Mothering Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,435 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone here seen the documentary "What a Way to Go" <a href="http://www.whatawaytogomovie.com" target="_blank">http://www.whatawaytogomovie.com</a> ? I was wondering how many people are making big changes because of the big picture of the world? I know it is a big motivator for us to work towards homesteading NOW and not later. Does that question even make sense? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
Laura
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,825 Posts
I haven't seen that movie, but I've done a fair amount of reading about peak oil and similar topics.<br><br>
For me, moving out to the country and attempting to become more self sufficient is partly in response to the way our civilization is heading. Perhaps I'm too optimistic, but I don't see BIG changes happening in our culture until the end of, or after, my lifetime. But I do think it is important for my children to know how to live well and live simply, because I think it will be a big issue in their lifetime.<br><br>
I must admit, though, that I am struggling right now. Living in the country isn't as self-sufficient as I thought it would be. For us personally, we are dependent on DH commuting to his job to sustain our lifestyle (to pay our bigger mortgage). It just wouldn't be possible for us to live off the land here. We also have to drive farther and consume more resources to buy groceries, buy building supplies, or even pick up freecycle items. And even for someone who has gardening experience, it's not easy to go from 'gardening for fun' to 'gardening to sustain our family.'<br><br>
So, to answer your original question, I am making big changes because of the picture of the world. But I've come to realize that acquiring the skills and knowledge to become self-suffient most important to me. If the economy was to collapse because of oil reserves disappearing, we would not be 'safe' where we are. We would have to move somewhere cheaper, and hopefully use the plant propogation, animal husbandry, carpentry, and other life skills we've acquired to make a good life for ourselves there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,435 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Ann,<br><br>
I do worry about our ability to learn those skills but we are blessed to have circumstances that make it more likely to be able to get on our feet and make the switch from outside income to self-sustainability. Both my husband and I work from home doing things that we will be able to continue to do: my husband almost completely from home and me with one weekly trip to town. So as we reduce our debt load and start building up our resources at home we should be able to earn money from our home.<br><br>
We've recently found a property that I am excited about and we'll go see it this weekend.<br><br>
I am approaching this from two different angles. One, I want to feel secure and self-sufficient no matter what happens with the world and economy. I want to live a more primitive, simpler lifestyle (it's how I grew up and I am coming full-circle to my roots) and I think it will be good for my children. I want to have more connection to the earth and be more grounded to my local environment.<br><br>
The second motivation is my unease with what is happening in the world. our consumptive lifestyle and economy can't last forever and there's no telling when systems will start to break down or collapse. I want to live a lifestyle where my family will be safe and able to live without a lot of outside resources and where we have resources that are truly valuable to trade for things we don't produce ourselves.<br><br>
I'm feeling blessed that everything seems to be falling into place for us to make this move and that my husband and I are in agreement about it (which has not always been true).<br><br>
I hope you are able to learn the skills you require. I was wondering why you would have to move in order to use those skills? Is your current environment unable to support you even with skills and tools in place?<br><br>
Laura
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,825 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I hope you are able to learn the skills you require. I was wondering why you would have to move in order to use those skills? Is your current environment unable to support you even with skills and tools in place?</td>
</tr></table></div>
Looking at it from a peak oil standpoint- if gasoline was to become completely unavailable, DH couldn't get to his job, and then we wouldn't be able to afford the mortgage. DH does have a flexible employer and he works from home 2 days per week. But if the cost of gas were to skyrocket, it would seriously impede our ability to live in the country because we might not be able to afford the cost to commute. It's not really a matter of being able to eat, because we can garden and raise animals. It's a matter of being able to pay the mortgage and property taxes.<br><br>
Hope that makes sense.<br><br>
Before we bought our current home, we had considered staying in the city and saving to buy (pay cash for) a small acreage out in the middle of nowhere as a vacation/summer/backup home. But instead we decided to buy our current home, which is on the outskirts of a metro area. Yes, we have the land and zoning to homestead, but we also have a big mortgage because we're within commuting distance of the city.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,327 Posts
I have seen that movie along with various others like End of Suburbia and the follow up one.<br><br>
For me, the changes I am making involve staying in the same town and working with what we have. We have relocated DH from his job working for a truck parts wholesaler which was about an hours drive from home to now working for a local company doing something completely different.<br><br>
I have established a large permaculture garden in my backyard, have chickens and learning about everything to do with growing - a completely new thing for me! Being where I live, we are now in summer, so I will soon be learning about storing and keeping my harvest, preferably using 'old' ways that don't rely on the freezer or canning.<br><br>
We have a woodburner for cooking or heating water if it came down to it, have a water tank built under our house to collect roof water etc.<br><br>
