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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hello ladies. we are anxiously awaiting our new baby girl (through adoption - she is not yet born). i have some donated colostrum (under 20 ounces) that i would love for her to get. i have a full supply and do not anticipate any problems exclusively nursing her. i did have several issue with my ds (flat nipples, over-active letdown, thrush) but i think they were mostly related to over-supply.

what do you think would be the best method of feeding her colostrum? i do not want to do bottles at all. i was thinking either a dropper or some kind of sns.

thanks in advance for any helpful thoughts!
 

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If she is a newborn that will be helpful to start her out with a SNS but since its a small amount maybe the dropper would work better. Also colustrom is rather thick not sure how that would work in a SNS stystem as I never done it. But if it comes rather slowly then I would say that would be as close to the way it would work naturaly the ony thing is you already have a full supply so she would be getting double the ammount she would need at a newborn.

Just an idea don't shoot me on it but Newborns have a stomach the size of a marble so then you would want to follow the guidline of once she is first born giving her only a few drops with a syringe. Her sucking reflex will be strong and she will feel the need to suck but not be actually hungry. So maybe for the first week you could use a binky or something she could suck on. Then the next day add a once of colustrom, next day two and so forth just go by the guildines of how big a actual newborn stomach is. Of course doing the feeding like a normal newborn feeding every two hours in that ammont. Then after the colustrom is done hook her right on the breast. Now if you don't use it all up, Or after a few days of that hook up the SNS with the colustrom in it. Does any of that make sense I hope so.

Here their is a chart on how big the babies tummy is.
http://www.lalecheleague.org/FAQ/colostrum.html
 

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From the link above.
"it is extremely important to breastfeed your newborn at least 8-12 times each 24 hours, and more often is even better. "

So basicly feeding your baby that amount of times. Day one and two, Using only a 5-7ML at a time, with a dropper. Day three 1oz at a time with dropper and then keeping up with the 8-12 times a day ammount in 24 hours. Day Seven 1.5,2oz at at time with several feeds through out the day. Maybe that was a better explanation. Then for the sucking reflex she will need to suck give her a binky only for a week. You can't put her at the breast with a full milk supply she won't be able to utilize it just yet. Then after a week of that routine. Put her at the breast and go from their. No SNS system needed. Trust me at a week old she will take just fine to it it would be similar process to those who have had premies and not able to nurse right away.

Note to get her to latch on easier use a nipple shield and take it away once your nipples have pulled out more. I myself have flat nipples and thats what I do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
wow, this is not at all the kind of advice i thought i would get. so you both think i should not put her to the breast for a few days? that seems so contrary to everything else i've read. i guess i didn't think starting out with a full supply would be an issue as i had a large amount of colostrum/milk even while pregnant with my ds. if she was bottle-fed they would start her right on a couple ounces of formula per feeding.

i am not entirely comfortable with the idea of holding off on nursing, or introducing a pacifier that early on. it seems like it would be pretty risky for her latch. maybe a good idea for us would be to pump or have ds nurse prior to each feeding for the first few days? that way she would have to do more sucking and get the milk slower....just thinking outloud here...kinda processing all of this.
 

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Personally, I would go ahead and put her to the breast. Babies modify their mouth position when they just want to comfort nurse. I would assume that she would do that after she is full.

The colostrum would be great for her, but I would worry more about getting her nursing then when she is going to get that colostrum. Maybe use a syringe and get a few drops of colostrum or what have you in her when possible until it is used up - not necessarily all in the first few days.

Are you currently nursing your other child? I assume so since you said you have a full supply. You could always have the older child nurse for a bit so that there isn't a rush of milk letdown for the newborn. The cool thing is...that very quickly your body will recognize which nursling is at the breast and modify the milk for each child.

I'm a low supply mom and have always had to worry about how to get my children enough while nursing. We use Lact-Aids. I have also had a child who had lot sof latch issues and silent reflux. It took me almost 6 months to get her nursing full time (and she NEVER had a bottle. I had to finger feed her when I couldn't get her to latch). I would NOT mess with something else because it can be a long, hard road to getting a child on the breast. It's definitely worth it. Dd is now 22 months and still nursing away. However, why bring on possible problems?

mandy
 

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I figured you would not be and truthfully its not totaly a bad thing to have a full milk supply but basicly the thing is she only has a small tummy and bottlefed babies are often over fed. I know a binky sounds like a bad idea but they use them in the NICU and premies latch on fine. The problem with those being used is interering with milk supply which you don't have. That would work to have a older child drink first or pumping first before letting her suck. I am really glad you want to feed your adopted baby just trying to think of a way where it would be the most natural for her. Remembering that her tummy is the size of a marble and your milk supply is enough for a 6 month old. Kinda tricky hugh. Ok maybe you would be game for syringe feeding as I suggested more natural to the way baby should be fed. Then pumping and having older child nurse first and sucking then. Although I bet that after a few times of that your milk supply will just increase and she will be getting over load of milk. I don't know touch situation you don't want to over feed her. But at least that way she would not have a bad latch issue. And by the time the milk came in maybe her tummy would be at least hold 2oz

BTW I tought my premie to latch on after using a binky, we did ok and I have flat nipples. I just had to be patient and show her how after a few tries she got it. Just using my NICU experience here. I BF her tell she was five.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by aja-belly
hello ladies. we are anxiously awaiting our new baby girl (through adoption - she is not yet born). i have some donated colostrum (under 20 ounces) that i would love for her to get. i have a full supply and do not anticipate any problems exclusively nursing her. i did have several issue with my ds (flat nipples, over-active letdown, thrush) but i think they were mostly related to over-supply.

