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Hi- So, I have a 21 month old nursling and I am due in July with our second. My DD has preferred my right breast since day one. I always had trouble getting her to nurse on the left but could "trick" her for many months. She hasn't nursed on the left now in close to a year (except for a quick sip here and there). I don't really produce milk now on the left. I am planning on tandeming and for some reason assumed that when my "new" milk came in, I would get milk "back" in my left breast. It just occurred to me tonight that that might not happen. I think a big part of her not nursing on the left has to do with that nipple not extending as far. I want to get the new baby to take both breasts, esp. because I don't see nursing them both on the right as very sustainable! Anyone have any ideas here? THanks!
 

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The new milk coming is induced by the hormones that flood your body after birth, which have nothing to do with what you were doing before. There's no reason you won't get milk in both breasts. Later, once the new-mama hormones subside bf'ing hormone responses are more localized so each breast needs individual stimulation to continue production.

You could try doing extra feeds with the new baby. on the side your DD1 doesn't like. Conciously try to favor that breast while the new baby is young enough not to have a strong opinion (or at least to have that opinion enforced). The new one might have a different preference, who knows?
 

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My oldest nursed on both my breasts untill he weaned. My second child nursed primarily on my right breast from about 4 months till she weaned at 2. When my milk came in with my youngest my left breast never produced as much as the right, and now at 4 months he is refusing the left entirely.

Your body should produce enough milk for whomever is nursing, even if they are both nursing on one breast.

If you have issues with your left nipple, prehaps seeing a lactation consultant prior to your babes birth would be helpful. There are ways to deal with flat or inverted nipples.

Good luck!
 

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ITA with everything above.

Its all supply and demand. One side has stopped because its not getting stimulated. If the new baby nurses on that side, it will start producing more milk.

If you have a concern about the nipple, see an IBCLC now and make a plan. They can help you.

I should add that is IS possible to tandem nurse on one side. There was an article in Mothering a few months ago about a mama who did that. She had been burned on one side as a child, and was only ever able to nurse on one breast. I think she may even have nursed twins with the one breast. A fascinating story.
 
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