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Is this necessary? I'm looking at an english bulldog puppy online from a rescue group, and part of his fee goes towards the tail docking surgery. I'm not really familiar with this, so it seems like tail docking is a purely cosmetic procedure (and in that case, I don't want to do it). Is there a reason that a dog would <i>need</i> this done? The idea of unnecessary surgery just doesn't sit well with me.<br><br>
UPDATE:<br><br>
I went back to find a link to the breeder, and I found some more info on this particular pup on their website. The tail docking is something that the rescue and the vets feel is necessary because of some medical issues...it looks like the poor girl was the victim of a bad breeder and she has some bad issues because of it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> Also, the rescue is in MI, even though PetFinder says she is in Southern California, so I guess she's not meant for us anyway.
 

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Can you post or PM me the rescue website?<br><br>
You shouldn't need to dock an older puppy's tail regardless of breed UNLESS due to poor or careless breeding it was born with a long tail that was badly crooked and was unlikely to be able to have it long-term without seriously injuring it.
 

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English bullies can have an issue with a "tight tail" but, that usually has more to do with the shorter, more twisted tails. If the bulldog's tail is too long that probably means, as you said, bad breeding. Unfortunatly this also means, there are likely to be other medical issues. I wouldn't suggest any people new to the breed take 'mystery' (no papers) bullies from rescues or anywhere else... unless you're rich and personally know a bulldog expert and a vet familiar with the breed's potential issues. My hubby and I love bulldogs but, as I don't want $3000 in vet bills the first year so we're waiting until we've saved at least $2500 or so for a healthy pup with garuntee.<br><br>
Bullies have eye problems (that can require surgery), lung and breathing issues by the hands full, pallette abnormalities, tail problems, allergies, foot clubbing and hind leg joint deformaties on occasion, they don't do well in high temps and can heat stroke easily, jaw and teeth issues down the road due to huge underbite, and they have regular eye excretion that requires daily attention as well as *eek* anal excretion and leakage, and their facial wrinkles need to be well kept, medicated, and cleaned or they can get raw and infected inside. If you plan to breed you take on the responsibility of not bringing more problems into the blood lines, paying for a c-section, and worst of all dealing with the possible loss of a pup or two (very hard, I've done that one <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> ).<br><br>
So, if you look at the potential issues you may want to make sure you get a well bred and yes, expensive bully rather than the rescue dog. Rescues for bullies are nessesary and wonderful but, I believe they should be left for kind experts and experienced breeder, showers, to adopt from so they can be sure to see those potential problems and take care of them before they get out of hand. If you really want a bulldog I'd suggest doing a long and hard search for a breeder. You make be stuck with having to drive a ways for a pup or even fly to get one.<br><br>
Don't mean to be a downer, just wanted to share my experience so you can see every side before you make a decision.
 
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