what do you think would be the best method of feeding her colostrum? i do not want to do bottles at all. i was thinking either a dropper or some kind of sns.

thanks in advance for any helpful thoughts!
20 ounces of colostrum?
I think I got less than two ounces total in the first few days before my milk came in...then the milk had a yellowish tint so I know there was some colostrum in there...but anyway -- I would suggest having your ds bf first or pump first for the first few days, that way she gets more hindmilk and isn't immediately overwhelmed with milk. I'd get her to breast right away though. I would probably just use a dropper. I doubt she will overeat...if she gets all she needs in a few minutes, she'll probably just drift asleep, kwim? Good luck -- how exciting for you!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by twins10705
20 ounces of colostrum?
I think I got less than two ounces total in the first few days before my milk came in...then the milk had a yellowish tint so I know there was some colostrum in there...but anyway -- I would suggest having your ds bf first or pump first for the first few days, that way she gets more hindmilk and isn't immediately overwhelmed with milk. I'd get her to breast right away though. I would probably just use a dropper. I doubt she will overeat...if she gets all she needs in a few minutes, she'll probably just drift asleep, kwim? Good luck -- how exciting for you!!

yeah, it's mostly just the really orange/yellow milk.

i think the dropper sounds like the best plan so far. does anyone have any experience with a dropper and a newborn?

i think she will be fine without colostrum, but we are flying home like a week after she is born, and i'm still so nervous about a newborn in an airport.
the added immunities and protection from colustrum would make me feel alot better. so just giving her some throught the first week or so (not necessarily the first couple days exclusively) sounds like a great idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
another question - what is the danger of over-eating? like what should i be concerned about? as a newborn ds was definately overeating (gained alot of weight *fast*, spit up often, and was basically choking down milk). i thought it was something to kinda wait out until their tummy got bigger.
 

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can you consult with a lactation consultant familiar with adoptive breastfeeding? i personally don't have any experience with this subject, but i do know that adoptive mamas often use an SNS or Lact-Aid to provide baby with at breast nourishment while building up their supply.

i actually just remembered a friend sent me her own personal version of an adoptive nursing guide that you might find helpful. one website she referenced is http://www.lalecheleague.org/NB/NBadoptive.html if you pm me your email address, i can send you a copy of the guide.

my gut instinct would be to put baby to breast right away, not worrying so much about the size of baby's stomach, which expands rapidly in the first few days due to fluid intake. as for actually getting colostrum in the baby, a dropper or syringe and finger feeding tube seem like the best and most cost-effective ideas (as opposed to an SNS or Lact-Aid) for that short period of time.

and an early congratulations on the newest coming addition to your family...


~claudia
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
claudia - i am just an hour or so north of you right now. do you know of an lc in the area that knows much about adoptive breastfeeding? i had no luck finding someone at home, but maybe up here i will have more luck.
 

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yes, yes, yes!!! Dixie Whetsell of Beyond Birth Lactation Services at 503.232.2229 is the absolute expert on adoptive nursing in the Portland area! Please tell her that I gave you her name.

are you awaiting the birth of your adoptive girl up here? or are you living up here now?

~claudia
 

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You have gotten a lot of good advice. Have you asked in the Adoption forum? There are tons of adoptive breastfeeding moms there too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
thank you! we are in olympia waiting for her to be born. we live in north texas.

Quote:

Originally Posted by TurboClaudia
yes, yes, yes!!! Dixie Whetsell of Beyond Birth Lactation Services at 503.232.2229 is the absolute expert on adoptive nursing in the Portland area! Please tell her that I gave you her name.

are you awaiting the birth of your adoptive girl up here? or are you living up here now?

~claudia
 

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something else-

a long time ago I read a summary of a study that tested a woman's milk after nursing a toddler on one side and a 4 month old on the other. both sides were different- the milk was formulated to each child's need. Now, I don't know how long that took, but I bet your body will do the same, and produce-if not colostrum-very high calorie milk.

good luck. I think getting bf'ing established has to be #1 priority, and the best way to ensure that is not using other feeding methods- if this colostrum has been frozen, your own milk may be healthier anyways.
 

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Aja - finger feed her the colostrum, put her to breast right away, and dont worry about overfeeding unless you see signs in her that she may be. I wouldn't do the SNS because it can be really hard to wean from and I wouldn't worry about a nipple shield until you see how she does - she may latch right on and pull the nipple out no problem.

And try not to worry or over-plan during this anxious wait!
Your milk will change to suit her and any breastmilk is a 100% better option than formula.
~Shannon
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
thanks shannon! i was hoping you would see that. i was about to go dig up your e-mail adress to get your input.


i have not been able to track down the kind of syringe it seems like you need for finger feeding. i have a couple different syringes and medicine droppers to try. my current plan is to just nurse her at the breast in the hospital, and if all is going well when we get back to our suite to try getting some colostrum in her. i'm all ready a bit anxious about the hospital and adoptive breastfeeding. i don't wanna add third party donated colostrum into the mix.
 

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HI. Idon't belong in this foprum but this post caught my eye.

Why would it be any different then tandem nursing? I had a full supply when Aidan was born becuase I was still nursing Ash.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by Apwannabe
HI. Idon't belong in this foprum but this post caught my eye.

Why would it be any different then tandem nursing? I had a full supply when Aidan was born becuase I was still nursing Ash.
i can't imagine it would be - except of course that you have the added colostrum if you give birth.

all the stuff about not nursing for a week and using a pacifier does not make any sense to me. it kinda makes my head spin.
:
 
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