bother my daughter at all though. I've had two hospital babies - one who was suctioned vigorously - the other "normally." My midwife at home was so gentle and the difference was amazing. I wouldn't have a problem with a midwife doing that again. I wouldn't be happy with a bulb syringe either. I'd ask the midwife what she would use if the baby needed suctioning.
 

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My dd was born before the midwife arrived and it was not necessary to put anything in her mouth but the boob. Suctioning can also cause trauma to the mouth (forget what that's called) if done too agressively.
 

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I don't remember any suctioning during my first 3 homebirths. My 4th, had meconium in my water. So they used the little tube and canister suctioner ColoradoMama mentioned, just to be sure it was all out. He didn't seem at all upset by it cause it was done very gently.
 

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I read somewhere that the baby can react to the suctioning by aspirating 'more' of the gunk than if they were left alone, and either held face down to "drain" or simply swipe a hand over their nose and mouth...
 

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Even with meconium, any type of suctioning is NOT evidence-based. Midwives, just like OBs, are not always quick to jump to what is evidence-based. sometimes it's hard to get rid of those old rituals.<br><br>
IMHO, there is nothing GENTLE about sticking a tube down a new baby's throat. I'm serious here.<br><br>
NO SUCTIONING! NONE! (unless you're gonna intubate or resuscitate)
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>pamamidwife</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9095712"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Even with meconium, any type of suctioning is NOT evidence-based. Midwives, just like OBs, are not always quick to jump to what is evidence-based. sometimes it's hard to get rid of those old rituals.<br><br>
IMHO, there is nothing GENTLE about sticking a tube down a new baby's throat. I'm serious here.<br><br>
NO SUCTIONING! NONE! (unless you're gonna intubate or resuscitate)</div>
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</tr></table></div>
I can see that you are very adament about your stance - I am still going to have to disagree with you, however. I truly resent the first remark - my midwife is absolutely amazing and not by any stretch of the imagination a mainstream sheeple.
 

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well, what I'm getting at is it is NOT evidence-based. To be fair, mama, I'm not disagreeing that your mw isn't awesome. Did I say that? No, what I said is that it takes awhile for any of us to let go of things that we were taught, even when the evidence shows us otherwise. There are many, many things that I've done that is not evidence-based but I did it because it was what I was taught or what I "knew". It didn't make me a sheeple.<br><br>
I am adamant - because this is something that is routinely done even in homebirths...and we need to rethink why we're doing it.<br><br>
I have a strong stance for evidence-based practice. I also have a strong stance for a newborn baby's first experiences in this world.<br><br>
We can disagree about my strong feelings on this, but what we cannot disagree on is the evidence. It's loud and clear. It's bad enough that obstetrics is the least evidence-based field of medicine - I think midwifery should be superior to that in regards to what the evidence and research shows.<br><br>
Even the most amazing midwives are still doing this - and it's not because they're ignorant or because they're sheeple. It's because we haven't brought it to the forefront enough. We haven't been bringing it up enough. That's what I'm doing. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Pamamidwife - what is the evidence against it? What bad can happen? I need this info for DH that was pretty shocked that our mw wouldn't suction automatically. thanks!
 

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Here's the thread: <a href="http://mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=737473" target="_blank">http://mothering.com/discussions/sho...d.php?t=737473</a><br><br>
There is a ton of info here, but basically it boils down to never suctioning a baby unless it's needing resuscitation. Meconium or no, if it's tone is good, leave it alone. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>pamamidwife</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9095712"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Even with meconium, any type of suctioning is NOT evidence-based. Midwives, just like OBs, are not always quick to jump to what is evidence-based. sometimes it's hard to get rid of those old rituals.<br><br>
IMHO, there is nothing GENTLE about sticking a tube down a new baby's throat. I'm serious here.<br><br>
NO SUCTIONING! NONE! (unless you're gonna intubate or resuscitate)</div>
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</tr></table></div>
My midwife just mentioned this to me. We had meconium with dd and that is one of my concerns with this baby. She said "they're" finding that if the baby is vigorous (sp?) right after birth there is no need to suction even with meconium. I was thrilled to hear this b/c that was very hard for us. DD was SCREAMING and it seemed like it would never end. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/gloomy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Gloomy">:
 

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I found this thread while wandering around tonight. This has really shown up in a lot of different places this week.<br><br>
I am a neonatal resuscitation instructor and a home birth/birth center midwife.<br>
Since 2005 the American Academy of Pediatrics, who puts together the best evidence when it comes to helping babies get started in terms of resuscitation, has said that there is no evidence that babies who have mec in the waters should be suctioned at birth as long as they are vigorous. They define vigorous as heart tones greater than 100 BPM , pinking up, good muscle tone.<br>
As long as this is what the baby looks like and is doing then they do not have mec in the lungs and are not at risk for meconium aspiration syndrome.<br><br>
ACOG came out this month (9/07) with a statement agreeing with this evidence (only 2 years late). They say that babies, including with mec, should not be suctioned on the perineum, or after birth, if they are vigorous as defined above.<br><br>
The reason for this is that it is unneeded and may cause harm. Even gentle suctioning can cause damage to the vocal cords and can also result in an oral aversion for the baby. This means that the baby doesn't want anything in it's mouth including a soft breast with sweet, warm milk. Makes it much harder to breastfeed when baby is trying to avoid the breast.<br><br>
I'm also a IBCLC and have been horrified for years by aggressive suctioning on a baby which didn't need it. It looks so violent and I can't imagine what the poor baby thinks about such a "welcome".<br><br>
The problem is that the time between the research being done and published and the practice becoming the norm among hcp's is usually 5-7 years. Look how long midwives have been saying don't cut the cord immediately at birth because the baby needs to get it's blood from the cord and placenta. Finally, there have been several studies this year which showed that early cord cutting causes newborn and early infancy anemia. All baby needs is two minutes with an intact cord. The docs on a list I belong to have now started talking about this and whether they should change their practices.<br><br>
First do no harm.<br><br>
If anyone would like a pdf of the ACOG statement let me know.
 

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Look at it this way. Suctioning is a pretty new thing for human birth! We have managed just fine for a long time without it. I'm sure God didn't screw that part of birth up <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/privateeyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="private eyes">
 

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<b>Mothercat,</b> I would really like to see that PDF.
 

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Several of you have requested the pdf and I have been sending it out. So I hope that everyone has gotten it.<br><br>
Wanted to thank everyone for taking the time to spread the word.
 
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