We live within walking distance of many things so we wouldn't need to rely on oil for transport.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,076 Posts
We bought a solar house last year. It's on about an acre and came with a large compost pile and a woodstove. We arent' growing anything other than tomatoes, yet. We really don't know much about gardening although we would like to learn, of course.<br><br>
Now that we are in the place to get a vehicle, we want to buy deisel so we can run bio-deisel. We sold both of our other cars to pay for a year abroad. So, we're back and currently looking for a vehicle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,435 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>annethcz</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9939883"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Yes, we have the land and zoning to homestead, but we also have a big mortgage because we're within commuting distance of the city.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
That makes sense. I guess I was thinking you were saying IF there was TOTAL collapse you'd have to move in order to be able to grow food and animals to feed your family etc.<br><br>
We are currently living in a metro area and we're going to have to go about 3 hours away to get the land cheap enough that we don't end up in the same situation. Even 1 trip a week will be a pain but I know there are people who commute that far daily. Plus my goal is to be able to let that source of income go and live on a lot less as we start supporting ourselves and making some money from the homestead.<br><br>
By the way, your family is beautiful!<br><br>
Laura
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,435 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>nathansmum</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9940346"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I have seen that movie along with various others like End of Suburbia and the follow up one.<br><br>
For me, the changes I am making involve staying in the same town and working with what we have. We have relocated DH from his job working for a truck parts wholesaler which was about an hours drive from home to now working for a local company doing something completely different.<br><br>
I have established a large permaculture garden in my backyard, have chickens and learning about everything to do with growing - a completely new thing for me! Being where I live, we are now in summer, so I will soon be learning about storing and keeping my harvest, preferably using 'old' ways that don't rely on the freezer or canning.<br><br>
We have a woodburner for cooking or heating water if it came down to it, have a water tank built under our house to collect roof water etc.<br><br>
We live within walking distance of many things so we wouldn't need to rely on oil for transport.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
That's awesome that you can do so much from where you are. We don't live in a situation where we can have any livestock type animals and even without a big mortgage our standard of living is way too high. It costs 325$ a month to board my horse as an example because we can't have him at home.<br><br>
I'm so interested in your permaculture efforts. I've been reading and dreaming about permaculture for a few years now but I admit to feeling a little anxious about my ability to do it in practice. One of the first things I plan to do when we move is get started on the permaculture planning and make the ground changes necessary (like swales to help water use) and get the slower growing plants in like fruit trees.<br><br>
One of my concerns is that the property we are looking at is a high-desert climate and doesn't get a lot of precipitation. It has a good well for irrigation but if the well were to fail we'd be hard put to live there. I am encouraged though to see the pictures and read about the permaculture garden in the dessert of (I think) new mexico from the book Gaia's Garden.<br><br>
Laura
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,435 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Gunter</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9942039"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">We bought a solar house last year. It's on about an acre and came with a large compost pile and a woodstove. We arent' growing anything other than tomatoes, yet. We really don't know much about gardening although we would like to learn, of course.<br><br>
Now that we are in the place to get a vehicle, we want to buy deisel so we can run bio-deisel. We sold both of our other cars to pay for a year abroad. So, we're back and currently looking for a vehicle.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
That's awesome! I can't wait to get started on our own plans. We are looking at a property tomorrow that has a built-green house built already with solar and everything you need. It would make it a lot quicker to buy a property that already has most of what we are dreaming of and we can focus on animals and gardening instead of home-building. I'll update after we've seen it.<br><br>
Laura
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,076 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Sijae</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9944480"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">That's awesome! I can't wait to get started on our own plans. We are looking at a property tomorrow that has a built-green house built already with solar and everything you need. It would make it a lot quicker to buy a property that already has most of what we are dreaming of and we can focus on animals and gardening instead of home-building. I'll update after we've seen it.<br><br>
Laura</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
yeah, being able to move into a house already finished was great. we are slowing doing work to the house but nothing was in disrepair. we just want newer, more efficient appliances and storm screen and exterior doors. we'll probably get updated cabinets at some point and remove a few things in the kitchen like a trash masher! just things to make it work better for our family. the owners were here from when the house was built 24 years ago. they live only a mile or so away and have been over to visit us, even. that was really cool to walk the grounds with them and learn everything that is planted here. hope your search is going well!
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top